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It’s almost like the journalist is writing the article for their readership.... 

 

I learnt long ago to ignore newspapers (especialist British newspapers) as at the end of the day they need to sell newspapers. Just reporting on the news (GW has done well and bucked the trend in retail in the UK), they need to make it appealing to their readership. 😉

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1 minute ago, Gaz Taylor said:

It’s almost like the journalist is writing the article for their readership.... 

 

I learnt long ago to ignore newspapers (especialist British newspapers) as at the end of the day they need to sell newspapers. Just reporting on the news (GW has done well and bucked the trend in retail in the UK), they need to make it appealing to their readership. 😉

This pretty much sums it up. For those of us more "in the know" with the games it can be a cinge-worthy read but its all about getting other audiences to read it, not us. A few quips like the "heroin" bit did seem a bit off putting though. 

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In fairness "plastic crack" and such are terms that many geeks use to describe their GW habit. It's more of an injoke. Plus in the UK GW is pretty widely known by many parents who dread the moment their child discovers the "EXPENSIVE" hobby. Even though its actually cheaper than many others. A good bike or camera can easily set you back the cost of a good army and paints. 

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The anti-social part was off, since that's like... the core of the game since it takes more than one to play warhammer. Middleclass? That's assuming that all middleclass people have the disposable income that seems to allow for warhammer in the first place, and is the only thing it's spent on, while forgetting that people from all walks of life spend hundreds or thousands on one off football tickets and the like. Regardless, it was still a positive article since the health and growth of the company is critical to our hobby.

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I’d say that’s a pretty fair and decent article tbh. If you can get through one like that in a paper like the guardian with just a couple of, let’s be honest hardly unmerited, digs then you’re doing well. 

If they wanted to run a  hit piece on the hobby, and the people into it, then it really wouldn’t be hard to so all in all it’s pretty friendly and well meant.

Edited by JPjr
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8 hours ago, HollowHills said:

https://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2019/jan/21/heroin-for-middle-class-nerds-how-warhammer-took-over-gaming-games-workshop 

Heroin seriously? Middle class? Coupled with comments about ruining your social life...

This guy seems ashamed of liking the hobby. 

Well you could almost see his point with those places in the internet saying "no complaining, reasoning allowed! Only positive attitidue (we are all doing heroin hobby here)!". 

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Maybe it is because I am Australian and knocking people down a peg as a sign of affection is probably in our citizenship test but I am not in the slightest bit offended or annoyed by this article. I thought it was quite good, funny and well written. Also, the subtext is that Warhammer is doing well because it is fantastic. (The author ends the article saying he went and got his shelf fix so he can again put his models on it again, read the article to the end). The bit about the meditative and relaxing benefit of painting is also a true. I know a lot of people who would benefit if they had a hobby like ours.

Edited by Greyshadow
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I found this article to be very good. In fact I would say that it is the best I have ever read from a "mainstream" media and one of the better ones in overall from any source. It has really good quotes in fun way and it is written by a guy who clearly knows what he is talking about.

 

i loved this part: 

Quote

“A fundamental 40k thrill is probably something involving a chainsword, which is a sword crossed with a chainsaw. That is over-the-top and silly, but also, in a very heavy-metal-guitar-solo way, exciting.”

 

Edited by Jamopower
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Aye, I thought this was a pretty good piece and was in support of the hobby and how well GW's doing. Also liked how the dude ended by being convinced to start an eldar force as well. 

Good luck to him! 

Edited by lare2
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I, too, think the article is overall positive, though the social life bit stung. Then again, there are people around my local store i wouldn't hang around in other public places with, so, maybe, just maybe, there's more truth there than we'd like. And it's a good thing to get those people off their screens and under a shower once or twice a week 😂

Edited by Lucur
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Don't see anything wrong with it. Its written for people who don't have the faintest idea what the game or company is, not for diehards who take apart every word and then get all reactionary in the comments.

 

Its almost as if noones heard the term "plastic crack" before.

Edited by Mosquito onthe TenthFloor
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Read the article, and besides a few comments that are clearly his opinion and some misconceptions on his part, understandable when looking from the outside in, it seems like fine article. I like my news more objective but hey that's personal. Nice that they had an returning (male) player, a new (female) player and a retailer in there. Only missed a direct comment from a GW designer. 

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The heroin comparison, as tongue in cheek as it is, is something that I agree with and actually get quite passionate about (EDIT: the cost bit, not the social life bit). Almost everyone I know who plays this game is unable to control their purchases, unable to complete what they wanted to complete. Most purchases are made with some grand plan in mind and rarely ever get to that stage, which does make me sad. I wonder what % of GW purchases go unfinished? I wonder what would happen if a magic omniscient thing could tell you, "by the way, you won't finish these" before you bought them. Would you buy them? What if you know that you only ever complete 20% of what you buy, would you buy them if it had a big sticker saying "80% chance you will never finish these" on them?

Add this to the fact that at least two of the people I know who can't control their hobby purchases are not in a great financial situation, which means that it suddenly becomes a real problem beyond shrugging off as an inconsequential hobby with little plastic men.

I sympathise massively, it took a great deal of organisation on my part to rein in my own purchasing habits.

I won't go into it much more here, but I do think that talking about the hobby and addiction in general are discussions worth having. I thought the article was great by the way.

Edited by Brad Gamma
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8 hours ago, Knight Scáthach of Fimm said:

The anti-social part was off, since that's like... the core of the game since it takes more than one to play warhammer. Middleclass? That's assuming that all middleclass people have the disposable income that seems to allow for warhammer in the first place, and is the only thing it's spent on, while forgetting that people from all walks of life spend hundreds or thousands on one off football tickets and the like. Regardless, it was still a positive article since the health and growth of the company is critical to our hobby.

You pretty much have to have a middle class income to spend hundreds or thousands on anything that isn’t life essentials though, in the UK at least. GW has been at least a lower middle class thing for as long as it’s existed here.  It’s probably more affordable than it’s ever been but if you want to persist in the hobby it’s an outlay or several hundred pounds at entry level even with stuff like Ebay etc.

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Considering that if you lurk ebay you can find things bought 10 or even 20 years ago that are STILL in the packet then I'd say there's a reasonably high turn over of models that never make it to the tabletop, nor even get built. It's one of those hobbies where when you're new to it you can buy, slap together a model and get it on the table in an afternoon; whilst once you get more experience that afternoon can be spent just leaning the mould lines and preparing a couple of models from the box. Yet as you gain more experience your spending habits are unlikely to dwindle without financial pressures forcing them. 

So yeah its very easy for this hobby to get out of hand; or to build up a backlog. 

And that's before we've even touched army hopping! There are honestly very few armies that I wouldn't enjoy putting together and building an army of and I know I'm not alone in that. It's terribly easy to burn out on one army and drift into another - a surge of new models, new ideas, new inspiration which can then fizzle and die. 

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1 minute ago, Nos said:

You pretty much have to have a middle class income to spend hundreds or thousands on anything that isn’t life essentials though, in the UK at least. GW has been at least a lower middle class thing for as long as it’s existed here.  It’s probably more affordable than it’s ever been but if you want to persist in the hobby it’s an outlay or several hundred pounds at entry level even with stuff like Ebay etc.

And yet I probably know of more lower-class gamers than I've casually met middle or upper. GW armies are expensive when viewed in their entirety, but can be reasonably affordable at their individual state. Heck these days cut out social drinking and that can be a £5-20 saving easily per week (and possibly more for some). 

Scrounge ebay and build the army slowly and you can actually amount a fairly healthy collection. Plus I think GW pushing things ilke Necromunda and Killteam and (eventually) skirmish are going to increase the uptake fast. GW has always had a big eye on the dedicated/affluent/insane teenage market. That young teenage market is where they snare many of their long term fans and its rarer to meet adults who drift into the hobby (at least unless they've already had a background of miniature model making)

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46 minutes ago, Overread said:

And yet I probably know of more lower-class gamers than I've casually met middle or upper. GW armies are expensive when viewed in their entirety, but can be reasonably affordable at their individual state. Heck these days cut out social drinking and that can be a £5-20 saving easily per week (and possibly more for some). 

Scrounge ebay and build the army slowly and you can actually amount a fairly healthy collection. Plus I think GW pushing things ilke Necromunda and Killteam and (eventually) skirmish are going to increase the uptake fast. GW has always had a big eye on the dedicated/affluent/insane teenage market. That young teenage market is where they snare many of their long term fans and its rarer to meet adults who drift into the hobby (at least unless they've already had a background of miniature model making)

As I said, middle class income.  You can be if a working class upbringing, like myself, but that rarely dictates your income anymore.

As a support worker who works with people who don’t have middle class incomes, the £5-20 a week you talk about as being as no issue  to put aside underline how middle class an assumption that is. If you have £20 spare a week, so roughly £100 per month, £1,200 per year, to spare on any hobby or past time or social activity that you don’t have to worry about spending on food or bills or clothes or rent or such or put into savings to protect against long term uncertainty, you’re not occupying the bracket of a lower class income comparativley speaking at all. You’re doing alright in those circumstances.

Edited by Nos
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