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Showing content with the highest reputation since 04/12/2016 in Blog Entries

  1. 30 points
    Reinforcements have arrived for the Kharadrong Raiders! Previously, the younger element of the remnants of the Grimharaz lodge were represented in the predominately Kharadron core of the army. With this new flight, more of the whole spectrum of the lodge is represented. Let's take a look! The traditionalists of the lodge, still adamantly aligned with Runefather Zharrik, are represented in the Fyreslayer Vulkite Berzerker and Auric Runesmiter units. Take note of the protective ur-gold runes flaring up and covering their upper torso in a magma-like crust to protect them from the blows of their enemies! This patterning is all freehand work. The Auric Runesmiter can be seen holding his Forge Key aloft as the molten crust parts before him and he emerges from the magma tunnels. This Runesmiter is converted from from WHQ Doomseeker and is appropriately equipped with both his Forge Key as well as his smoldering Latch-Axe. The younger generation, those aligned with Runeson Thrundrik and who more fully adopted the way of the sky fleets, are reinforced with the arrival of Thrundrik's very own Flagship, the Gorog Varrbarag ("Party Boat!"). You can see one of the crew as imbibed a tad too much and lays flaked out on the deck. And still, there are still other remnants of the broken lodge that have returned after their long exile. Some, like the Runelord Agrhun, have continued to practice a variant forms of rune magic although it has been decades since many shaped Ur-gold as the lodge's Runemasters once did. Others, jaded by age and broken dreams, have forsaken the traditions of runic empowerment and taken up the finest arms and armor in all the Mortal Realms. These grumbling Longbeards take every opportunity to remind the Shattered Lodge of what was lost. While still others, particularly the youngest and progressive of Thrundrik's followers who have spent a significant amount of time amongst the cities of the Firestorm Plateau, have worked to bridge the gap between technology and the magic of the Mortal Realms. The young upstart Hazgal, foremost student of this emerging discipline, has learned to harness the very energies of Hysh through rune craft. The culmination of his experimentation is found in an endrin-powered Luminark, a prototype war machine that Hazgal has managed to build and hopes to reproduce to reinforce Barak-Zharr and the remnants of the Grimharaz lodge. Such experimentation is looked askance by the traditionalists and only heightens the tensions present amongst the reunited lodge. Only time will tell if the remnant will survive.
  2. 26 points
    So the dust is still up in the air, but I'm going to venture forth with some initial thoughts and reactions. The death of alpha strike? One consistent theme is the nerfing/elimination of many of the mobile burst damage combos in the game - KO Khemist stacking, Tretch + Skaven Warlords stacking, Sayl + X alpha strike, Stonelord alpha strike and even Cloak of Mists and Shadows on the Ghoul King on Terrorgheist. There are only a handful of really strong alpha strikes/burst damage melee combos left that spring to mind: Murderhost, Shock Gauntlet Storm Fiends with Packmasters, very expensive Tomb Kings and Warherd, Executioners with the Hurricanum, Skyborne Slayers and Hammerstrike Force. The question this raises is whether the move towards hordes and away from alpha strike means that the meta shifts back towards bunkers (and specifically Order Funlines). I'm concerned about Freeguild getting even more stand and shoot with their units giving out +1 to hit buffs like candy (already a powerful mechanic). The nerf to the Hurricanum is very necessary now. Battalion changes and Hordes Some good news for Death - almost all Battalions got jacked up in cost. This really changes the calculations for listbuilding - now you really have to pay a lot for that second artefact, rather than getting 3 easily. Single drop armies will be much rarer and there is a real trade off between models and battalions. In some cases, the cost increases are offset by cheaper battleline and/or volume discounts on hordes - best example being Sylvaneth. The Big Losers Mixed Destruction - headshots to the Kunning Rukk and a multi-pronged attack on the Stonelord (points vs other big monsters, halving wounds nerfed, Talisman nerfed and possibly the Battlebrew not affecting the mount - this depends on how explicit the reference to the mount should be). Mixed Death - the removal of the 5++ is devastating to Death's survivability. Death still don't have any credible way to reach out at range - indeed they have lost the Cloak teleport too (and Little Mannfred on a Balewind). The only good news for mixed Death is their non-reliance on Battalions, while everyone else is paying significantly more for these. Inherent Battleline - as they don't count as Battleline if they are allies. Effectively only used for Order, Death, Destruction, Chaos allegiance armies. Brayherd - the only positive is cheap as chips Bestigor spam, but the command ability of the general (absent named characters) is dire. They might be able to spam bodies in your face, but not as well as other armies. Kharadron Overlords - death by a thousand cuts for one of the most overpowered armies - the Thunderers are now rifle spam units, who are still decent output for the amount of ship capacity they occupy. Drill cannons have been nerfed by a third. Khemists don't stack and are 40 points more expensive. The Navigator lost his 3D6 unbind (which was a bizarre change). No cost reductions at all is painful (Gunhauler and Frigate). Bow Hunters - just not worth the points. They can at least move out of combat using Navigate Realmroots and still shoot (not a retreat). Crypt Horrors - seem like a bad choice compared to their flying mortal wounding, rending Crypt Flayer cousins. Mannderp - cannot be an ally - still Derpy Mcderp. Skyfires - I still feel 220 would be right - 3 Flies are 220. The Big Winners Daughters of Khaine A big point reduction on 30 Witch Aelves together with the lack of a ban on stacking buffs means 90 bodies with a quadruple 5++ Ward Save is now a thing - that's 80% of damage protected. Even just for the first Battleround this is meta-breaking. They can also spam Battleshock immunity and other buffs. Fyreslayers - the change from the truly dire Order Allegiance pack is immense. The Rune mechanic is exceptional - especially the across the board rend - I also like the extra throwing axe range, since this will buff the damage of 30 Vulkites and 30 Aurics popping up to say hi. Some of the cost reductions have been rolled back, but they are still cheap. The Vostarg Lodge is a win as it means that all your units will definitely be able to fight in melee for a battleround. The other battalion feels like a miss as it neglects the fact that the army can deepstrike with Runesmiters. Battleshock Immunity Bubble is nice. Artefacts aren't great. Freeguild - what was already a decent army has moved from the terrible Order allegiance to an exceptional new Allegiance pack. The battle trait expands stand and shoot options, which is already an infuriating mechanic (small models that can fly can partially mitigate this). They have a carbon copy of the Stormcast's incredibly strong Staunch Defender trait (called Indomitable - only it stacks with cover!) as well as solid artefacts - Armour of Meteoric Iron is a straight +1 save and Writ of Dominion is a once per game aoe wound buff). They also gained a cost reduction to their Griffon, which was already amazing value for 300. Legion of Azgorth - lots of subtle buffs. Cost reduction for the Bull Centaur Renders is strong - 60 wounds worth for 640 points with -2 rend, 2 damage. Take a Sorceror Lord as an ally and buff with reroll 1s to hit, wound and save. Slaanesh - so exciting - the triple general trait looks very tasty (e.g. take Archaon as one, but you still get a battle trait) or take two traits on your new shiny Exalted Greater Daemon of Slaanesh. The traits look strong too - especially the copy the Yhettee ability - you can stand out of combat at 4" away until the end of the combat phase (rather than charging), then pile in 6" and smash face. Supremely Vain is also a nice buff. Icon of Infinite Excess is a situational but amazing once per game aoe buff +1 attacks to all models including enemies - or summoned Bloodletters! Breathtaker looks good as a quasi-Forest Dragon toy. Ironjawz - I would defer to @Chris Tomlin 's superior knowledge here and excellent write up here - They have a copy of the (nerfed) Destruction move (a good change as it's much quicker than rolling for a Warmachine, rolling for its crew....), two sweet Battalions, the ability to chain activations if they wipe out enemy units (which creates a good tension between MSU and big units for both you and your opponent). Lastly there are material cost reductions for the Cabbages and Pigs (how are they less than 10 points per model!). Seraphon - look very nasty - can teleport Kroak into the front of your army and then Balewind and aoe spam against them. Same trick with Razordons (which got cheaper). Solid traits and artefacts. Stormcast - the nerf to all the overpowered mixed Chaos, Death and Destruction traits is a big plus for them. The availability of 2+ rerollable saves is a big advantage given the nerfs to burst damage discussed above. The Lord Celestant on Star Drake got a points reduction despite being a popular choice. They benefit the most from allies given their freedom to choose. Prayers appear to work on Allies (unlike Khorne Prayers....) which seems purposively wrong and isn't likely to survive long. Sylvaneth - As discussed, the nerfs to alpha strikes/burst damage melee combos mean that Sylvaneth's traditional grind, chip away and heal modus operandi should be viable (notwithstanding the nerfs to Hunters). Extra Battleline choices make Dreadwood viable. Wanderers - nice board edge mobility with their pew pew. Have a trait called Myst Walker which basically imports the 40K cannot shoot a character rule for your general. The Forget-me-knot allows you to incapacitate a charging Stonelord in the combat phase, which is hilarious. The Viridescent Shawl is decent for -1 to hit vs pew pew and a buff to nearby wizards. Tamurkhan's Horde - have a battalion which isn't pricey. Some units cheaper. Everchosen - source of cheap Battalions and Varanguard cost reduction. However, Archaon not any cheaper. Elite infantry in general - Stormvermin (and the costed the same White Lions!), Phoenix Guard, Bestigor, even Chosen. Jabberslythes - how can they be so cheap! The Rogue Idol - so good you can buy two in a box now. Obvious ally choice. Synergies better with Ironjawz now (Orruks). Troll Hag - cheaper and very solid - good spell! Freeguild General on Griffon - so cheap! The humble Treelord - cheaper. Drycha - got a buff to her aoe ability, so it no longer affects friendly units or here. Also good option vs hordes. Seems like you can pick which weapon she has before the game (e.g. it's not something you select on Scrollbuilder) - logically being a named character she does have the ability to do either and pick for each battle. Spite Revenants - might finally see the table now they are cheaper and battleline. Settra - now generic so trolling with the new Ring of Immortality - still a horrific amount of points. Neferata - now an ally choice. Cheaper. Arkhan - an immensely good wizard and troll. The Exalted Greater Daemons - with the nerf to pew pew and some subtle buffs to their scrolls, these are a real thing now. Mannderp - no longer costing you the 5++ Ward Save if you take as general. His Command Ability is great. I'm ambivalent about Pestilens and Skryre. I think they will find hard counters in the form of rerollable saves; and hordes respectively. The cost increase to Tunnelling Skryre is very welcome. I'm not convinced by Nighthaunt or FEC. The deepstrike ability for Nighthaunt in too risky and not so helpful for non-pew pew units. To be fair the Lightshard is an amazing buff on Spirit Hosts - as they only hit on 5+ Defenders of the Realm Delusion is decent to mitigate pew pew. I think Dark Wizardry is the only decent command trait - as their all important buffs are spells. The artefacts are pretty meh too - probably the gamble on the Chalice for healing D6 wounds. You can bring in a Necbromancer as an ally for Vanhels. As for Soulblight - the fly is nice. Their spells aren't good enough to warrant taking the buff to that (Blood Boil - sigh...). The Saccharine Goblet is a quasi battle brew - probably doesn't buff the mount sadly. The traits aren't great - retreat and charge might be the winner. Mannderp and Neferata aren't soulblight, which sucks.
  3. 23 points
    Skaventide Warscroll Changes All Clans Covered Ladies and Gentlemen, boys and girls. Presented here for you, by popular demand, is a total recap of the changed to all the Skaven scrolls laid out by Games Workshop. To the regular readers you will notice the Pestilens scrolls are in here despite already having been covered in a separate article. This is so anyone seeking a total guide doesn’t have to jump between the two. If you’re Pestilens supremacist or an enterprising Nurgle Maggotkin player perusing new options, go check out the separate article if you like. Now on to the meat of things. Masterclan Seeing a few significant changes to the head honchos, and most if not all of them good. Let’s get stuck in with the rulers of the Rat-Race. Grey Seer – increased to 120pts from 100 · Unique spell replaced with Wither, a powerful short range debuff. · Warpstone mechanic reworked to be more risk/reward. · Can cast 2 spells now. · Command ability has been removed. Finally the Grey Seer actually behaves like the erratic uber-caster he is meant to be. 2 spells is a great buff considering the Lore specifically for Grey Seers and the Warpstone mechanic is neat and thematic. Screaming Bell – Remained at 200pts · Confers battleshock immunity to nearby units. · Can’t move without being pushed now. · Same 2 spell buff as the Grey Seer on foot. · Peal of Doom reworked slightly. · Cracks Call range shortened. · Now has a 5+ ward save I was sold from the first point and this thing just gets better as you go down. Everything about the bell is neat and it’s thematic and most importantly, powerful. Verminlord Warpseer – Remained at 260pts · Doom Glaive damage is d3 instead of 3 but attacks 6 times instead of 4. · Now has a 5+ ward save. · Has the ability to accrue extra Command Points. · Command Ability now confers Battleshock Immunity. · Unique spell does d6 damage to target, rather than d3 or 3 to a flyer. · Received the new Verminlord bravery debuff effect. Another big winner, the Warpseer will find himself in a similar position to the Fungoid Cave Shaman, a powerful utility character that can farm command points and therefore get allied to everything that can take him ideally. Lord Skreech Vermining – Remained at 300pts · Same Doom Glaive change as Warpseer. · Thirteen Headed One mechanic reworked so all options are viable. · Now can cast 2 spells instead of one. · Verminlord bravery debuff effect added. · Thirteenth Dreaded Spell unchanged. My favorite Skaven character, Verminking received only a handful of changes specific to himself but they’re highly impactful. His access to 2 spells instead of 1 works well with his Knowledge of the Arcane rule to let him really lay the magical pain. Otherwise Skreech remains a reasonable option for Mixed Skaven, and a bit outclassed by the Warpseer for ally potential. Thanquol and Boneripper – Remained at 400pts · Warpflame mechanic changed to anti-horde focus. · Can mix and match whichever weapon options he wants per arm. · Command ability changed. · Received the Monster keyword. · Unique spell changed to anti-hero spell. · Arkhan the Black level casting buff from Staff of the Horned Rat. The cockroach of the Skaven clans, no amount of stepping on this little monster will ever keep him down. Thanquol emerges in the new book as one of the strongest named characters in the game with a swathe of devastating abilities that keep him strong in all phases of the game. Looking good, Prophet of the Horned One. Masterclan Verdict The Masterclan are looking fantastic after their changes. Im definitely convinced these guys are the undisputed masters of Blight City. There are two big Skaven players in NZ, myself and Mr Mitch Harty (twitter handle is bitch_party), and he’s always been a Thanquol man while I’ve been an adherent of Skreech Verminking. We both came out well from this but Mitch is definitely laughing his way to the bank. The Clans Verminus The soldiery of the rat clans, Verminus bring cheap chaff infantry and heavy hitting elites supported by small affordable leaders and the dread Verminlord Warbringer. Let’s dig in. Verminlord Warbringer – Decreased from 280pts to 260pts · Standard Doom Glaive change. · Verminlord bravery debuff added. · 5+ ward save added. · Punch Dagger has the chance to massively increase damage on a 6 to wound. · Receives combat bonuses for nearby rats rather than for charging. · Command ability is now wholly within. · Can now cast 2 spells. · Death Frenzy spell upgraded to target d3 units instead of just one. This guy saunters in and single-handedly makes Verminus Allegiance viable. We don’t even have the full picture and I can safely, SAFELY say this is a thing and this guy will lead it. Fantastic changes across the board that turn this lad from a brutal close combat sledgehammer to a powerful leader and support character… and a brutal close combat sledgehammer. Clawlord – Remains at 100pts (Renamed from Skaven Warlord) · Scurry Away mechanic replaces original retreat after fighting ability. · May only take the Warpforged weapon option now. · Command ability unchanged. Losing the other weapon options isn’t exactly a big deal as no one ran them anyway. Scurry Away isn’t as good as the old ability where he would fight then have a chance to run immediately after, but at least Scurry Away isn’t on a dice roll. In Verminus armies this guy can take a command trait along with every other Clawlord, so that should be quite interesting. Clanrats – Remains at 120/200pts · No longer receives combat buffs for being a large unit. · Shields now work against any damage rather than turning off against damage higher than 1. Changes to these guys are more in the Allegiance Abilities for the army than on their scroll. They still retreat and charge which is all anyone ever wanted from them anyway. Stay golden pony boy. Stormvermin – Remains at 140/500pts · Exact same shield change as Clanrats. · No longer get buffs for outnumbering their opponents. The changes to these are more in line with the fact that they are receiving so much else from the rest of the army with battleshock immunity, buffs to hit and wound and rerolls being thrown around hard and fast. Stormvermin are an expensive unit that require support to be good, but when they are supported there won’t be much this deadly utility unit can’t do. Clan Verminus Verdict A solid, well rounded series of warscrolls that are now believable as their own real, tactical force rather than just that time I took 1600pts of Clanrats and Warlords with 2 Screaming Bells allied to cheese a local store event. I look forward to seeing people crying on twitter as they realize how much detail their 89th Stormvermin actually has on the model. The Clans Pestilens My once and future army. My hard-cover Pestilens battletome was bought a week after their release, and it’s no secret my desire to play and win the army borders on the fanatical and unhealthy. I’ve annoyed many a person with constant deranged rants about why its fair the Plague Monk warscroll has more words than the Old Testament and I feel not just qualified but entitled to review and break down this section of the clans. Verminlord Corruptor – Increased to 260pts from 220pts · Unique Spell changed so that it does more damage, but no longer spreads. · Plaguereapers don’t reroll all their hits anymore but inflict mortal wounds on unmodified 6s to hit. · Plaguemaster now does AoE mortals around the Verminlord rather than tick off creatures that have already been hurt by it. · Received a 5+ ward save. · Received a passive bravery debuff to nearby enemies. · Command ability now grants rerolls rather than additional attacks. Big Cheese himself came out looking pretty good. Can’t help but feel that Plaguereaper change will have an FAQ saying he can’t take the Sword of Judgement on top of that ability so goodbye to that. His prior weaknesses (no rend, terrible survivability) have been fixed, and his strengths (two casts, high attack volume) made it through unscathed. Good changes, though I will miss his old unique spell even if it wasn’t exactly good. Plague Furnace – Remained at 180pts · Altar of the Horned Rat now just makes anything wholly within 13 inches ignore Battleshock. · The wrecking ball does far more damage but is a single target instead of AoE now. · The Plague Monk crew actually have attacks now. · It has the same ward save as the Verminlord Corruptor. · It has keywords that prevent it from receiving Look Out Sir now. Good lord GW the Plague Furnace didn’t actually need to be stronger. Yeah it can’t benefit from look out sir anymore, but they give it mini Crown of Conquest and a ward save? Like what? This thing only got better. Thank the Horned Rat I have 4. Plague Priest (Both Variants) – Remained at 80pts · Tumbled into one warscroll. · Gained the attack profiles of both original priests. · The Plague Tome once per game activation is gone. · Pestilent Prayers are all reworked (addressed at the bottom of the post) This was always going to happen. Plague Tome + Wither was one of the strongest combos in the Chaos grand alliance, and people were starting to wake up to it. A shame that they had to change him, but it makes sense why they did. A small price to pay for the rest of the changes, as Iskandar Khayon said in Black Legion, a sacrifice is only a sacrifice if it diminishes the giver. Plague Monks – Remained at 70/240pts · All once per game effects removed from command options. · Improved Rend on 6s and rats doing damage when they die left untouched. · Banner now causes 6s to wound to do double damage. · Doom Gong now boosts running and charge rolls. · Rerolls for two swords is still here, as is +1 attack for charging. The meat and bones of the army. This one was always going to get changed due to it being a troop unit with more rules than Kairos Fateweaver. But the changes are for the good… or so it seems. All the changes are really strong and benefit the unit. HOWEVER the warscroll specifies 1 in 20 for it’s command options, which likely means the minimum unit size has been upped to 20. Squashes a few of my tactics and will mean some changes. I will however roll with these changes and no doubt actually be better off with them (ideally). Plague Censer Bearers – Remained at 60pts · Aura of damage effect is slightly better. · They receive bonuses for being near monks at a slightly larger range now. I expected nothing and wasn’t disappointed. I was terrified these guys would be the recipient of random buffing that meant I would need to convert another 20 ****** Stormvermin into these, thanks for actually having my back there GW. Plagueclaw Catapult – Remains at 160pts · Receives artillery bonuses if there is 10 or more models in the unit, instead of more than 10. · Does a bravery debuff to victims. I was afraid this thing would get worse not because I use it (I have 3 fully panted to a high standard and they sit in a drawer somewhere) but because I’ve already ragged on it so hard, I wasn’t sure how I would somehow step that up. Pleased to say… that won’t be necessary. It’s slightly better. Changes to Pestilent Prayers and Noxious Prayers The original prayers on the warscrolls of the Plague Priest and Plague Furnace are now gone. They’ve been replaced with new effects that are fundamentally different with bizarre names. · Disease-Disease! (Formerly Wither): So instead of making it easier to wound the victim ala Wither, this is ow the Gaunt Summoner unique spell on a 6. Boo hiss. · Pestilence-Pestilence! (Formerly Plague Breath): It’s the same as before but the bubble is 3” not 2”. It also doesn’t affect Pestilens units, rather than Nurgle units. Neat. · Filth-Filth (Formerly Bless with Filth): Thank Christ it’s still the same. No changes here, and what a boon that is. · Rabid-Rabid! (Formerly Rabid Fever): Add 1 to the attacks of something nearby. So this is where they shoved the Verminlord command ability. I’ll forever miss the old one of this, my monks fighting after death is a MASSIVE part of my army’s reputation in NZ due to me taking 2 Furnaces and making sure it was always active. Pouring one out for you my lad. Clan Pestilens Verdict With widespread buffs to everything in the army and very few points increases, none of which could be called unjustified, Clan Pestilens is shaping up as the big winner of the clans so far. Saddle up lads, I will be your captain for this journey and the destination is, indeed, the podium. The Clans Skryre Blegh, really wanted to not do this one because of the sheer amount of reading and writing involved. I’ll save you some reading if you’re just here for Stormfiends: Yes, they got nerfed and no, nobody has any sympathy. Arch Warlock – Increased to 160pts from 140pts · Warpflame Gauntlet hits on a 2+ rather than being auto hit. · Can increase the damage of his melee weapon and spell at a risk. This could have gone a lot worse for Skryre players given the popularity of this lad. He’s still an excellent caster and his ability to take risk death to churn more damage is purely optional so really he plays the same as he did before. Also Skryre have their own whole table of spells for this guy to reap. 20pts isn’t much of an increase considering that. Warlock Engineer – Remained at 100pts · Slight rework to risk/reward spell mechanic. Almost entirely the same guy. As ever the devil is in the details and the devil here is Skryre’s new warp lore table. It will be interesting to see if other clans take him purely for that given his affordability. Stormfiends – Decreased from 290pts to 260pts · Can now only take squads of mixed weapons, what the box provides. · Warpflame reworked, see Thanquol and Boneripper. · 6+ triggers are now Unmodified 6 triggers. Damn Games Workshop, I’m not even sure if this was necessary. You could have just changed how warpflame works so a unit of only warpflame wouldn’t be hilariously devastating but sadly, new warpflame on a whole unit of these would be blatantly unfair. I’m hoping this leads to greater variety and interaction with Clan Skryre, but it will be a shame if people hang up their fiends for other options. Skryre Acolytes · Can run and shoot now. · Can’t shoot things they can’t see anymore. You were worthless cheap Skryre battleline before Acolytes and that is EXACTLY where you will remain unless the Skryre Battalion brings you fresh spice. No one would take these in mixed Skaven over Gutter Runners, and no one would play Skryre just to have these as battleline. Hopefully you catch this hard pass better than you throw globes. The Weapon Teams (Doomflayer 60pts, Warpgrinder 80pts, Warpflame 70pts, Ratling Gun 80pts) · All overload mechanics guarantee the death of the unit after its attacks are resolved now. · The drill comes up whenever you want but can inflict mortal wounds on the units tunnelling up. · Warpflamer changed to be in line with other warpflame weapons. The only one of these that will see any use outside of being mandatory for battalions is the drill, which now is a lot better given the risk of my 500pt unit of Stormvermin simply never surfacing isn’t a thing anymore. Warp Lightning Cannon – Remains at 180pts · Can double the dice for shooting at the risk of blowing the weapon up. · Now has 8 wounds instead of 6. Being able to choose to double the dice to fire the cannon is pretty awesome, even with the risk it entails. Just remember you have to choose to do it before rolling the power dice… pray you don’t roll a 6. Doomwheel – Increased from 120pts to 160pts · Can double it’s shooting attack at a risk. · Hurts every unit it roams over rather than just one. · Still a chance the enemy can move it instead of you. Look GW you made it better but you didn’t make it 40pts better. I was sold till I saw it can still run over and kill my own things on a bad dice roll and no matter how Skaven that may be, it gets a pass. Warplock Jezzails – Remained at 140pts · 6+ is now Unmodified 6 to hit. No real changes. Convert some up and drop them out a Gnawhole into shooting range. Not much else to say, they’re still good and they will see use. Clans Skryre Verdict Wow Skryre, you are tonight’s biggest loser. All I see here is a faction better suited to being allied than ran by itself. Acolytes are trash, Stormfiends require (shudder) actual skill now rather than just a silly battalion and some dice rolls and the weapon teams will just straight up disappear with one turn of bad luck. The only thing that can salvage this is a solid Allegiance ability and their spell lore to be really good. It’s thematic, but don’t expect pure Skryre on the top tables anymore. The Clans Moulder Ah Moulder, I’ve been looking forward to this. Every Skaven player (and every Skaven player reading this knows this to be true) wants Moulder to be good. And wit an Allegiance ability of their own and a new Battalion, this may not be far from the truth. Let’s see how they fare. Master Moulder – 100pts (New Warscroll) · Whole new unit. · Has the Packmaster whip ability. · Has a command ability that summons destroyed Moulder units to the table. · Powerful range of attacks. Games Workshop you magnificent ******. This with the Packmaster change is exactly what Moulder needed. A powerful support hero that can hold his own with a command ability tailored the clan he belongs to. 10/10, great work. Packmasters – Remained at 60pts, now per Packmaster due to being a unit. · Can now be taken in groups of up to 3. · Same whip effect as the Master Moulder. · Lost a few weapon options. Packmasters now come in… packs? Neat and fun, I like it. A neat and expendable option to roam the table following Ogors and Abominations while the Master Moulder does Master Moulder things. Rat Ogors – Remained at 100pts · 6+ changed to unmodified 6 to hit. · Attacks generate additional hits rather than additional attacks. Nothing significant changed, just rules tweaks for consistency. Hopefully see more use with buffs and their own allegiance rules. If I catch anyone taking these because they have a shooting attack their house is getting shot with a Plagueclaw. Giant Rats – Remained at 60/200pts · Horde bonus now increases weapon range rather than attack bonus. This change makes sense and it’s thematic, and I suppose it’s a good thing that we won’t be seeing Moulder armies with nothing but Giant Rats. That being said, they were always a quiet favourite of mine though I rarely if ever ran them. I see them still seeing a lot of use as an annoying battleshock immune objective camper. Rat Swarms – Decreased to 60pts from 110pts · Rules updated to be similar to restoring dead models to a unit. Was cutting the cost of this unit so dramatically potentially a disaster that will see Moulder players catapulting to the top tables as they drown us in 40mm bases covered in plastic rats they bought from their local Pestilens player? God I hope so. Hell-Pit Abomination – Remained at 220pts · Avalanche of Flesh attack similar to Slaanesh Chariots impact but has a 3” range over their 1” · Warpstone Spikes enable the model to have a chance to straight up ignore magic. Solid changes to a severely underutilized unit. A powerful centrepiece of any Moulder army, I will be shocked if there isn’t at least one in all the Moulder lists to come. Clans Moudler Verdict Damn Moudler, they tweak a few of your scrolls and give you one character and suddenly you’re a real army that poses a real threat. We haven’t even seen their allegiance abilities yet. We will watch your career with great interest, Moulder players. The Clans Eshin The sneakiest come last as ever, but no one will call them the least of the lot once they’ve read these changes. Verminlord Deceiver – Remained at 300pts · 5+ ward save added. · Verminlord bravery debuff added. · Can cast 2 spells instead of 1. · Skitterleap is no longer a global teleport and can’t target models with more than 12 wounds. Necessary changes. Deceiver enthusiasts should just be grateful they came out without a point increase. Further increased survivability ensures that this master assassin continues to do what he does best, assassinate. Deathmaster – Remained at 100pts (Renamed from Skaven Assassin) · Throwing stars pop into multiple hits on 6s. · Has a LOT more attacks with Fighting Claws. Largely the same old boy by a different name. He does his job a little better now and with so many attacks with his Fighting Claws, the smart Eshin player will close this guide and start digging through the Realm Artefacts. I recommend starting with Ulgu… Gutter Runners – Remained at 60/200pts · Throwing stars pop into multiple hits on 6s. They remain the once and future premium ally choice as far as Skaven units go. No changes made, no changes necessary. Stay awesome. Night Runners – Decreased from 100pts to 80/280pts · Throwing stars pop into multiple hits on 6s. · They make a 2d6 move now after deployment rather than just a free move. Same as Gutter Runners, the only change necessary was to stop them moving 20+ inches turn one. Otherwise they’re still what they were before, a niche option but a good one. Clans Eshin Verdict Without knowing the Allegiance Abilities of Clan Eshin I’d call these the least stand-alone army with no specific spell lore. They’re niche, but I may yet be proven wrong when the rules are shown. Jesus that was a lot of typing. Tell me your thoughts, yell at me, whine that Acolytes aren’t that bad (they are that bad, shut up). All feedback is welcome as always.
  4. 22 points
    With the start of the new year, I figured it was time to formally introduce the world to my newest army and current project: The Kharadrong Raiders. No, I didn't spell their name wrong. This post will cover their conception as an army, the initial round of photography and finally the background lore I've whipped up for them. Putting the Pieces Together So, what are the Kharadrong Raiders? The Kharadrong Raiders are obviously my take on the Kharadon Overlords. When this army was first previewed last April, I was torn. A year prior I had been working on a Dispossessed force during the PMP's Budget of Sigmar Contest and I desperately shared my desire for a dwarven airship. Jokingly I said during a Warhammer Weekly: "Make it happen GW!" Little did I realize that we would have not only a Dwarven airship,but an entire faction a little over a year later. But as I said, I was torn. Despite wanting this army so badly, there was something to be desired with their aesthetic. Don't get me wrong, I like metal. I'm a dwarf player, of course I do. But I also like beards and a little bit of skin. I wanted a connection to more traditional dwarves and Barak Thryng seemed like such a rejection of this (given that is is like 1% of the total KO population). So I was on the fence and the Monopoly-man head of Brokk just pushed me over the edge with initially rejecting the army. Then I felt a little bit guilty, as one might anticipate given my prior intense desire for an army just like this. I mean, how often does GW deliver just what someone asks for?1 So, I sat down and tried to figure out how I could remedy this and make these guys work. I had also long been interested in a Fyreslayers project, and as I mused on what this could look like, Sigmar's inspiration struck! What if I reimagined what Long Drong's Slayers might look like if they were modernized and brought into the current AOS aesthetic. For those who don't know Long Drong's Slayers, Long Drong was a slayer pirate who captained his own ship and led a Dogs of War mercenary company in the Old World. I realized this project allowed all the pieces to fit together! I could do my Airship fleet of KO, have the hair I was looking for even with closed faced helms (because of the Slayer mohawks), and I could have definite ties/homages to the Old World while still being firmly seated in the Mortal Realms. I could even do a Aqysh-based force with orange glow effects (which I had been experimenting on with the Phoenix Temple models). The only challenge standing in the way of this project was cost. Fyreslayer mohawks are understandably in-demand on the secondary market, which meant that I was going to likely have to buy a whole host of Fyreslayer boxes. I lucked out when I found out that 14 mohawks came per box of 10 Vulkites. That said, to make a base 10 infantry troops for my army, we're talking about $105 MSRP retail. So I mused on it for a week or so. It was such an awesome concept that I realized I also couldn't not do it. So, I tightened my belt and got to work with an initial test model last May. Things came together better than I could have imagined. The mohawks weren't difficult to line up. Weapon conversions were pretty much snip and glue. The Bases weren't difficult to produce. And the color scheme popped! Thus I committed to the project and pulled the trigger my new army.... I've designed the project to come together in multiple flights and I use events to plan my projects. The first event on the docket was Holy Havok, the team event put on in Chicago at the beginning of November of each year. The Holy events, put on by @Holy Hammer Hern and the Holy Hammer club differ from standard tournaments in that they have a more narrative focus (not unlike RAW in the U.K.) and the Holy events are the premier Hobby events in the U.S. Steve's tables are lovingly assembled and customized to the various mortal realms. This event was a highly competitive hobby environment and the perfect place to premier the Kharadrong. My co-host @Vincent Venturella rose to the challenge and assembled his own force to pair with mine. I'll cover this event and the results of that event in a later post. Assembling A Sky Fleet So I set about finishing the first round of models. Here are the results of these first models: In the midst of this work, I experienced a setback. Literally days after I completed my second full unit, the GHB2017 dropped with the "adjustments" to Thunderers which made my unit (that I had converted to all have different poses) unplayable. It wasn't just that they got their power adjusted down; the unit I had painted was literally illegal under the new rules. The changes also threw into question the competitive viability of the whole project. To see this thing through, I would be hobbying on it for the entire year and there was a chance I would be taking a sub-par army to these events. The prospect was less than enticing and I considered scrapping the whole project. Luckily, I didn't. I loved the concept of this enough that I resolved to see it through, even if it was sub-optimal in competitive play. The silver lining was that Fyreslayers under the new system were highly competitive and their aesthetic was baked into my forces. The allies system dovetailed perfectly with the hybrid lists I was already considering. If the KO thing was a dud, I could always redirect my work to pure Fyreslayers. So I pushed through and here is what I came up with: Background Lore Now I needed a story to launch these pirate slayers into the AOS world. This is what I've initially come up with: Kharadrong’s Raiders are a mercenary band made up of the remnants of the Grimharaz Lodge, who’ve recently retaken their ancestral hold of Barak-Zharr. Their name is honorific of an ancient mythical hero, Long Drong, who similarly led a band of slayer mercenary pirates on sailing vessels to plunder and to victory. As a Dogs of War force, the Kharadrong’s Raiders have found common cause with Trapjaw’s Barnyard Busters in the mutual pursuit of gold and glory. The origin of the Kharadrong’s Raiders is a long and tragic story. Decades ago, the Grimharaz lodge came under assault by Tzeentch daemon hordes in what would later become known as the War of the Wyrdquartz. While many of the lodges held their ground, Grimharaz was at the heart of the conflict and sustained heavy losses. Despite the intervention of Kharadron Overlord fleets, the lodge’s hold of Barak-Zharr was lost under the press of daemon flesh. The remnants of Grimharaz, now homeless and hopeless, disseminated amongst the Baraks of the Kharadon Overlords and picked up work where they could find it while the Grimharaz’s Runefather, Zharrik, went into a self imposed exile. For years the remnants of the Grimharaz lodge toiled amongst the Overlords, and many served aboard Overlord vessels as mercenaries. Over time, the sons of Grimharaz adopted the means and methods of the Kharadron. They learned to sail the aethersphere under the skilled guidance of Zilfin navigators and distill the essence of aethergold from the Khemists of Urbaz. Despite their exile amongst the Overlords, the Runeson Thrundrik never forgot the halls of Barak-Zharr. Thrundrik and his trusted brother-in-arms Varag set about re-gathering the lodge with the goal of reclaiming Barak-Zharr. Even in these early stages of re-formation, Thrundrik saw that many of the younger generation had assimilated to the ways of the Overlords, while the older longbeards held strong to the ancient traditions of the lodge. To help bridge this division, Thrundrik sought out Runefather Zharrik and reunited the lodge under Zharrik, knowing full well that the tension between the new and the old could not be maintained indefinitely. But the unity held and the combined arms of young and old, aethermatics and ur-gold runes side by side, retook Barak-Zharr. Years have passed and the lodge persists amidst the tensions. New and old have found an odd peace in the firescorched halls of Barak-Zharr as ancient stoneworks have been restored and aethergold furnaces installed. The Grimharaz lodge has found unlikely allies with a neighboring Ironjawz warband led by Trapjaw but the take is good and the Orruks (or at least their lust for gold) is trustworthy enough. Recently, Thrundrik has caught wind of large remaining deposits of Wyrdquartz nearby and has sent a joint force led by his brother-in-arms Varag and Trapjaw to investigate. It was Tzeentch’s desire for Wyrdquartz that led to the loss of the Hold the last time around and Thrundrik refuses to let it happen again. He hopes that Varag and Trapjaw can get in front of this situation and maybe even make some profit while doing so. Final Descent With everything else in place and putting the final touches on my last couple units, I needed to finally bring the legendary Barak-Zharr to life. I spent most of the month of October hobbying away on my board for Holy Havok. Ultimately, I think things came together fairly well, but I'll let you judge. And the rest of the finished units in the first round of models: I hope you enjoyed this introduction to my current passion project. In future posts, I'll provide some behind the scenes glimpses while various stuff was WIP, as well as detailing Vince and I's Holy Havok 2017 experience, and I, of course, have new additions to this force I've completed in the meantime. I mean, Holy Wars 2018 is indeed coming next month! 1: In no way do I actually think that GW designed the KO for me or at my suggestion. The timing is simply humorous.
  5. 20 points
    Introduction One of the things I really like about the latest Warhammer 40,000 releases for 'The Gathering Storm' is the idea of a Triumvirate. This was a word I had not heard before and as well as sounding very cool I also liked the meaning behind it: I have also recently been thinking about backstory writing for my Age of Sigmar mixed Order army, and as I recently finished my third centre-piece model for the army (A Freeguild General on Griffon), it seemed the perfect chance to add my own "Triumvirate" into my army. The Roots of the Story: When Age of Sigmar first came out, I put together a backstory for my army called 'Siegfried's Desperados'. I had a blog on Dakkadakka which was quite popular at the time, perhaps because it was one of the safe havens away from the heat the game was getting from some disgruntled veterans (especially on Dakkadakka). You can check out the thread here if you are interested: https://www.dakkadakka.com/dakkaforum/posts/list/663727.page To summerise, the initial background I created for my army was that they were a mercenary outfit (called the 'Desperados') operating out of Azyrheim. I wanted to add a bit more grey and a bit more low fantasy into the backstory (as it was something Age of Sigmar didn't really have at the time), so I came up with some hooks and ideas of the dark side of aelven society in Azyrheim (lots of intrigue and assassinations among the nobles), the ideas of slums in the city, and that a mercenary outfit might employ a necromancer in their ranks. This was also an excuse to add in Aelves, Duardin and even Death into my army which was all a lot of fun to play with before the General's Handbook came out. But since the General's Handbook came out the narrative and story behind my army has taken the backseat. I have been focusing a lot more on Matched play and my narrative outlet has been with Hinterlands. As the recently finished Freeguild General on Griffon was meant to be Siegfried Stormhart once more, I thought it would be fun to update the story of the Desperados, and so the Triumvirate was born. The Triumvirate of Mistmire; Master Geppetto, Siegfried Stormhart and the alchemist, Massym Al-Izzar Creating a Triumvirate: I want to throw out the question to all of you, what cool Triumvirates could you add into your collection? All you would need are the following: 1. 3 Cool Models 2. A Cool Story that connects them For me, I had my 3 Centrepieces. The Griffon, the Steamtank and the Hurricanum. I wanted them to have some sort of purpose other than being in an army together, so I decided to bring back the old Necromancer I used to run in the Desperados pre-GHB. He goes by the name 'Cornacaprious'. I decided that he has since betrayed the Desperados, and has resurrected an ancient vampire (with the title of the "Blood Queen"). This gives me a reason to finally paint my Neferata model and also gives the triumvirate a goal to accomplish (they of course seek to kill both the Necromancer and the Blood Queen). So with the scene set, I put together a 4 pages as if they were from a campaign book and detailed my Triumvirate of Mistmire. I would love to hear what you think, but more importantly I hope this inspires you all to go off and create a Triumvirate for one of your armies too. My Triumvirate:
  6. 19 points
    First, let me get some disclaimers out of the way: I play Nighthaunt and Legion of Grief exclusively. I love my ghosts and rather find novel ways of playing them than chasing the meta. I have not competed in any tournaments. I have been in the game for about a year. This blog, and anything else I post, is my opinion and is only backed up by my own experiences. If you want to hear about how a noob has kept his love of the Nighthaunt alive and has won more than they have lost in their local games, then please keep reading. Welcome fellow Shepherds of the Damned I'm not going to stand here, beside you, and gesture to the war-torn battlefields after your conquest as though anything I have told you here today was why you won your battle. How you win with your processions of murderers, necromancers, and healers who drew the ire of Nagash is ultimately up to you. I will, however, tell you what I know and point you in a direction. And, hopefully, that direction is onward, ever forward, to inevitable victory. First, What the Nighthaunt Are and What They Are Not The Nighthaunt are not titans on the battlefield. We are not unkillable elites. We will never push up the middle of the battlefield and lay waste to everything in our path, nor will we ever hold territory against an unmitigated onslaught. What we are is a tactical strike force. Nighthaunt asks of you to know your opponent. They will know their own strengths; it's easy enough for any army to be fielded and do what it says on the warscroll cards. It is much harder to win against an opponent who is intent on outplaying those strengths. Sometimes it will be a clear counter; we are faster, we hit harder, or we can resist their damage. But, in most cases, it will come down to playing the objectives and keeping your opponent on the back foot. The key to winning as Nighthaunt is to know your opponent's pressure points and how to apply enough pressure, while not over-exposing your own. General Tactica Play the objectives: There are very few battleplans that require you to take on the big bad across the table directly, and those that do often have a more fair way to gain those points other than total annihilation. We are a superior army when it comes to objective claiming and defending with our quick units, teleportation, and From the Underworlds. By default, the rule to claim an objective is to simply have more of your models within 6" of the center of it at the end of your turn than your opponent does, and it remains yours so long as your opponent can't beat that count at the end of their turn, even if your models are no longer there. A battleplan has to specifically alter these rules if they require anything else --and some do-- so always be sure you are up on the objective capture requirements being used. And then be ready to abuse them. Know your tricks: Use the rules as written to your advantage. For example, most battleplans don't require you to hold an objective, just to claim it and then deny your opponent from claiming it by keeping them out of range. That could be as simple as zoning in on the objectives on turn one with From the Underworlds and then charging with everything at the enemy just to deny them getting close enough to flip the claim in the turns limit. Further, abilities like From the Underworlds and Spectral Summons exhaust movement, but aren't moves themselves, meaning you can exploit some battleplan objective rules and a few enemy movement lockdown abilities. Expand your tactics: Most Age of Sigmar armies could be classified as "Hammer and Anvil" style armies, or you will see a lot of common tactical advice given out that fall along these lines. This really isn't our style. Nighthaunt is all about tactical styles that expose and hunt for weaknesses. I will go into more detail for three styles of tactics in the Writs of the Mortarch section at the bottom of this guide. Take battalions: One or two, given points being played. In our army battalions are synonymous with specializing or equipment load-outs. They allow you to counter an enemy by choosing from a variety of benefits that usually exploit specific enemies. Does your opponent love close combat? Shroudguard is a solid counter. So is Chainguard. Does your opponent have high saves? Dolorous Guard can bring some Mortal Wounds. Battalions also have a few passive benefits to keep in mind as well; each one grants your army another Command Point at the start of the game, another artefact you can equip on a hero and the choice of placing all units within that battalion at the same time otherwise known as a "one-drop." Note that this one-drop feature does not know distance or boundary, so you can certainly split that one-drop across the battlefield and From the Underworlds all at once if you wanted. 😉 Target weaknesses: Most other armies depend on their heroes the same as we do. Units will often have banner carriers, musicians, or icon bearers. Some armies are powerful but slow, and some are fast but relatively weak. Some can lock an opponent in place. And we can exploit all of it. With our flying, we can move over and retreat through the front lines to attack a hero or general or claim an objective. We have artefacts, like Slitter, than can halve a unit under the right conditions or can target specific models. Reikenor can use his Corpse Candles on particular models to remove buffs from a unit. Spectral Summons can be used to not only pull a unit back after taking too much damage but can be used to reposition after units move and change the points of battle, or get a unit out of a lock. The point here is to know what your opponent plans on bringing, knowing what their army is known for, and being ready by bringing tools that can remove what they need working for them to win. Don't forget your own buffs: Our most essential buffs come in two forms: our heroes and our battalions. Though some units, like the Bladegheist Revenants, have built-in buffs or special effects when a specific other model is nearby, the majority of your power will come from choosing the right hero to support a unit, or the right battalion to give a benefit. I will get into more detail in what those buffs are below, but the takeaway here is that by leveraging what a hero or combination of heroes can give you will help set up your threat units. ABW12: Always be within 12 inches. If you can't do anything else, at least make sure that your units are always within 12" of your heroes. You don't really want them in combat if you can help it, but you have to keep them close. Oftentimes this means your hero will be running more than anything else, and running into position ahead of your charging units. This will put pressure on yourself to make those charge rolls, lest you leave your hero hanging in the open, but you will want --need-- your heroes giving out their Deathless saves at all times. So bring a ruler and use it religiously, and be prepared to spend that Command Point on rerolling that charge. Tools of Terror Let's get into things a bit deeper. Let's talk about what we can do. I won't get into everything, but I'll list what I think are our most useful abilities and tactics that use them. From the Underworlds They Come: Half of the units we bring to a battle can go into the Underworlds and can sit there for up to 3 turns, and brought out anywhere on the board more than 9" from an enemy. I cannot overstate how useful this is. Depending on the kind of list you want to build, you will want to either place your objective takers or threat units into the Underworlds. The very act of putting something in the Underworlds means your opponent will have to mind their own deployments lest they open up a window for you to exploit a vulnerable edge or backline. For more about this, check out Writs of the Mortarch at the bottom of this guide. Wave of Terror: This is arguably our second most crucial ability, and it alone can win you the battle or turn the tide of a losing war. Unfortunately, this sliver of Nagash's power is as fickle as he is, and if you're unlucky enough never to see it in a fight, it could cost you the game. Each time you charge, should you roll a natural 10 or higher, you trigger the ability to pile in and fight as though it was the combat phase. It's not the combat phase, however, which means that your opponent gets no counter-attack. That natural 10 is a bit of RNG, only having a 16.67% chance of occurring per throw and is not in our favor. This is why we like to build our lists with a lot of smaller units, affectionately called "MSUs" or multiple-small-units (though we will still rarely run minimums, just smaller than maxed). You will want to strike a balance between the number of chances you get to throw those dice on a charge, the amount of heroes you will want to have around to cover those units that charged and potentially spend CP to re-roll a charge, and the models you could lose in a counter before needing to return models or risk losing the unit. Deathless Spirits: As long as a hero is present, that hero and any nearby units get a save-after-save to ignore a wound on a 6. This is important since it is our only method, other than model-return mechanics, to mitigate mortal wounds and damage that gets past our unmodifiable 4+ save. As with Wave of Terror above, this ability both allows you and requires you to make choices about unit sizes. A larger unit can charge in without a hero and get by on a large model count to keep their effectiveness up, but medium-to-small sized units are going to rely on Deathless Spirits to not evaporate too quickly. You might find a tactical advantage of letting a unit or two advance without this protection, but if you are not shoring up the difference elsewhere, you will feel the loss all too soon. Flying: Flying is more than just ignoring terrain. It's also ignoring models. Nothing can get in your way when you're moving, which means that you can spend your moves getting into optimal positions despite your opponent's best efforts to screen you out. You still have to follow the basic rules of movement, can't end a move closer than 3" to an enemy, for example, but now that bubble of protection no longer forces your units to have to skirt around them to get to the other side. Just fly over. Where this ability shines the most is when retreating. Retreating is a normal move with a few caveats attached to it; you give up your shooting and charge, and you have to end outside 3" of all enemies. But that doesn't mean "away," so you can retreat right over the top of an advancing enemy line to set yourself up in their backfield or claim an objective. A couple of our units, Bladegheist Revenants and Glaivewraith Stalkers, can retreat and charge in the same turn, making them powerful users of this ability. Spectral Summons: As long as your general is alive and on the field, for a Command Point, they can pluck any unit, hero or otherwise, from anywhere on the battlefield and drop them wholly within 12" of the general and more than 9" from any enemy. The apparent use of this ability is to pull back a unit that's on the verge of being lost and heal them up from our various sources. But, it can also allow a particularly fast general, like a Dreadblade Harrows, to pop in at any open space and reposition a threat unit or objective holder. The Undying Dead We don't have an overabundance of ways to dig into the grave to grab new recruits in the heat of battle. If there was ever an argument to play Legion of Grief over Nighthaunt, this is it. But, we are not without our tricks when it comes to keeping our units full of death dealers, and when effectively used, this little bit can go a long, long way. Below I will list our sources of healing starting with the most models that can be returned, then abilities that require managing wounds, then those that only heal wounds. Ruler of the Spirit Hosts: Command Trait - D3 models to a unit within 9" of general, at the start of the hero phase. Our number 1 most selected Command Trait and for a good reason; it's free, it can't be interrupted, and it brings back full models regardless of how many wounds a model in that unit might have to heal. This is extremely powerful when used on units with multiple wounds, like Hexwraiths and Spirit Hosts, but don't let that stop you from using this to bring back a few more Chainrasps if you need to. No Rest for the Wicked: Olynder's Command Ability - 1 model to each unit within 12" per Command Point, during the hero phase. Our Lady, if she's our general, can bring back 1 model to all units that happen to be within --not wholly within-- her for a CP. This has a real trade-off: on the one hand, if she's surrounded by friendly units in the thick of battle that 1 CP can bring back a potential ton of ethereal flesh. On the other hand, if Olynder is your general and you are not running the Dolorous Guard to beef up her potential wounds, you run the risk of losing her before she could have her moment in the emerald light. And, it costs CP, which is a premium and arguably better spent on a Spectral Summons or a charge re-roll. Nimbus of Power: Black Coach - D3 models to one unit wholly within 12", at the start of the hero phase. Exactly the same as Ruler of the Spirit Hosts, but with a larger range (mind the "wholly") and from a non-hero (also non-summonable 😠) model that can change up its role from support to attack when needed. The Black Coach is already a beautiful and useful model that should appear in almost every list, but as a support piece, you can keep your units healthy in the early-to-mid game before you charge the Coach into the face of that unsuspecting guy across the field once it hits level 3+. Captured Soul Energy: Spirit Torment - D3 (or 3 if Stormcast) worth of models returned to a unit within 6" if 3 enemy models died anywhere on the field when the combat phase transitions to the battleshock phase. Or, you can opt to heal this many wounds to any 1 target, including heroes. This is one versatile ability and might merit bringing as many Spirit Torments you are comfortable with. The only drawback here is that if you want to bring back Hexwraiths or Spirit Hosts, this is the first of the healing abilities that you would need to roll a 3+ or a 5+, respectively, just to bring back one model. But, the trade-off is that you can target heroes (or other non-summonable units) for that heal, including himself. This is where things change for us. Everything above returned models without requiring you to heal the targeted unit first. For 1-wound units, the below won't be an issue, but if you plan on putting any of these supports near multi-wound units, you're going to have your hand forced. Deathly Invocation: Vampire Lord (ally) - D3 wounds must be healed if possible, otherwise worth of models returned to up to 3 units within 12" at the start of the hero phase. Why would you ever want to spend points bringing in an ally that isn't ethereal, doesn't benefit from or offer Deathless Spirits, and takes a leader slot? Because Deathly Invocation can target 3! separate units to get D3 models back. Sure, if one of those units needs to be healed first, you're doing that, but when you have two more units to target, it's not a hard choice to make. And the Command Ability: Blood Feast to add +1 attacks to a unit for an entire round helps. Spectral Lure: Guardian of Soul's unique spell - D6 wounds must be healed if possible, otherwise worth of models returned to any unit wholly within 24". Probably the very definition of risk-vs-reward for us you have here the potential of returning a full 6 models to a 1-wound unit, or even up to 2 Spirit Hosts, to a unit allllll the way over there, but on a spell that requires a 6 to cast, can be unbound, and only one attempt to cast it no matter how many GoS's you have. This would be downright amazing if it could cast on a 4, especially when comparing it to everything else listed here, but the best you will be able to do about that is spending an artefact slot on Wychlight Lantern to get a +1. As an aside, the other Guardian of Souls artefact, Beacon of Nagashizzar, can add +3 to the models/wounds returned to a unit. Still, if you're going to give the GoS any artefact the Wychlight is statistically more sound (+25% more likely to be successful after an unbind attempt vs. +3 models). Beyond this are the rest of our healing abilities. They will not return models, but they still have their purposes. Spectral Tether: Spell Lore - D3 wounds only to heroes only within 12". Lifestealer: Spell Lore - Deal D3 wounds within 12", caster heals that much. Feed on Terror: Heal 1 wound to a hero within 6" of an enemy unit that fails battleshock. An unfortunately rare occurrence nowadays, but worth keeping in mind. Harbingers of Grief They don't have any choice but to heed Our Lady's commands, but that doesn't mean we don't have a few stand out heroes that put in the extra effort in the field. Knight of Shrouds on Ethereal Steed: Needed for the Forgotten Scions battalion, and one of the leader options for the Shroudguard battalion. He can spend a Command Point to grant a unit +1 attacks. This ability can only be used in the combat phase, but it can be yours or theirs, meaning you can pump up a few units for a counter-attack your opponent might not be expecting. In terms of firepower, this is the best buff you can bring in most cases. It will have the most impact on units with low to-hit/to-wound attack profiles. Even more so with units with double-digit model counts. Knight of Shrouds (on foot): Also one of the leader options for Shroudguard. He can spend CPs to give every unit in a bubble around him +1 to hit. This is stackable, so 2 CP is +2 to hit within that bubble. A great hero to pal around with Dreadscythe Harridans or Myrmourn Banshees to get their enhanced damage profiles through. Reikenor the Grimhailer: The last of the options for Shroudguard and one of the best wizards in the game. We don't have great spells, but there are a few you'd want his ability to get either a +1 or +3 to cast on, like his Wraithstorm spell, Lifestealer, or the endless spell Chronomantic Cogs. More importantly, his Corpse Candles target specific models, so you can spot-remove a banner carrier and rob an opponent's unit of their buff. Guardian of Souls: Necessary for the Chainguard battalion and is a wizard that comes with the only model-return spell we've got, Spectral Lure. Give him Spectral Tether, and you've got a dedicated healer. Too bad there's unbinding likely, and unless you give the GoS the Wychlight Lantern artefact there won't be much to ensure the cast. He's got a passive +1 to Wound bubble, though. That's... helpful. Dreadblade Harrows: You get two of these in a box, which is great for the Forgotten Scions, but unless you run that battalion, you'll only need one. He makes a great general thanks to his teleportation ability, so he can stay safe, show up to use a command trait like Ruler of the Spirit Host, cast a spell if he has the Midnight Tome artefact, or use the Command Ability: Spectral Summons to teleport units to him. He breaks the game in terms of mobility and objective capture, especially combined with From the Underworlds They Come. Spirit Torment: This pretty much rounds out any of the "must-have" heroes. Necessary, along with Chainghasts, for The Condemned battalion, Mr. Torment also brings a passive re-roll 1's to hit for any units within range of his 12" bubble with Nagash's Bidding. This might not seem like much at first, but any units swinging with high attack profiles, like Spirit Hosts with their 5+/4+, will get more benefit from this buff--which is free and always on--than they would from an extra attack that costs CP. Even more so for any unit that wants more 6's. Bladegheists get it even better, getting a re-roll misses buff with him nearby. Additionally, he brings Captured Soul Energy, which is one of the few healing or model-return abilities we have that can't be interrupted (the others being Ruler of the Spirit Hosts, the Black Coach, and Olynder). It triggers if at least 3 enemy models were killed in a round by the time a battleshock phase starts, and if so, heals either D3 (or 3 if those enemies were Stormcast) wounds or models to a unit within 6" of the Spirit Torment. Very versatile, as you get to choose if you want to heal or return models even if they're damaged, or you can opt to heal heroes, and the whole bit works whenever three enemies are killed, so even in your opponent's turn. Note that it can only trigger once per turn per Spirit Torment, so if you want more than D3 models returned this way, bring another ST and kill another 3 enemy models. All the rest of the heroes, including Olynder, are situational at best and filler on the shelf at worst. The Lady herself can dish out a fair amount of mortals at a short range consistently, and her shooting is an ability so it can be still used after a run. Kurdoss Valentian is a beat stick, just in case you need hero support while directly targeting the enemy general, and his ability to steal CP is minimal. Lord Executioner is hard to kill, Tomb Banshee can scream at low Bravery targets, and the Cairn Wraith is so cheap he can just be there to make sure your out-of-pocket units can have Command Abilities options and their Deathless Spirits save. Those Who Are Tormented Let's briefly touch on each of the units that have notable roles in our army. Battlelines Chainrasp Hordes: The two primary purposes of these little guys are to hold objectives and to swarm enemy units. On their own, their large unit sizes can mean that they are a lot to chew through and can buy time even with no hero support. In smaller numbers and with hero support, they can easily put out good damage. They have a built-in buff to reroll Wound rolls of a 1 if there are more than 10 in a unit, and that alone is reason never to bring less than 20. Grimghast Reapers: The Reapers primary purpose is to target enemy hordes, getting free re-rolls against 5 or more models. But, thanks to their long-range weapons and easily fighting in two ranks they are great against even elite units, provided you can max your potential attacks using that range. They are expensive, though, putting less wounds on the table for the points than Chainrasps. But they are also faster and deadlier. Spirit Hosts: These multi-wound ghosts have three primary purposes, balancing their risk and reward options. Their high attacks count and Frightful Touch mean they can reliably damage targets with high save values more so than standard attacks; 2+ enemy saves mean nothing with a lot of 6s. Their large base sizes make them for an excellent hero screen. If you are willing to pile 6 of these guys together, then you also have an objective camper not likely to give up its spot anytime soon. With any of the model-return abilities available to us that don't rely on wounds, you can make a big enough blob of these immortal. Hexwraiths: Until recently, our calvary battleline was nothing to look at. Effectively a quarter of a Spirit Host in every way except speed, you would be forgiven thinking these guys are best left in the stables. They see new purpose within the Dolorous Guard, however, as the battalion abilities grant extra health for a general on a very reliable 2+ roll, and boost their wound and mortal wound potential on a charge. With their two wounds each and packs of 5, they are great for quick objective grabs and holds or hero hunting while waiting for support to arrive. Others Bladegheist Revenants: Your baseline threat unit who can do amazing damage, retreat and charge in the same turn, and who's built-in buffs might just be overkill. This unit doesn't need any buffs to perform well (other than charging), but any hero can only help them do better. It's good to keep in mind that they could have some Chainghasts nearby for the buff without a Spirit Torment even on the board, but if you're going to invest in any elites for the support I'd go with a hero to grant Deathless Spirits. Dreadscythe Harridans: With a little support, these ladies can do more damage than the Bladegeists, but require at least +1 to hit from a Knight of Shrouds (on foot) to match them. This makes them carry an intrinsic cost: 1 CP and a KoS to match Bladegheists, 2CP and a KoS or 1CP and a Knight of Shrouds on Ethereal Steed to outperform them. If you have CPs to spare, then Dreadscythes can pack a surprising punch. Their debuff of -1 to hit for all enemy units within 3" seems great, but when you factor in that it only works on enemies with a natural Bravery of 6 or lower, it won't find much use. Myrmourn Banshees: A threat unit that is the epitome of risk vs. reward. They can unbind or dispel as though they were wizards, with a +1 to the unbind for every four models in a unit. It's short-ranged, though, only working within 18" for the unbind and 6" for the dispel, but if either is successful, the Banshees buff themselves +1 attacks (the dispel does D3 damage to the unit, so without healing you'll lose models). In terms of damage potential, 12 of these ladies can outperform 20 Bladegheists with just that self-buff alone. This scales quickly with any more buffs you can toss their way. Chainghasts: I talk up some Hexwraiths, but wait until now to even mention Chainghasts? You'd think that as our only non-hero ranged unit, you might want as many of these guys as you could, right? Especially considering our only other units with range are Lady Olynder, the Black Coach, and Tomb Banshee? Well, not exactly. You're not going to pack more than 4 of these to a single unit, and unless they become much cheaper, you're probably not going to try to bring more than what's required for The Condemned battalion. In the ranged department you're looking at 15" and wildly swingy D3 attacks each. However, they do have a trick up their sleeves with in melee: they get 1 attack per model within 2" when they are activated. What do you do with that? Well, if you charge these guys into a horde pack and determine you've got some 10-15 attacks, why not use that 2" reach and slam them all into the hero standing next to them? Still, without some assistance to their ranged I feel these guys are a bit one-trick and easy to snipe. Another Link in the Chain is great for when you want some Spirit Torment buffing but can't fit another one into your list, so that's something to consider. Glaivewraith Stalkers: You've got, like, 30 of these, right? Sorry about that. They shoved handfuls of these in Storm Strike, Tempest of Souls, and Soul Wars starter sets, so most players will have an abundance of these guys. I won't harp on them and say they're literal trash, they can be converted into Reapers after all, but they aren't great. They do have some redeeming qualities to keep in mind; they are cheap, come in units as small as 4, have 2" range that can add up if you have a lot of them, they can retreat and charge in the same turn, and re-roll failed hits if they've charged or been charged. Despite this, they will do a massive 50% less damage than Bladegheists if the gheists charged that turn. Worse, this gap only lessens to 30% if Bladegheists didn't charge. Their battalion, Death Stalkers, doesn't help this situation much either, buffing that 50% deficit to 30% of charging Bladegheists (or breaking even if the 'gheists didn't charge), but only to one enemy unit for the entire game. You really might want to convert these or wait for them to get a Dolorous Guard of their own. Battery-Powered Curse Hearse Does the Black Coach deserve its own section? You bet your sweet Necromancer and/or Vampire that's bound, gagged, and chained in the back it does! This beautiful, ornate, gloriously gothic centerpiece is what the Nighthaunt are! I mean, look at it! Name a more gorgeous thing. I dare you. I'll wait... Nothing, right? And it's a great unit on top of that. The Black Coach Aesthetics aside, what you have here is an excellent support piece that can transition into several roles as you see fit, giving you some proper dynamic choices through the course of a battle. It's not a hero, so it won't be giving out any Deathless Spirits saves, nor is it "summonable," which is the keyword all our troop units have that allow our healing-mechanics to work. So, its healing is going to have to come from itself or a Spirit Torment (see how versatile they are?). Thankfully, it can do just that. Evocation of Death is the primary ability that powers the rest of its set. Roll 3 dice at the start of each battle round, no matter who's going first, and look at the results. Each 4+ is a level gained for Evocation of Death, and each turn, you have three more chances to add additional levels. Nimbus of Power is the first level and instantly sets itself as another Ruler of the Spirit Hosts as well as a self-healer. This is already amazing, but wait, there's more. Unholy Vigour, second, which allows re-rolls of 1 for all its melee weapons (all of them, horses too), and it can now run and charge in the same turn. Spectral Scythes is the level you will want to wait for before you put this thing into combat. This level empowers the Coach to let you pick a unit within 1" after it charges and roll a die and on a 2+ deal D3 mortal wounds to it. Insubstantial Form, fourth. Now it can retreat and charge, which it absolutely should. Witch-fire is fifth. Just start burning everything within 3" of this thing every hero phase by rolling a dice for each enemy unit in range and on a 4+ deal D3 mortal wounds. This is a lot, and combined with its other abilities like Frightful Touch on the Reaper Scythe and Relic Bearer's Spectral Claws, and Reaped Like Corn (which is only on the Scythe), and the option to bring the Soulreach Grasp, you might be asking just what are you supposed to use this thing for? Behemoth in Battle The Black Coach has three primary uses, any two of which you will choose for its life in the game; Corpse Cart and either Soul Sniper or Reaper on Wheels. Corpse Cart: In the early phases of the game, the Black Coach supplies you with another D3 of uninterrupted model-return. If you intend on layering this with other model-return abilities, you've got a strong support structure to keep behind your front lines while not risking putting your general in harm's way. There's too much firepower building up to keep the Black Coach behind forever, but don't begrudge the effectiveness of using it to zone-out flanking attacks, shepherding units as they push forward, and providing a target to shoot at that's not your other threat units. Soul Sniper: Going this route means you elected to take the Soulreach Grasp instead of the Reaper Scythe, which will give you a ranged option for the shooting phase. It's only 10" and a single attack, but it has -3 rend and D3 damage. Not bad since you get to use this twice (shooting and combat phases) even if engaged, but not likely to mean much without a buffing hero nearby. This can be the better setup if some high-save enemy units are advancing on you thanks to that -3 rend, but unless you can reliably land those Grasp attacks you'll want to keep the Coach at range and keep healing, which unfortunately means losing out on the rest of the Coach abilities. Reaper on Wheels: This route means leaning heavily on the Reaper Scythe and the collection of other abilities to do a ton of damage before the poor thing gets inevitably blown from the field. Almost all of the Coach's powers are melee-centric; the Reaper Scythe being the only weapon choice to benefit from Frightful Touch and Reaped Like Corn, and the rest of the kit wanting to hug enemy units. Knowing the Coach can eventually run and charge, moving anywhere between 15" to 20" if not too damaged, then you simply hold it back until level three, and then bring it into combat. Level three will take two turns, on average, which is plenty of time to see where things are lining up on the field. At that point, target that ranged squad in the back, the melee unit that's punishing your threat unit, or an exposed hero and snap the reigns. If possible, keep it within a friendly hero for Deathless Spirits, or a friendly unit for Nimbus of Power. Which is better? When comparing the Soulreach Grasp vs. the Reaper Scythe you're only talking about a single wound in favor of the Scythe on average, assuming you're attacking twice with the Grasp and the only buffs come from Unholy Vigour and Frightful Touch. The gap increases to 2 wounds if Reaped Like Corn can be used. What this means is that it's a matter of time. The Grasp has a chance to do less damage over time, but at range, while the Scythe will do more damage but only in direct combat. The break seems to be about 3 rounds. Any less and the Grasp wins assuming you got at least 1 wound at range. More than 3 and the Scythe wins. All To Come Within the Fold So we've covered all the units that could be considered Nighthaunt Proper that's wholly within the battletome, but for those wanting to shine their Nightmare Lantern's alluring light into other "realms," you can call upon a few more lost souls. From Forge World, you can snag the Mourngul. From Warhammer: Underworlds, you can recruit the Briar Queen and her Thorns. Forge World Mourngul: From GW's resin model store Forge World you can grab this guy. It has rules and points, so it's a legal model, but there are some tradeoffs for not coming from GW's mainline. First among them are the points; this tall boi is the most expensive single model you could put on the table, even more than the Black Coach. Second, for all those points, you're getting a warscroll card that has seen a rewrite to nerf it in a pretty substantial way. Lastly, to offset the power the Mourngul previously had, it's a Monster and not a hero. A few armies have abilities and attacks that get buffed when targeting a monster, and not being a hero means no Deathless save and no potential artefact. This means that despite its strengths, you are either throwing it away as an expensive distraction or supporting it with a hero, or in the very least, Shademist or Mystic Shield. Monsters also can't benefit from cover, but Nighthaunt can't do that anyway, so that's not a loss. But, what this model can do, in addition to becoming the de-facto damage magnet as soon as it's on the table, is bring sweet, sweet bloody carnage. It's fast starting at 12", has a 2-Mortal Wound Frightful Touch, starting with eight attacks with which you could get those MWs, and the second-best natural attack profile we have to back it up when you don't score those MWs. Oh, and it can heal itself D3 wounds if it killed anything via Devourer of Flesh and Souls to try to stay at its top profile, and has a passive -1 to hit rolls for all enemy models within 6" with Ghastly Apparition. Note that this last bit is models, not units. Ghastly Apparition will shroud any friendly units you have palling around with the Mourngul too, so long as they originate within that 6" bubble. Drop the Mourngul with From the Underworlds on some unfortunate unsuspecting target, nail that charge, and revel in piling bodies, especially so if that target is already engaged in a fight. Underworlds The Briar Queen: From GW's sister game Underworlds, you can pick up the warband Thorns of the Briar Queen and use those models on the table with rules that aren't too bad. The Queen and her six unique Thorns come as a set, meaning that for the slightly inflated cost of a hero, you get a free screen as well. The Briar Queen herself is a wizard and comes with the spell Howling Vortex which is a tactical choice of a spell to be sure. With a casting value of 7, 18" range that targets a spot on the table, and 6" area of effect from that spot, you can splash any number of enemy units in that radius with this spell. You then have to roll 2d6 and either beat each enemy unit's movement characteristic or roll a double, and if so, they suffer 1 mortal wound and have their movement cut in half. If you can pull this off, half movement can be a nice way to buy some time on a unit or several units that are more than 12" out, but this quickly loses its usefulness once the threshold for a reasonable charge roll is crossed. She can back up her spell with three ranged attacks at 10" on 3's and 3's with 3 rend (one damage each, ha), and whip in melee once at 3", on 3's, 2 rend, but D3 damage. All in all, there's a lot to the Queen that can be useful, but you'll be hard-pressed fitting her in anywhere that another hero wouldn't be more helpful. The added tax for her Thorns doesn't help this, either, as though they provide a useful screen, they are just Chainrasps that retain their rerolling wound rolls of 1 if two of the six are still around. This doesn't make her terrible, though, just tactically challenging. If she can slow even one fast unit down with her spell or hide behind a durable screen for a couple of shooting/combat phases, she could easily be worth bringing. Processions, the Jailed Forced to March We have a total of 9 battalions and 2 super-battalions. That's...a lot. But, as I have been stating throughout this guide, our battalions are less army-wide buffs as they are configurations that allow you to build up specific tactical advantages for several units of our army. I won't get into all the battalions here, but I will highlight a few of my favorites. Also, remember that any battalion you take is also another Command Point at the start of the game, as well as an artefact you can equip on a hero. The Dolorous Guard: One of the three new battalions the December White Dwarf magazine gave us, this battalion delivers two utilities for the price of one. The first thing it does is allow your general, whoever it may be, to enjoy a pseudo-wound pool of +20 at the minimum. It does this by allowing you to redirect wounds your general takes to any of the Hexwraith units this battalion requires. The requirements are simple; at least 2 units of Hexwraiths, at least one of them 3" or closer to the general when it takes any damage, and a 2+ roll right after a failed save. Suddenly Lady Olynder can be a centerpiece threat unit again, carrying within her retinue 27 wounds at a minimum that she could heal up with a Command Point. Other generals would make great use of this, as well, like the Knight of Shrouds on Ethereal Steed, but I'll get into that at the end of this guide. The second thing this battalion does is give those Hexwraith units a buff on the charge, granting +1 attacks to both the scythes and the horses. At first, this might seem lackluster, but statistically, this makes a pack of 5 Hexwraiths just over half the effectiveness of Spirit Hosts with their Frightful Touch, but with much more movement. Combined with the right general, that effectiveness skyrockets past Spirit Hosts and can make for a terrifying offensive line. This mega-wound general and all the mortal wounds you could want make this battalion great against heroes and high save elite units. The Forgotten Scions: The other regular battalion from the December White Dwarf requires you invest in a Knight of Shrouds on Ethereal Steed (which you should be taking anyway) and two Dreadblade Harrows. At first blush, this might feel like a hefty tax having to take an extra DH that you wouldn't dare put into combat, but I challenge you to look into the utility of this battalion instead of its threat. First off, this battalion grants that KoSoES a passive +1 attacks to his sword, and it also allows free use of his Command Ability once per round. This increases his damage output significantly, and potentially his healing as well thanks to Sword of Stolen Hours, and also the damage of the units around him. But, this entire battalion can be one of the most versatile utility battalions we've got. Slap a couple of key artefacts on those Dreadblades, and you have spot support magic (Midnight Tome and Shademist), movement buffs (Pendant of the Fel Winds), or an artefact carrier that you can keep out the danger of battle (Aetherquartz Brooch much?). The Emerald Host: The only super-battalion I'll get into detail here, this is the third of the offerings from White Dwarf. I only want to point this out because it's cheap, and requires no more than the taking of both battalions above to unlock it. What it does is give an enemy hero of your choice a permanent -1 save from all attacks that target that hero. This can be devastating on the right target, bringing some enemy's +2 save up to a +3 and netting a whole 50% more potential damage on it. Also note that this debuff comes from all sources that are "attacks," not just from your army. In most cases, that might not make much of a difference, but in a team or multiplayer game, you just brought a powerful debuff everyone benefits from. And, though I'm not aware of any abilities acting this way if your enemy can damage themselves for a buff and that counts as an attack, well that's debuffed as well. This, a CP, artefact, and one-drop option on the other two battalions above? Not bad. Not bad at all. Shroudguard: For such a simple battalion, the net benefit of it cannot be understated. Two units of Bladegheists, our baseline threat units, get a Frenzied Fervor save of 5+ instead of a Deathless Spirits 6+. What does that mean? It means your 16.67% chance to ignore damage doubles to 33%. In a game of dice and random numbers, giving two of some of your best units a 33% chance to just totally ignoring incoming damage is nothing to scoff at. It's no wonder you see this battalion everywhere. It does have some drawbacks to note, however. It's still a Deathless save, so you still need a hero nearby to grant it, and you need the hero you chose to include in this battalion to see the Frenzied save. A hero that, by the way, doesn't benefit from that tasty save he's handing out. Despite that, this battalion is excellent for some good ole' fashioned warmongering and tieing up some enemy threat units. Deathriders: I'll mention this one only briefly because it sees some competitive play, though I expect that to change a bit with the Emerald Host. With this battalion, your Black Coach, two units of Hexwraiths, and a Dreadblade Harrow or two all now get to nail Wave of Terror on a natural 9 instead of a 10 on a charge roll. This buffs the chances of WoT triggering up to 27.78%. Oh, and they all get a +1 to charge rolls. I mean, when you absolutely, have to, gotta, need to slam that Black Coach into someone's kneecaps from across the board, this battalion can't be beaten, but I'll argue you'll have a better offensive chance and output with an MSU army and spending those Dreadblade points in Forgotten Scions. The Condemned: Now, have you ever looked at your two packs of 20 to 40 Chainrasps and thought to yourself, "I think these need to kill more?" Ever wondered what would happen if you could shove all of them into a wide enemy front line and then grab all your dice, and all your opponent's dice, just so you could roll all the attacks? Then this is the battalion for you! The buff this battalion gives is simple; Chainrasps can now reroll all failed hits if wholly within 15" of a Spirit Torment or Chainghasts. That, combined with the Chainrasps built-in buff to reroll Wound rolls of 1, and you got yourself one of the best damage dealing battlelines out there. Use this battalion to target armies that bring very big bad units, but not a lot of individual units. You can potentially tar up a couple of enemy units with one large blob of these guys, and since you're required to take two, you might tie up an entire army advancing line. This battalion loses its effectiveness if your opponent brings a lot of units to the table, though, and even more so if they are fast. If that's the case, you're better off with a maxed Reaper unit. Chainguard: Personally, I have found the utility of this battalion to dwindle as of late, but I'll mention it here because it still serves a purpose. Like The Condemned, it requires two units of Chainrasps with anywhere from 20 to 40 models in them. And, you're taking a Guardian of Souls (and, if you're listening to me, giving him the Wychlight Lantern). Now, any time the GoS's Spectral Lure spell goes off on one of the Chainrasp units, an additional D6 models return. This sounds great for plopping down on an objective, or as a thicket of brambles to choke an enemy into a bottleneck, but it suffers from the same issues the GoS himself does. Namely, this entire battalion requires you to not only be able to get a casting value 6 spell off (I wonder what could help that?) but that it's also not unbound. I suppose if that all works out, you have 2D6 Chainrasps coming back, but only to one of the units. Even if you brought multiple GoS's that spell can only be attempted once a turn. My point here is that you don't want to play a game of attrition as Nighthaunt, we're not equipped for that. As shock troops, you need to get in there, steal your objectives, and deal damage to key targets. This battalion does none of that. The rest of the battalions are situational at best. The Execution Horde helps the already hard-to-kill Lord Executioner be even more hard to kill, which is great if you need to hold the line but falls short unless you're pairing it with any of the whole-model-return abilities (not worth-of-models) and effectively taking them away from where they might be more useful. Death Stalkers grant an enemy unit a debuff of +1 to hit and wound against them, but only from the Cairn Wraith, Reapers, and Stalkers in this battalion. And Shrieker Host forces enemy battleshock rolls of 1 to be re-rolled and prevents Inspiring Presence. If the majority of our enemies didn't already have either a great Bravery characteristic or battleshock immunity abilities, this might be more competitive, but as it is, I don't think it's worth taking when we have so many better choices above. Lastly, the grand super-battalion Nighthaunt Procession reeks of the old age of this battletome, but it didn't age as well as the rest of it. All it does is turn Deathless Spirits into Bound Beneath Indomitable Will, which sounds cool as hell, but only drops "wholly" from the save range. I suppose that's powerful enough on its own, if very outdated when compared to recent armies, but by the time you could field a Nighthaunt Procession, you're likely going to have the hero cover you'd need for Deathless anyway. As a reminder, you are tailoring your battalion choices to your opponent's weaknesses. My quick impressions on them here are only surface level. Know your battalions backward and forwards, and you will find yourself selecting the perfect counter. I might have put down a few battalions here as worthless, but they really aren't if they exploit an enemy. I've seen a Shrieker Host dominate, once. Just once. But you get the idea. Spells in the Wake of the Necroquake When it comes to spellcasting, Nighthaunt could stand to have a few more options. While we have a few stand-out Spell Lores we can choose from, our Endless Spells belong on the shelf and far to the back. I'll go over our wizards, their casting options, our spells, and some generic Endless Spells that you might want to consider. Wizards Reikenor the Grimhailer: If you're going to invest in a spellcaster, Reikenor might be at the top of your list. He's no slouch with his Fellreaper if you need to swing it at an enemy unit with 5 or more models in it, but it will be his Corpse Candles that will seal his seat on the court. Corpse Candles allows him to deal 1 mortal wound to either any specific model within 12" of Reikenor or to himself, and if that wound ends up allocated either gain a temporary casting bonus of +1 or +3, respectively. The immediate caveat of this ability is that the damage must take, so if your opponent can shrug the damage or Reikenor himself makes the Deathless Spirits save that he has to attempt, then there's no bonus. But, the hidden power of this ability is in the selection of enemy models; you can select a unit's icon bearer or musician and snuff them right out of the pack, taking their buffs with them. Reikenor also brings his own unique spell Wraithstorm, which on a 7 will do D3 mortal wounds to a unit within 12", and if it kills a model will trigger another D3 mortal wound one more time. Lady Olynder: Of course, Our Lady is on the list. She's a level 2 wizard, which means that she can cast and unbind twice. Olynder also comes with her own unique spell Grief-stricken, which on a 7 will make an enemy unit within 18" have to subtract 1 from all their hit rolls, while also granting +1 to all melee weapons that target them. Unfortunately, Olynder does not have access to access to any casting bonuses, so even her own spell is a hard cast with a high chance of failure. Still, her other abilities can more than make up for this slap in Our Lady's face, provided you can keep her safe enough to use them. Guardian of Souls: The last of our allegiant wizards, this is also our only unnamed one and means that you can assign an artefact to him that neither Reikenor or Olynder can have. The GoS has access to a set of artefacts that are unique to him: Lightshard of the Harvest Moon, Wychlight Lantern, and Beacon of Nagashizzar. If you have been following my hints elsewhere in this guide, then you know that I think that Wychlight is the only real option, and maybe now you see why. Casting bonuses come very rarely to us, and an extra digit on the die roll can make all the difference. Vampire Lord (ally): It's worth mentioning the Vampire Lord. Since he sees a lot of play as a Nighthaunt ally, it's fair to point out he's a wizard, too. Though he does not have access to any of our Spell Lores, he could attempt a generic Endless Spell if he wanted, but more importantly, Mystic Shield will always be in his spellbook. Spell Lores Soul Cage: A tactical spell if there ever was one with two effects baked in, Soul Cage can be a nasty bit of magic in the right spot. For a casting value of 6, a unit within 12" loses its ability to retreat and must now wait until the end of the combat phase before it can fight. Going "at the end" means it's likely that the unit you're targeting won't be able to fight back until after the two or more units you just shoved in its face have had a swing. But this spell can also buy time, which sometimes is all you need. You could breach an enemy's 3" bubble in some way, like via model-return, and then lock that unit down with this spell. Spirit Drain: What Spirit Drain is, is easy to cast. On a 4, within 18", roll a die for every Wound characteristic your target has, and for each 6 give out a mortal wound. Considering that's only a 16.67% chance, per die, to do damage, you won't see this spell taken very often. Still, feel it out if anyone tends to bring a double-digit Wounds hero to the table. Lifestealer: With a casting value of 7, you'll probably find it's the best on Reikenor. It's just a D3 of mortals within 12", but it returns that much to the caster. Snuffing those candles on himself doesn't seem so bad of an idea anymore. Nailing the cast and preventing the unbind with his bonuses make this almost his sure-pick spell. Reaping Scythe: Now, this is an underestimated spell. Casting value of 4, so really reliable, and it gives any single weapon the caster's holding re-roll both hits and wounds until the next hero phase. Mitigated by the fact that it only targets the wizard who cast it, the only native wizard who'd benefit from it is Lady Olynder, and oh does she ever. Re-rerolling fails on her Staff of Midnight, when combined with the rest of her damaging abilities, makes her into a curb-stomping Queen. With the Midnight Tome, there are a few other heroes who might like this spell, too; Knight of Shrouds (either one), Spirit Torment, or even Dreadblade Harrow. Shademist: Since, as an army, we will want to focus on staying alive, and in the fight, Shademist is likely the superior spell for any wizard who's not Reikenor or Lady Olynder. Maybe even if they are. Casting on a 6, a Nighthaunt unit wholly within 12" gains a buff of -1 to wound rolls for all attacks that target that unit. Not a lot of abilities buff wound rolls out there, so this tends to be a harder counter to taking damage than -hit effects. And, having it doesn't preclude Mystic Shield or All-Out Defense from also being used for extra protection. To give you an idea of how powerful this is, a reduction of 1-to-wound is about 25% less damage on average coming in. Spectral Tether: If it weren't the only spell that we have that can heal heroes, I'd say this was a hard pass. Casting value of 6, 12" range, and D3 wounds, it's not a lot of healing when compared to the myriad other ways we can put wounds back into a unit. But, since this can only work on heroes, and our heroes lack sources of healing, this becomes a spell to factor. I would bring a Spirit Torment, instead, unless this spell were going to a Guardian of Souls. Captured Soul Energy can't be interrupted, after all. Endless Spells First, a word of advice: If an Endless Spell has a casting value of 6 or less, it's fair game, though you may want a Guardian of Souls with a Wychlight attempting it. However, if you're looking at a 7 or higher, save that for Reikenor. There are a few reasons for this; you want an initial casting roll that's good enough to cast the spell, you want an unbind that's more likely to be higher than your opponent can roll, and if they are spending casting slot on dispelling it that's one less spell they can cast that phase. Chronomantic Cogs: Well, of course! Why? It's so much utility in an itty-bitty, casting value 7, package. In fast mode, everyone gets +2" to movement and +2 to charge rolls. Yes, your opponent, too. But, this allows our already fast units to get down the battlefield that much faster. On average, our units will move 10", and is arguably more bang for the spell than your opponent will get seeing as how you'd use it on your turn first. The charge roll bonus also allows any of those units you just dropped in From the Underworlds now make contact on a 7. In slow mode, this allows your wizard to cast an additional spell and re-roll saves. Don't repeat a common mistake, though; wait until you're ready to move up the field, drop from Underworlds, or have a lot of charging you need to make before setting up the Cogs. The longer it's out, and speeding up time, the longer your opponent can use it, too. Prismatic Palisade: Wait, hear me out. Cheap, 5 on the casting roll, and it's a big ole bright wall you can put between you and their ranged units. It's complete cover if a 1mm line from the center of any of their bases passes through the Palisade on the way to the center of yours. Sure, they'll move around it on their way to get to you, but more importantly, they'll have to. And maybe get blinded in the process. There's a lot of ranged units out there, at least make them work for their shots. Aethervoid Pendulum: Yeah, I'm upset Shyish Reaper is as bad as it is. Know what isn't? This. Sure, it costs more, but it's slightly easier to cast on a 6, does more wounds, and is much less likely to get in your way. It just moves the direction you set it unless it doesn't. Emerald Lifeswarm: Want another source of model-return? For a casting value of 6, you can set this down in the thick of your army and watch it return D3 models to one unit within 1" of it. It's predatory, so unless you want to see it start fluttering toward your opponent, you'll probably want to go second once you get it out, but that's not such a bad thing if you're combining a lot of other model-return abilities along with it. Better, you can also park it in your backfield and use Spectral Summons to pull units back to heal up. Either way, this allows us to be a bit more resilient if you think it's worth the cost. Geminids of Uhl-Gysh: This one might be a sleeper hit. Little tricky to set it up with it's 18" range and requirement to be tethered to each bit no further than 6", but if you can manage it, each one will do D3 wounds to whatever they pass through. But, even better, one of the Geminids will debuff the unit -1 attacks, and the other -1 to hit, and can provide a considerable survivability buff to friendlies in the area. It's a casting value of 7, so it may be best to attempt it with Reikenor, just in front of a screen of soon-to-be charging ghosties. Balewind Vortex: Imagine how funny it is to see Reikenor sitting on top of one of these. You and your opponent will be laughing. He'll stop laughing, though, when your Wraithstorm now has an 18" range. Or maybe you cast Balewind and then with the extra spell cast it gives you, cast Geminids at 24," and that wipes the smile off their face. Soul Cage, Lifestealer, or Shademist all at 20"? With a casting value of 6, you can let anyone try to cast it, but as always, Reikenor is your best bet. This Endless Spell grants the wizard atop of it an additional spell attempt and +6" range to whatever they cast, and +1 to Saves. You're not taking this why? Oh, because it's an instant kill for your wizard if you don't adequately protect him and we're ethereal so that Save bonus means nothing. Relics Primed for Corruption I have a few artefacts that have become favorites, each with a utility that I think benefits a Nighthaunt army in some novel and meaningful ways. As an army, you can choose whatever your home realm is and gain access to that realm's artefacts in addition to any that come with Nighthaunt. You also gain access to any artefacts that exist in the realm you fight in, should you and your opponent decide to fight in one. This can potentially give you two realms of artefacts to choose from and can compliment Nighthaunt artefacts nicely. Nighthaunt Only Shadow's Edge: Frightful Touch on a 6, but D3 mortal wounds instead. On any hero you can pump up the number of swings on; this can toss some excellent saveless damage. Slitter: After picking this weapon's carrier to fight, but before they pile in, select an enemy model within 1" and roll a dice. If higher than the model's Wound characteristic, that model dies. Use this after the enemy unit has attacked so that they can no longer move for the rest of that phase. If the model killed breaks up the unit more than 1", it is out of cohesion, and additional models have to be removed until it is back in cohesion. Play this smartly and slice units in half. Be aware that abilities or effects that modify the characteristic count toward the total, but damage does not. Headsman's Judgement: +1 to hit and wound rolls for one of the bearer's weapons. Simple yet effective. Midnight Tome: Turns the bearer into a Wizard granting one spell/unbind, and a spell from Nighthaunt Spell Lore. The unbind alone can be worth it, but a well-placed Shademist is even better. Pendant of the Fel Wind: The bearer of this artefact grants +3" of normal movement to all Nighthaunt units wholly within 12" at the start of their move. This means you can move the units that are near the bearer first and give them the extra movement, and then the move the bearer closer to another set of units, and they can then be moved with the extra movement as well. We're already fast, but with this, we're dogs after a bone. Excellent when combined with Flying and getting over those screens. Realm Artefacts Aetherquartz Brooch - Hysh: Whenever you spend a Command Point roll a dice. On a 5+, you get another new Command Point. In an army that starves for CPs, this is an auto-pick for me. Lens of Refraction - Hysh: A powerful defensive artefact that benefits more than just the bearer. Whomever you give this to now has a 6" bubble that will reduce the mortal wounds enemy wizards dish out with spells. Each time mortal wounds would be suffered, roll a D3 and reduce the amount by that result. Spells that deal 1 mortal wound will always be negated, while up to 3 is possible for each instance of a spell. Combined with "within" and not "wholly within" this can give you a leg up against spell-heavy opponents. Coming from Hysh is a boon here, since you will have access to it and the Aetherquartz Brooch above for coming from, or fighting in, the same realm. Gryph-feather Charm - Ghur: -1 to be hit, +1 movement. Taken more for the reduced hit chance than the movement, it can help a needed hero or general stay alive. Gildenbane - Chamon: All other artefacts within 3" are depowered. Shut down an enemy artefact? I can think of a hero or two that could make use of this. Miasmatic Blade - Shyish: -1 to be hit. Same as the Gryph-feather Charm but without the movement. Same reason to take it if you find yourself on Shyish. Sword of Judgement - Ulgu: A modified hit roll of 6 grants D6 mortal wounds, but only against heroes or monsters. Pair with a Knight of Shrouds on foot, and for every CP spent, this range increases by 1. 3 CP would mean a 3+ on a roll is D6 mortal wounds. If you've got the CP to spare and need that monster dead, why not? Talisman of the Watcher - Ulgu: Another defensive artefact that can help out more than just the bearer. This one grants a free Mystic Shield-like effect to any 1 unit within 9" of the bearer at the start of the combat phase, so long as the bearer is not within 3" of an enemy at that time. You only get the one selection, though, so while you can choose this in every combat phase (yours and your opponent's), you will need to either select a unit your hero is supporting, or the hero itself, but not both. This can save you some much needed Command Points either way. Architectures of Torture Next, let me touch on a few things I'd want you to keep in mind as you tackle the challenges of enemy armies and tactics. These are a few guiding principles that have seen me to victory more often than not, and I hope they do the same for you. Always do this: Use From the Underworlds for at least one unit: You never know when an opportunity might show up, and just having something in reserve can save a bad game or keep an opponent too worried to commit fully. Build your list with a focused goal: We are often not considered competitive or tournament-level because we suffer from the "one list does not fit all" problem other armies with above 50% win-rates don't have. Don't try to do too much with a single list. Instead, focus on a clear goal, like objective claiming/holding, and hone your list to support that goal. Moreover, having a clear plan means that when things go wrong, you still have sight of your goal and can more easily get back on track. Mystic Shield: Cast this whenever you aren't casting Shademist or another spell. Mystic Shield is very powerful for us, and it helps it's easy to cast. All-Out Defense: An excellent substitute for casting Mystic Shield if you can spare the Command Points. Consider Some Tricks: All-Out Attack: If you have the Command Points, re-rolling 1s to hit can be a snap damage boost. This is best when used on units with high attack profiles, or any units that'd like to see more 6's. Underworlds Chainrasps: A standard strategy is to put one or two units of Chainrasps into the Underworlds to drop on an objective right away. Careful with this, because if your units are too small or not supported with a hero, you might have thrown away your units for not much gain. Harrow Hopping: Another classic strategy is to use the Dreadblade Harrows to teleport to a position and, if he's your general, spend a Command Point to Spectral Summons a unit onto it. Great for holding objectives. With the Forgotten Scions battalion, you can update this strategy to use both DHs to claim a couple of objectives until danger gets too close, and then drop some Chainrasps or other units out of Underworlds. DHs are also great if carrying support artefacts like the Pendant of the Fel Wind and Midnight Tome, to hop in for some support wherever it may be needed. Cheap Hero Hunting: Two 5-man Bladegheist squads with either a Spirit Torment or a Chainghasts unit can be a cheap set to drop from Underworlds. If you can set this up twice, you can snipe an enemy backline. Vicious Spell Eaters: A pack of Myrmourn Banshees can dispel an Endless Spell at the start of the hero phase (Designers’ Commentary, July 2019) as if they were wizards, but will suffer D3 mortal wounds for doing so. The buff they receive from this, +1 attacks, is not contingent on taking the damage or losing models, so if you pair them with a model-return mechanic that operates before the combat phase you can get those models back with the buff, since it's the unit receiving the buff and not the individual models within it. This means you could dispel an Endless Spell, even your own from the previous turn if you had to, and shrug the wounds or reverse the damage via any of our model return abilities, and then attack in the combat phase with a full unit of +1 attacks. You can even use this to your advantage "moving" your screamy sisters closer to an enemy unit or up the board by returning the models in any configuration that supports both the ability used and unit cohesion. Olynderbomb: (600+ points at the time of this writing) Expensive and requires Lady Olynder to be your general, but combining her with the Dolorous Guard is an efficient way to put a threat on the field. You can either set this down on an objective and challenge your opponent to remove you, or you can drop her from the Underworlds to wreak havoc on dangerous targets. Knightbomb: (520 to 840+ points at the time of this writing) Starts out less expensive than an Olynderbomb, but can balloon if you want to invest in it, and leaves your general with a better Command Trait. Take a Knight of Shrouds on Ethereal Steed as your general, give him Shadow's Edge for mortal wounds or Headsman's Judgement for normal wounds, and Dolorous Guard for health and mortal wounds. This will save you a few points but net a similar, close-range experience to an Olynderbomb. If you take Forgotten Scions to give the Knight an extra attack and to spend his free ability on himself, as well as spend a CP on either Hexwraith unit, you have a mortal wound nuclear bomb that funds itself. Reikenor the Unending: Grab Reikenor, Balewind Vortex, Chronomantic Cogs, and Lifestealer. Snuff a candle on Reikenor use the bonus to get up on the Vortex. Snuff another on himself and cast Lifestealer at 20". On the next turn, snuff another candle on Reikenor and put down the Cogs. Turn them slow. Snuff another candle on himself and cast Wraithstorm at 18". Follow up with another snuffed-on-himself Lifestealer at 20". At worst, Reikenor will have 3 wounds on him, but more likely less. Now from turn 3 on, you'll have 3 spells to cast, one of which should be Wraithstorm, the other Mystic Shield at 24" on something, and the third Lifestealer. Measure things out carefully to stay out of danger, and balance the Corpse Candles not to kill him. And then, when ready, turn the Cogs fast and land your charges. Artefact Shutdown: For a nice distraction, a Lord Executioner with his own 5+ Disembodied Skulls, in addition to the 6+ Deathless Spirits, can be hard to remove. Give him Gildenbane from Chamon and shut down an enemy artefact for as many rounds as it takes to kill him. Vortex Bounce: There is an initial extra boost to spell range when you cast Balewind Vortex. You cast it 1" away from you and add the huge base of that thing because it is now treated as your casting model. That's an additional 5" you can sneak out of it on top of the innate 6". Also, when it gets dispelled, you set up a whooping 6" away from it. Because it's a set-up and not a move, you do not count as having retreated. A great way to get your caster out of a fight they can't win and still be able to charge to where they can. Bonus points if you let your Myrmourn Banshees do the dispelling. (credit to The_Dudemeister for this one) Writs of the Mortarch Lastly, a few list-building tips and strategies with examples that I hope will help you firmly set your position as a Mortarch of your own sect of Nighthaunt. How to build a Nighthaunt List Step One - Goals: Start any list-building venture by first thinking about what you want to accomplish. This is by far the most critical step because if you are not clear on what it is you want to do with your list, you will find yourself making sub-optimal choices to fill in gaps and rushing to create lists that don't really accomplish anything. Setting a clear goal not only means having a sharp idea of what you want to do with your list, but it also challenges you to evaluate each choice you make for their individual merits, as well as their contribution to obtaining your goal. You might think that your goal is obvious: to win. But that's not going to be good enough for our kind of army. Your opponent is going to want to win, as well, and will be bringing tools to the table to do just that for themselves. Instead, your goals need to be more precise than that. Here are a few examples: Capture Two Objectives on Turn 1, Hold Two Objectives for at Least Three Turns, Take an Opponent's Objective, Eliminate a Certain Enemy Hero, Eliminate a Certain Enemy Unit, Eliminate the Enemy General, Defend Two Heroes for at Least Three Turns. A good source of goal ideas are Hidden Agendas, too. Whether or not you actually use them in a game, they can be great guiding ideas to shape your army around. Your games are going to be a combination of at least two of these goals; primary and secondary. All of your goals should absolutely be your driving force in the game, so don't discount the "secondary" as any less important. Calling one primary and other secondary does have a benefit, though. Your primary goal is going to be your direct tactic while your secondary is going to be your indirect tactic. When you build your list, your primary direct tactic is what you are going to be spending your game achieving while your indirect tactic is going to be what you use to assist your primary. In terms of the kinds of units that translates into, if your primary direct tactic concerns objectives, build most of your list to allow you to take them and keep them. If your primary direct tactic is to hurt enemy units, take more units that can deal damage and meet the enemy on your terms. The rest of your list should support your indirect tactic. Your goals are also going to be informed by your available models, the points limit of the game, your tactical prowess, and your opponent--any of which may or may not be known to you before showing up to play. More importantly, by selecting your goals first, you will already start making choices about how you are going to build to achieve them and know what to do when you encounter your opposition and setbacks. Step Two - Tactical Structures: There are many styles of tactical play available to Age of Sigmar armies. Hammer and Anvil, for example, is a very popular choice for most armies given its real-world historical significance and ease-of-use. Though there is no wrong choice in tactics if you are having fun playing, there are certain styles that work better for us than others. Let's detail three of these styles and how they pertain to Nighthaunt. Hammer and Anvil: This tactic gets all the fame and glory. It is the most basic and straightforward of the army-style tactics, can be deadly offensively, and can dominate the field defensively. It's also the most adaptable tactic to the large swath of army types available to play. If you are paring up against an opponent who knows their stuff, chances are you will see a variation of H&A. The concept is simple; the bulk of your force is comprised of either a lot of wounds or a lot of armor, a thick shield of toughness that acts as a solid platform--an anvil. The rest of your army is comprised of a highly mobile--or ranged capable--hammer. The anvil serves as a stationary or slowly mobile fixed force that ties up enemy movement through combat. Once engaged, the hammer comes sweeping in to slam upon the opponent from the other side. The opponent, then, is caught between the two forces and is left with a bad situation. It cannot run because of the anvil, and it cannot stay and fight because of the hammer. However, this technique has a downside that Nighthaunt makes evident either using it or playing against it: Hammer and Anvil tactics rely on some kind of overwhelming power. You either need to greatly outnumber your opponent and tie them down or greatly out-fight them while you've got them. Anything less and you will have a crippled army trying to defend a losing position. As Nighthaunt we simply lack a sturdy enough of an anvil to make great use of this tactic; our best saves are 4+, our most wounds are Chainrasps, and our best fences, Spirit Hosts, are just too expensive. But, for our opponents that happen to use H&A, our creative uses of Fly, Underworlds, and Spectral Summons can render an anvil useless giving us a huge advantage against it. Envelopment: The Macedonians created H&A and then the Romans perfected it. But then Carthage comes along and decimates it with this tactic. Envelopment doesn't rely on anything overwhelming at all to get its job done. Instead, this tactic focuses on exposing weaknesses in an opponent's army, and targeting in a more direct way their lifelines and advantages. It works by first identifying your opponent's likely strengths--such as their their H&A tactic--and avoiding them altogether. Envelopment is synonymous with "flanking" and opts to ignore the more heavily-guarded or deadly front or advancing side of an army and sweeping around the side to strike at the meaty sides and rear. This is generally done with a H&A-style deployment, but the anvil in this case is purely a diversionary device. It gets the attention of your opponent long enough for you to drop or maneuver your more killy units around the side. The advantages of this tactic are that it requires far less of a body count to be effective, you usually have clear lines of retreat or regrouping should you need it, and a confused or off-put opponent who now needs to hurriedly plan their next move. However, a high degree of coordination is required to make this tactic work, which means more extensive planning and forethought. Also, if you are unable to establish an element of surprise in your opponent, you could be setting up your threat units to get wiped from the board. Pincer: If H&A is considered to be a brute force tactic, and Envelopment might be considered dirty trickery, then Pincer should be considered elegance in motion. Older than both the tactics I described above, this tactic was first outlined by Sun Tzu. You know, the guy who wrote The Art of War in 500 B.C.? You might have heard of it. "When your quarry goes to ground, leave no ground to go to." "What is of supreme importance in war is to attack the enemy's strategy." Sun Tzu wrote the definitive structure of war for any army who does not want to, or cannot, strike from a position of ultimate power. Sun Tzu wrote a book about tactics that are tailor made for Nighthaunt. In fact, I might even go so far as to say that when Nighthaunt were designed The Art of War might have been the inspiration. As such, I believe tactics such as Pincer are our superior mode of choice. Fundamentally, Pincer is a lot like Envelopment, but instead uses two or more maneuvering elements. Instead of sweeping around to one side or another, you move your units in from both sides, or all angles, to encapsulate your opponent's resources or threats. This works perfectly with Underworlds and Spectral Summons, allowing us to stage our mobile and bloodthirsty units in out-of-the-way locations, if even on the table, until they are needed. You can lean on the diversionary tactic of Envelopment to try to set your opponent off-foot but you don't rely on it, needing it only to pull your opponent out of formation and exposing one or two angles of vulnerability. This means you can set up your pseudo-anvils or posture like you are using Envelopment, and if your opponent catches on and neutralizes them your true Pincer tactic comes into play to make them pay for it. The simplest way to engineer this strategy is to place your diversionary units or mobile screens on the field while you place your threat units into reserves. You then push forward with your fielded units, knowing full well they are temporary, before summoning in your reserves to deal out the devastating damage a bit later. The advantages of this tactic are that it is quick to set up, is flexible enough to adapt to most situations, and can provide an effective and damaging response to any pain points. The disadvantages, however, are that this will require planning several steps ahead of your opponent, careful coordination of all your units, and the potential of over-committing units to a lost cause. I have a clear favorite here, but all three tactics are certainly viable for use on the table. Selecting one early and adapting it to your goals will allow you to make better decisions about the following steps. Step Three - Troops: The backbone of any good team is not the leaders that lead them, but the team members who put in the effort. An army is no different. Now that you have a clear goal in mind, your troop choices become much more manageable. If, for example, your goals were to take a couple objectives by the end of turn 1 and then hold them for as long as possible, you might already be looking at large blobs of Chainrasp Hordes and Spirit Hosts to put in the Underworlds, or Hexwraiths to move and run up the board. If your goals are to fight for objectives and defend the objective holders, then you might lean more toward Grimghast Reapers and Bladegheist Revenants as damage dealers and Glaivewraith Stalkers as cheap objective holders. Your troop choices need to reflect your goals. Reject anything that doesn't fit. Step Four - Heroes: Heroes are our linchpins, but not so much so that you should be building your list around them. There will be scenarios in which you will design hero-centric lists--an Olynderbomb being a good example--but in a competitive sense, your heroes are best thought of as your support structure and not your primary focus. They are the bones underneath the muscle. They should come fourth in your decision-making process. You need heroes for Deathless Spirits saves, a few bring buffs to enhance units, and they are your only source of healing and model-return mechanics. But, except in the rarest of cases, none of them will be the unit that wins the game. It will be the troops they are supporting that do that. So, make choices that compliment the troops instead of the other way around. Spirit Torments are great with Bladegheists, other heroes, and the Black Coach. Knight of Shrouds on Ethereal Steed is great for anything that wants to have more attacks. Knight of Shrouds on foot is great for anyone not already swinging at 3+ or better. Guardian of Souls for clutch casting or his +1 to wound rolls. Depending on your point limit, you will have a hard cap on how many heroes you can bring, and my rule of thumb is to take that limit and subtract 25%. That means for a Vanguard (1,000+) match aim for 3 heroes, and for a Battlehost (2,000+), aim for 4. This allows for some room for customization without running too few heroes. If, after your 3 or 4 Nighthaunt heroes, you want to grab a Vampire Lord, go for it. If you wish, you can spend those points on a battalion. Or slot in another hero. Step Five - Enhancements: By now, you should have a firm idea of what your list is going to do. You have your goals, the units that will achieve those goals, and the heroes who will back them up. Now, it's time to think about enhancing them. Battalions, although important, fall into this step. So do Endless Spells, terrain items, and supplemental unit choices. None of the options at this step should be the decision that makes or breaks your army. Instead, they should be the kinds of choices akin to sharpening your weapons or reinforcing your shields. Your game shouldn't hinge upon if you took Shroudguard, or if The Condemned vs. Chainguard was the better use of Chainrasps. Dolorous Guard might be your key to keeping your general alive, but your list can't depend on the DG to succeed unless that was your primary goal. These enhancement choices should give an already formidable list an edge that's needed to secure a win. Final Step - From the Underworlds: Finally, you've got a list of ghostly delights, and it's time to think about how you are going to use them. You aren't done building an army until you consider the pre-game and early-game tactics you will employ utilizing that army. A good deployment can just as easily win you the game as a bad deployment can lose it, and you could have crafted the perfect list only to see it swallowed whole by a wrong decision you made on turn 1. From the Underworlds is going to be the most reliable tactic, hands down, you can use to protect yourself from a bad start and take an advantage in the early game, and this final step is going to try to teach you how to use it properly. Final Step A - What's Going into the Underworlds: You get to put half of your units into the Underworlds, but you're going to want to select which ones and how many do so carefully. Again, refer back to your goals. The units that support your secondary goal are likely going to be the ones you're going to want to put into the Underworlds. For example, if your primary goal is to eliminate at least two enemy units and your secondary goal is to cap objectives by the end of turn 1, you will want to put the objective takers into the Underworlds for a quick drop while your threat units engage and tie up the units you're targeting. If your goals are the reverse of this, then put your threat units into the Underworlds to drop down and distract your opponent while you march your objective takers up the field. Refer to Step One - Goals section again to decide which goals to focus on and how to build a list to support them. Final Step B - When To Deploy from the Underworlds: You have until the end of your movement phase in the third turn to drop units you put in the Underworlds. This gives you plenty of time. Once again, your goals are going to dictate when you're going to drop the units you put in reserve. Objective takers, for example, you'll likely drop turn 1. Defenders, attackers, strike units, or an Olynderbomb, might wait all the way until turn 3, or whenever the timing was right. Underworlds is a tactical choice, and so will require both planning and patience. If you are unused to From the Underworlds and tend to feel exposed, practice with objective holding or light skirmish units until you feel comfortable enough to place high-value units there, and adjust your goals and lists to support that. Sample Lists and their Goals And now for the section that everyone's been waiting for; just what does all this fancy-talk of building lists actually look like. I'll include a few examples here, each that I consider to be of a competitive level. This means that I've played the list more than once and it won the majority of the time. This also means that these examples are snapshots in time; they worked for me and my local meta and at the points they currently are. If and when points change, or the meta changes, this section will fall out of date and may not be as valid. I will try to keep it updated. Woe to Those Afar Our Lady of Grief (Olynderbomb) The Emerald Host (Knightbomb) Pressing on the Pain (Pincer tactic) Portraits of Grief As a bonus, if you ever wondered what this pontificating Mortarch might model and paint their army, catch the gallery below. 💀☠️⚰️
  7. 19 points
    The Troggoth Hag is definitely a piece I believe every Troggoth army needs. It's amazing as a model and amazing on the table. I rarely do such detailed eyes and faces but when working on a model that is the centrepiece of your army you want to spend some extra time just to make it special. This is surely the best work I have ever done on a models face and I think there is just a lot of character and emotion on the model. My smaller Troggoths are just green and blue but for this model I felt like it really needed another color to make it pop more so I asked some people what would be best and after many recommendations I decided to go for a nice bright orange and I think it really fits nicely. This picture also shows well the addition of mushrooms all over the model. Even though my Troggoth army is based on swamp themed bases with lots of water effects the mushrooms really tie it to my Grots and Squigs that are based on more rocky bases but with lots of mushrooms. The base on this model was definitely one of the most fun parts of the process of creating it. Here we see a detail shot of the base with the small Free Guild soldier hiding from the lumbering Hag. I love the base I did here. The water effects came out nicely and the base that comes with the Hag looks really nice after I added all kinds of fun stuff like mushrooms and skulls to it.
  8. 19 points
    The Protectors of the Candle "We protect the light in the darkness." — motto of the Protectors of the Candle. Like any other major city of Order, Port Stellis is governed by a Conclave composed of representatives of the various factions, guilds and corporations of the city: the aelf corsairs, the miners' syndicate, the knights of the Order Serpentis, the astromancy guild, etc. Each of these groups seeks above all to protect and develop their own interests. As a result, there are often rivalries and tensions between them. However, there are two factions that do not participate in this game of political influence because they exist primarily to fulfill a duty: the Stellar Champions and the Protectors of the Candle. The first are stormcast eternals stationed in a fortress on the edge of the city and they live to accomplish the mission that the God King has given them. They are not involved in Port Stellis' internal affairs and will only intervene in cases of war or chaotic corruption. The latter are none other than the city watch who ensures security inside Port Stellis. They are men and women who have chosen to enlist, wear uniforms, enforce laws and maintain public order. While it should be prestigious role, it is rather an ungrateful and dangerous job. Soldiers with several years of service are generally considered particularly tough and stubborn. The budget allocated to the city watch is very limited, so the hierarchy is forced to be cheeseparing over every expenses. For example, the uniforms are all the same size, each soldier having to sew it up if necessary. In addition, the city watch is lacking men, especially for a city the size of Port Stellis, which makes the work considerably more difficult. And as if that wasn't enough, the soldiers' pay is rather poor... Nevertheless, the inhabitants of Port Stellis must admit that without the Protectors of the Candle, the city would quickly fall into anarchy. Isilde Brumehaut "We're not giving up ground! Hold your positions! And remember: we protect the light in the darkness! Let's show them what we've got! For Port Stellis! For Sigmar!" — Isilde Brumehaut The Commander of the Candle is Isilde Brumehaut, an upright soldier descended from a noble lineage of azyrite origin. Not only does she command her soldiers and supervise the security of the city, but she also serves as a member of the Conclave. While she never falters in her task and never loses her seriousness, the days spent arguing in endless debates in the Conclave and mediating conflicts between guilds make her regret not being on the field as a normal soldier any more. Her desk is invaded by staggering piles of administrative paperwork that seems to renew themselves every day and her drawer is filled with migraine medication... But sometimes, when the city is in danger, she can gladly abandon her administrative duties and lead her soldiers into the action along with the champions of Sigmar.
  9. 17 points
    So, for my current project I plan to customise my sylvaneth and wanderer army. And what is an army without some awesome big bad boys...or ladies Drycha is one of these awesome models. And I always wanted to have a celestant prime in my army. But since the style of the original model doesn't fit so well with sylvaneth (at least thats my point of view), I started to build my own one in sylvaneth style The base of the model is build from the Drycha set. I rearranged the leg and arm parts for a more epic pose. I exchanged the torso and head with some leftover bits from Morathi. The weapon is supposed to be a big hammer, but I'm not quite happy yet. The basing should resemble the celestant prime pose - some magic lifting her in the air. I used the whirlwind parts from the Yncarne (40k), which I will pimp with some leaves to look like a autumn storm InShot_20180527_222204552.mp4 I plan to build a modular base, so I can use both the oval base for Drycha or a treelord/lady and the big circular base for the prime. More updates will follow soon
  10. 15 points
    With this model I wanted to make it as different from the original Forgeworld model as possible. So it seemed obvious to have its mouth filled with squigs at the point just before spitting. Looking at the original model it is based on a frog or toad with a lot of loose skin around its throat, which when full would be greatly expanded. So I set about converting the model buy chopping away the mouth and resculpting the lower half of the face. I am happy with how the squig turned out and thought that it still needed some converting so I cut the grot off the top and added him to a flying squig, something that I had wanted to built for a long time after seeing Ricky Fischer's conversion years ago. Sculpting the throat asing lots of balls of green stuff to ensure an even sculpt. Comparison with the original model. Squig faces yet to be sculpted. The finished model with a crew of four which were included on the scenic base as the crew and squig are counted as one model. This was great as it facillitated the narative. Squigs sculpted to look as if they are trying to escape from the squigs maw. I used green stuff to make press moulds from the squigs' faces supplied with the model, these were then cast in green stuff and blended into the Squig Gobba's throat. Thanks for looking. comments and feedback always appreciated.
  11. 14 points
    This weekend is the South Coast GT and I have finally managed to complete all of the models for the Omniscient Oracles Battalion. It was a fun painting challenge and I developed quite a few cool tricks to help get through them in the time span and keep the models to an acceptable quality level. I used a lot of spray can work to get the base coats done and then dry brushed and washed a lot to get the variation in texture. I then went over the top with the brush to pick out specific details, but only in key areas. I discuss the techniques a lot more with Ben and Mark on Ep 153 of Bad Dice if you want more details. Link is here As ever if you have any questions put them in the comments and I'l be happy to answer them!
  12. 13 points
    A blog entry which collects all the background and photos of my Freeguild Army. It will collect the posts from my painting log thread into a nice blog post! Towards the east of Ghur lies a region of deserts. They are greatly affected by the unstable magic of other realms, an effect I termed Realm-Bleed during my travels. The northerly desert is an icy, stone-strewn tundra where little thrives. The magic of Shyish bleeds into the northernmost edge of this tundra, ensuring that which does survive the sparse wilderness is truly hardy and fearsome to face in combat. The southern desert is a sandy region where waves of dunes ripple across the horizon. This desert is hot, and the further south one travels, the greater the effects of Aqshy Realm-Bleed. The two deserts are split by a strip where, against all odds, life thrives. This tropical oasis features a vast lake and rivers that feed farmlands before reaching the Eastern Sea. To the north and south of the bountiful lands are the Twin Jewels of the Deserts - Kislavia and Ajier. Kislavia is the city that lies to the north of the oasis. Its people are rugged and used to fighting the cold. They are experienced hunters and have tamed a number of the fearsome beasts that inhabit the northern tundra. While the majority of the population live in the city of Kislavia, there are a number of nomadic tribes that roam the wasteland for food, as well as dangers in the form of monsters and enemies. The tribes can be distinguished by the colours of the tassels their carry. Some tribes specialise in archery, others in trade, while a rare few focus on taming the wild creatures of the tundra. In times of war the tribes will band together to protect Kislavia. These occasions see a formidable force of spearmen, archers, handgunners and beast-riders marching in unison. These dangerous times even see marble-clad remnants of Sigmar's Stormcast and the reclusive Rieklings, or Ice Goblins, join the tribes of Korgoria to protect their lands. Tribesmen Freeguild General The Kalisha tribe is one of the main tribes that make up the Kislavia population. They live a nomadic lifestyle in the region surrounding the capital. They specialise in archery and hunting. Often they will hold archery competitions, both on foot and on horseback. The targets of these challenges range from small, speedy hares to larger beasts like thundertusks. The tribesmen can usually be identified by the pale tassels they wear on their helmets or their immaculately kept bows and quivers. The huntsmaster I met hunted alongside a large hawk who could spot a moving hare from a mile away. He was a stern drillmaster, and often surveyed his men to ensure they were operating perfectly. His right hand was missing its little finger, and, though its disappearence was never explained, I do believe his bad-tempered hawk was responsible. Kalisha Archers Kalisha Archers Closeup The Tradiki tribe are a gregarious tribe famed for its diplomatic ties and trading links. Rivalry does occur douring peacetime between the Tradiki and the Kaslisha, due to the former's desire for technological progress and development, and the latter's wish for traditional arms and rituals. Despite this, there have been numerous occasions where the tribes unite to fend off a greater threat. The Tradiki are identifiable by their ponchos and woollen gloves. They contribute sharpshooters specialising in the use of handguns to Kislavia's armies. Their technology is acquired through trade with Kislavia's Sky-Dawi Enclave. Tradiki Handgunners Handgunner Champion Handgunners Surveying Ammo-Runner In times of great danger the tribes of Kislavia will band together to defend their territory. In these cases specialists from each tribe form units, such as the Kalisha forming groups of archers and the Tradiki forming units of handgunners. Less experienced members of each tribe will join mixed groups of spearmen. These diverse units can even feature some of the braver Ice Goblins from the more civilised tribes that trade with the Tradiki. Spearmen from various tribes Champion Front ranks raise shields! Ice Goblin Allies, an unlikely source of allies that joins the Kislavian forces in times of great danger. The Ursaria tribe is the smallest of Kislavia's Great Tribes. However, it is one of, if not the most, influential tribes in the region. Its members are renowned for their taming of the greatest predators of Ghur's tundra. The tribe will bring its heavily armoured lancers and their ferocious Ursus mounts to battle in Kislavia's defense. A regiment of Ursus lancers is a truly terrifying sight, with both rider and mount working in unison due to their mutual respect. Ursus Lancers Ur-Sak Boris is the leader of the Ursaria tribe. He is easily spotted with his bright red robes and his pristine gold armour. Many legends have been created by the great warrior, his gleaming white blade - Fang - and his enormous mount Kariina. Kariina is a great urserine, a species related to the ursus. Urserines never stop growing, therefore their size is a great indictor of a specimen's age and exerience in battle. Kariina is huge, and those who are not wary of her will soon be crushed beneath her tremendous hooves or savage teeth. . Ur-Sak Boris on the great Karina.
  13. 13 points
  14. 13 points
    As some of you may know I've been at this for a fairly long time now, converting and making news things is the main lure of the hobby for me and I'll fit games in around that. However there are times that I get stuck in the void between projects where I am starved of inspiration and desperately need something to spark off a chain of ideas that can form the basis for my themes. To do this I often start trawling around various blogs and websites in search of something that clicks into place, or wander the exhibit hall at warhammer world searching for a model, component or bit of scenery that I can build my own ideas around. I'm glad to say that this works 99% of the time, and since I have for years been an inspiration leech off of others works I figured its about time to pay some of that back into the community. Below are most of my conversions for the last two years, I've left off the Suneaters as they can be found in the rest of this blog, and the latest Idoneth because I have a live thread in the painting and modelling section for them. This isnt me saying "I'm so good at this, you must learn from me", its my way of paying back all those who have inspired me throughout the years that hopefully anyone searching for a glimmer of inspiration can see some of my old works and make a newer, better and more cohesive idea based off of them. I have explored maaaaaany army in the last two years, in part due to the rich tapestry that is the potential of age of sigmar and in part because my partner is overly supportive of my hobbies, I tend to avoid chaos as I like it more as a taint on an otherwise differently inclined faction rather than a thing as a whole but otherwise have explored most races (barring dwarves, cant get behind converting them for some reason). So thanks for reading, and feel free to browse what is a massive photo dump to follow, feel free to ask any questions and I hope if you're seeking inspiration there's something there to spark it.
  15. 13 points
    Hi all, Here is the story of the first strike of the Knights of Azyr Extremis Chamber followed by a ton of photos of them in all there glory, I hope you like them. "At the same moment as Traylorn was battling the Changeling for control of the the Celestial Compass Dracothions rore could be heard all over the Celestial Realm of Azyr. The great Drakes rore was followed by the sound of a thousand chambers coming to life. First forged for the Knights of Azyr was Lord-Celastant Branatar Drakerider of the Extremis Chamber, once a Wild man in the Realm of Ghur, Sigmar himself heard his plea for vengeance against the Chaos Gods. Branatar himself never speaks of what lead to his hatred of Chaos other than to say he won't rest till all traces of them have been banished from the realms forever. Just as Archaon was instructing his Varanguard, so was Sigmar instructing the Knights of Azyr Extremis Chamber. “Drakesworn!... The compass could be our undoing, in the Archaons hand it could cement his victory at the Aightpoints. Find it or destroy it” Many battles they fought, over six Realms they campaigned, the Drakesworn Temple Annihulus, many stood in their way friend and foe alike. Nothing could stand in there way not Realmgates, Stormfronts or even Fire and Brimstone. Even in the battles they didn't win they ensured that the enemy were whipped from the field. In the end the Celestial Compass was in the hands of the Spiderfang Big Boss Chitinous Scuttlefang, who tore it from under the nose of Kairos Fateweaver and the Gautfyre Skorch Enginecovens of Clan Skryre before they even knew they were a threat. Chitinous Scuttlefang new not the power or worth of the Celestial Compass, he cared not for the lives that were lost fighting over its control so tossed it into the Arachnarok nests hidden in the Underway. It lays there now hidden from the gaze of Archaon, whose wrath could be heard all around the Varanspire" This whole bit of my Stormhost was a complete labor of love to get finished, lots of late nights painting green but it was totally worth it now they are all done. Having played a few games whit them now I have to say they are a brutal force to fight with, Fulminators are very quickly becoming my favourites. They kill Bloodreavers by the hand full. On to the photos. The first Extremis Chamber of the Knights of Azyr Lord-Celastant Branatar Drakerider. Drakesworn Temple Annihulus The Dracothion Guard. Thunderwave Echelon Lightning Echelon. Tempestors. Fulminators. Concussors. Desolators.
  16. 13 points
    Greetings everyone, I have something to share with you all today which is very special to me as I have put a lot of work into this. I present my gaming supplement for Age of Sigmar titled: Hinterlands: Skirmish Campaigns in the Mortal Realms - Version 1 Here are some screenshots of what to expect: This is a supplement to play narrative skirmish games in Age of Sigmar, and I've tried to make it look like the real deal. Enclosed you will find not one, but two campaign systems outlined. The first (titled 'The Hinterlands Campaign') is akin to Mordheim or Frostgrave. Players can create a Warband of a dozen models and battle it out for treasure, gaining skills and experience but also running the risk of injury and death on the way. The rules for the Hinterlands Campaign are 4 pages long. Just like the core rules. This is not meant to be Mordheim transplanted into AoS, but a skirmish system that embraces everything I love about Age of Sigmar. You'll find Battletraits, Artefacts, and Time of War rules all have a place in the system. On top of that, the book also introduces a second way to play; the Realm Master Campaign. The Realm Master Campaign is an additional 2 pages of rules (plus a custom battleplan to set your imagination off) and details how to run an RPG set in the Mortal Realms. It is akin to D&D or Warhammer Fantasy Roleplay, but is a simple system set firmly in Age of Sigmar at the same time. I would love to know your feedback and thoughts on the rules contained. And if you want to use them, please do! This is what they are here for! I plan to work on this book further by adding in a hobby section with example Warbands and also a Warband Roster to help manage your games. If you have any more ideas please let me know. Here's the download link: Hinterlands: Skirmish Campaigns in the Mortal Realms - by Sam James <- Download Link Enjoy!
  17. 12 points
    Over the years I've painted multiple undead armies, including several Tomb Kings forces. It's kinda my jam. Then they went away. Tomb Kings were crushed. Generic undead armies were ... well ... made 'meh.' Nighthaunts were cool but not really my giggidee. Flesh Eaters? Nah. Not really undead in my book. Now we have Bonereapers. Utter control. Cold calculation. Enforcing of a dominating will. Bones. Hell yes. This blog will journal my experience with the Ossiarch Bonereapers over the next few years. I encourage you to view it and share your thoughts. Critique is welcome! I've posted some photos in other threads, but I'll post them here as well. I'm experimenting with colors, but right now I'm leaning toward the red guys as my primary legion with the green and purple as support legions (lore to follow!). Anyway, here are some early shots. I'm looking forward to sharing this journey with all of you.
  18. 12 points
    Here’s my finished Frigate. Finally got the basing sorted and I’m pretty happy with the result.
  19. 11 points
    Hey guys, I first posted a link to AoS Reminders 3 months ago. At the time, it only supported Sylvaneth and Seraphon. I'm now happy to announce that we now support the following armies: Armies Beastclaw Raiders Beasts of Chaos Daughters Of Khaine Dispossessed Everchosen Flesh Eater Courts Fyreslayers Gloomspite Gitz Gutbusters Idoneth Deepkin Ironjawz Kharadron Overlords Khorne Legions Of Azgorh Legions Of Nagash Nighthaunt Nurgle Seraphon Skaven Slaanesh Slaves To Darkness Stormcast Eternals Sylvaneth Tamurkhans Horde Tzeentch Features Added Endless Spells Added Spells Added Realmscape Spells Added the ability to select multiple allies Added the ability to hide certain rules Similar rules are now merged to save space Sylvaneth rules are updated to 2019 I've been lucky enough to get a lot of help from some people here on TGA and over on Reddit. With 13,000 pageviews last month, this tool has taken off in a big way. The UI Selecting your army The generated reminders What's next? We're going to finish off adding spells for all armies. We are just missing Idoneth Deepkin at this point. We're going to add Grand Alliances for soup armies We're going to add Mercenaries We're going to add the ability to re-order phases and rules to suit your needs. Most importantly - What do you want to see?
  20. 11 points
    * * * * * The Citadel of the Starry Firmament is a magical building whose construction dates back to the Age of Myths, before the Free Peoples took refuge in Azyrheim, before Sigmar's first stormcast were forged. This citadel built in the dark lands of the Shadow Realm stretches toward the sky, like a vertiginous peak that rises above the mists. It is also called the Blinking Tower because it never stays in the same place for long. It frequently disappears and reappears at another site, usually miles away. It is somehow a nomadic building that migrates through the Coast of Fleeting Hopes. It goes without saying that its "movements" often startle travellers who pass nearby and many choose not to approach it (which is quite wise). Given its starry appearance and its magical nature, it is assumed that this tower was built long ago by a celestial archmage. But there is no concrete evidence to support this theory and so far there is no sign that the tower still belongs to anyone... As is often the case with enchanted buildings, rumours suggest there is a fabulous magical treasure hidden inside. Of course, many adventurers have tried to unravel this secret. Some have never been able to reach the tower because of its untimely teleportations, while others have managed to enter it. Most of those who came out simply found nothing interesting and left empty-handed, while the others have inexplicably lost their sanity in the tower... But despite these obstacles, people are still trying to discover the secret of this mysterious citadel. Among them, the Grand Master Astromancer of Port Stellis, Caius Lorentius, believes that the movements of the tower must correspond to constellations. He pays people in exchange of informations about the last movements of the citadel. But to date, his theory has not yet been proven and the mystery remains whole... * * * * *
  21. 10 points
    Hi guys! With all the stuff lately about the Free Cities, such as those from the Firestorm campaign box, or about making our own cities, I started to think about a setting for my Order armies. I must say that I really love the idea of several races (humans, aelf, duardins, etc.) coexisting in a same army under the banner of their Free City. So I cooked my own Free City: Port Stellis. What is Port Stellis? It is a harbour city located on the Coast of Fleeting Hopes, in one of the thirteen domains of Ulgu. The Coast of Fleeting Hopes is a very dark region: the night lasts half of the year while the day is bleak and gray during the other half. Port Stellis was originally an aelf corsair campment but it developped fast to become a fully fortified city thanks to human, duardin and aelf settlers. To this day, Port Stellis has become the home of nearly 100.000 people (humans, aelves, duardins and stormcast eternals) and the number is growing. The city and the surrounding region possess many special and uniques features which make it a strategic place for the Order alliance. What factions are there in Port Stellis? Here is a list of some of the main Order factions in Port Stellis at the present time (more may come when the city gets bigger): Collegiate Arcane Dispossessed Free Peoples Order Serpentis Scourge Privateers Stormcast Eternals The others Order Factions are not necessarily absent from Port Stellis, but they don't have enough people present in the city to be considered as "real factions". Now, let's see the special features of Port Stellis! The Star Ocean Gate and the Scourge Privateers "I've sailed thousands of miles, thousands of miles, chasing the stars...♪" — excerpt from a popular song among the aelf sailors The primary feature of Port Stellis is a huge Realmgate situated in the middle of the city bay. Its leads indirectly to the realm of Azyr. Since this gate is on the very surface of the water, a ship or a boat is required to pass through it. However crossing it is particularly dangerous because before you can arrive in Azyr, you need to sail through a mysterious interspace which separates the realms of shadows and heavens: the Star Ocean. The Star Ocean is a magnificent and breathtaking vision: a starry night sky, without any cloud or any light pollution, and a perfectly still ocean which reflects the sky just like a mirror. When a boat passes through the gate and enters the Star Ocean, it is exactly as if it were floating through the cosmos. It is all quiet and silent with scintillating stars everywhere and beautiful clouds of interstellar dust. However the Star Ocean is seemingly infinite and thus dangerous: if a captain goes astray or simply doesn't know how to follow the secret path hidden in the stars, then there is no way back home. The ship will get lost and wander forever... To this day, only the aelfs corsairs of the Coast of Fleeting Hopes know the path through the Star Ocean and to the realmgate at the other side. And even if they know the way, they still need the blessing of Sigmar to open the gate to Azyr. Note that those aelves worship Sigmar under the aspect of Silmaris, God of Cosmos, Lord of storms and Guardian of the Star Ocean. Since the corsairs are the only sailors who can travel from Port Stellis to Azyr and thus transport passengers and/or merchandises, they have a huge importance in the city and they are one of the most influential factions. Among them, Captain Naritha Blackbird is the most powerful of all: she commands nearly all the aelf corsairs of the Coast of Fleeting Hopes. The Scintillating Mines and the duardins miners "Brothers, sisters, never forget that Port Stellis is flourishing thanks to us and our hardwork!" — Barik De Bier Half a day's walk from Port Stellis are the Scintillating Mines. They are a network of underground galleries in which duardin miners extract precious gems called clariæ . It is an iridescent gemstone that emit a scintillating light, like a little star. Clariæ gems are Port Stellis's first export merchandise but there are also a lot of jewelers in the city who specialize themselves in carving those gems and craft beautiful jewels out of them. The wizards of the Astromancer Guild are also very interested by those gemstones and they are actively studying them since they believe they may have magical properties. The duardins of the Miners' Syndicate pride themselves on providing the city's primary source of wealth (the gemstones) and thus they have a lot of influence in Port Stellis. Although they wish they could do business without the aelf corsairs, they need them to export their gems in Azyr. The Miners' Syndicate is led by Barik De Bier, the richest duardin in town, who wears clariæ rings on each of his nine fingers. Rumors say that he became incredibly rich during his youth when he found a melon-sized gemstone while digging in the mine's deepest tunnels. The Stormkeep of the Stellar Champions "Sigmar's light shines eternal!" — motto of the Stellar Champions A garrison of Stormcast Eternals is present in Port Stellis. They are the Stellar Champions, one of Sigmar's stormhosts. Their most striking feature is their dark armors adorned with stars. Their leader is the noble Lord Aquilor Andras Silverblade. The Stellar Champions' mission is not only to protect Port Stellis and keept it clean from chaos corruption, but also to chart the region of the Coast of Fleeting Hopes and hunt the strange wild monsters who may become a threat should they get close to the city. Sometimes they are accompanied by the aelf corsairs who are always interested in hunting and capturing monsters. The Order Serpentis "I will take back what is mine and those barbarians will regret being born." — Sicath Somberheart A detachment of the Order Serpentis is posted in Port Stellis. The knights are led by Sicath Somberheart, an old white haired dreadlord who aspires to take back his lost fiefdom from the hands of Chaos barbarians. When the Age of Chaos came, he had no choice but to flee with his soldiers in Azyrheim because the enemies were too numerous. But after several centuries he will finally have his revenge... In fact his lands are only a week's walk from the Port Stellis. So far his soldiers have been training and defending the city along with the regular army, waiting for the day they will be fully ready. New drakespawn riders regularly come through the Star Ocean Gate to join Sicath's cause and pledge fealty to him. Sicath has the secret support of a few sorceresses of the Darkling Covens who are also waiting to take back their own lands in Ulgu. If Sicath is successful in his quest then they too will move in Ulgu and go to war with their chaotic enemies. The Astromancer Guild "The long dark night is coming. Sure it will be gloomy around here for half a year but this will also be ideal for studying the constellations!" — Caïus Lorentius Port Stellis is the home of the renowned Astromancer Guild. It is a college of wizards who seek to master the magic of heavens (although a minority of them choose to learn the magic of shadows instead). The Guild is led by the grand master Caius Lorentius, a very stern scholar who possesses his own Celestial Hurricanum. That's it for now. I will write more about the Coast of Fleeting Hopes and its strange inhabitants later. Here is a stormcast on which I tested a color scheme for my Stellar Champions Stormhost. When the real army will come, I will probably do a few minor tweaks in the color scheme (like painting the halo around the helm in a different color, perhaps silver) but the idea is there. The vanguard stormcast from the blightwar set will be painted like that. Meanwhile I ordered a gaming mat which will represent the typical terrain around Port Stellis and in the Coast of Fleeting Hopes: I can't wait for it to be delivered at my home!
  22. 10 points
    Endrinmaster is complete! This is my favourite model from the army so I'm pretty happy that he is finished and came out so well.
  23. 10 points
    Let's start with what they call a "money shot" I'm very pleased with how this turned out, it's crazy how well all three of these kits fit with some trimming. My original intention was to use the Steam tank & the doomwheel, but after looking at the kits, and the dimensions of the cannon port at the front, I decided to chuck in a warp lightning cannon kit for good measure. I started with the main chassis of the tank, putting it together as per the instructions, once I got it looking like a wheelbarrow, I then began to assemble the main body of the doomwheel. due to some inspiration hitting me at just the wrong moment, and me just going with it, this is the earliest image I have of that step. as you can see, I measured out and clipped enough of the central scaffold out to fit the counterweight from the Plagueclaw catapult\Warp lightning canon kit. the wheels themselves were assembled and then dry fitted (not glued) onto the central framework. the back flywheel was also removed. Next came the cannon itself, the steam tank has a little bit of a cradle system where the cannon slots in, so I cut down the barrel of the cannon, and the barrel of the warp lightning cannon, chopped the back end from the central part of the warp lightning cannon and slotted and glued it all together. Giving me something a little like this. Honestly, this was one of the more fiddly bits on this model. once dry, I attached it to the chassis. I continued to build up the sides of the steam tank, before undercoating the inside and the cannon black. I started to add various embellishments from various Skaven sprues to the main body of the tank. I created some green stuff cables and pipes using a Greenstuffworld greenstuff roller. and started to patch up and add detail to the wheel and attached powersource. The gun turret also had some modification, using the back end of the warp lightning gun I cut off earlier, the front end of a storm fiend's warpfire thrower. and a greenstuff pipe, I replaced the secondary gun, with a warpfire thrower. at some point I replaced the little lightning bolt at the front of the doomwheel with one of the bits of the middle framework I snipped out partially to make it look a little more attached to the main body, and partially to give it another point of contact to actually attach it to the main body The sides of the doomwheel had the blades removed, and more embellishments were added (including the two warp lightning projectors from the front of the doomwheel. before I undercoated the whole thing. After some thought, I decided that a heavy bronze, brass and warpstone scheme would suit it. so I got to work all of the warpstone was painted with a heavy edge highlight of green interference paint directly over the black, so it appears black until you turn it in the light, then as the light hits it shines green. I painted the centre part of the cannon in interference blue to give it a crackling electric appearance. I attempted a little bit of a verdigris effect on some of the brass and copper bits, dulled the whole thing down with a was of agrax eathshard. the chap on top was largely painted in the same metallics as the rest, his body was from one of the crew from the warp lightning cannon. his arms are from the stormvermin sprue, and his head was one of the pilot heads from the doomwheel kit. most of the wood on the model was basecoated in various browns and greens, given an agrax eathshade wash, then drybrushed with flayed one flesh. the studs were then picked out in copper and silver. The chap at the back was painted in the yellow of clan Skurvy. and now I need to find a base long enough for this thing. it can fit on a 120mm base if you don't mind the front and the back going over. the turret still comes off, the inside is still visible, the back of the cannon is the same colour as the rest of it. Start to finish, it took me around 5 days to complete. Let me know what you think, I believe the warscroll for the rat tank is still in the downloads.
  24. 10 points
    It finally happened. Last Thursday my Gates of Azyr finally opened and I popped my AOS cherry!. It's been a difficult year, if not for illness, deadlines , access to the car, kids extra curricular activities, weather, blah blah blah, I would have probably played earlier. So I drove to one of my local GW stores and played a very enjoyable game against a real person. After the game on the drive home I was surprised how good It felt. It didn't matter that my opponent had unpainted models, or that we didn't play a scenario. It was just great to play a game with my army. Ive spent 6 months painting my death army. Sounds like a long time, but I paint miniatures full time and surprisingly enough this leaves very little time to do anything for yourself. So enough ramble and nonsense, people want pics! I will be playing more games, one every month at least. So look forward to some shoddy phone pics soon. Here's currently what i've painted. Until next time, Happy Hobby Peeps! M
  25. 10 points
    Some of the work in progress pictures of my Great Unclean One which was about 99% finished for Warlords! So I started by building the majority of the model and the cut off the tentacle whip arm and positioned it on the rear of the model to be his new tail. I cut away a large amount of the top of the model and then filled the body with pieces of scrap cork so the repositioned spikes on top would have something to attach to. I then filled in the top of the model with some older less workable greenstuff. Made an arm out of greenstuff so I could place the newly created plasticard sword in position so I could get a feel for how the overall model would look. I then sculpted the top of the model and a new arm over the top of the placeholder arm in the previous image. I used loads of glass microbeads to add more details and make it more "nurgley". Once all the sculpted was done I sprayed the model black and then white from above to see where all the shading would go. I then airbrushed down the first base coats of green and some purple in thin layers around the sore areas. Followed by hours upon hours of painting the blisters in 3 layers and then going back and glossing them all. As you can see in the image above I went very yellow on them with a glaze, which I didn't like so went back and painted them all over again... The gloss parts were added on the base and are still drying in the pic below
  26. 9 points
    No realm rules\spells for this one. My list Their List: Skaven vs. Seraphon - Places of Arcane Power T1 I finished dropping first (for once as Skaven) and decide to take the first turn. First off, I didn't place my Gnawholes very well; the deployment for this battleplan is... odd for them and no spot seemed like a good spot. I start off with MMMWP on the Fiends and Skitterleap the AW to the left who gets off WLV which kills a grand total of 3 Skinks.. again, bad Gnawhole positioning, but at least I have the objective which, in the end, was likely better anyway. I run the Warpseer and Clanrats up to take middle while the right side Clanrats shimmy up towards the top right while Gnawhole teleporting the Fiends to the left to join the AW. The Windlaunchers only worthwhile target is the 3+ un-rendable Bastiladon which only ends up taking 4 damage after he saves all but 1 out of 6 hits. 2-0 Skaven His turn he teleports his Engine and 10 Skinks to the top right objective, but I expected this and never intended to take that objective throughout the game anyway. Everything else shuffles away from the WLV he brings down the Rippers into my AW (who I forgot to screen from behind with 2-3 of the Fiends) and Fiends. He ends up taking 3 wounds off the Warpseer with the Laser Turtle with shooting but not much else... combat is a bit different though. He takes 3 off the AW thanks to his ridiculous 3+ save and -1 to hit while the rest of the Rippers kill 1 1/2 Stormfiends and they do 14 damage to kill all but 1, which he pulls as the Shock Gauntlets or AW would've likely finished it off. T2 He wins priority, fails cogs and moves the Slann and Astrolith to the top right with the Engine and Skinks. In shooting, he takes the Warpseer down to 4 wounds left and I get pissed off at myself as I forgot to re-roll my failed saves for both turns, ah well. He ends up charging the left side Skinks into the Fiends and wary fighters them away as a roadblock. I decide to dispel WLV and try to Skitterleap and re-cast on the top right group with the Grey Seer's 3d6, but unfortunately the only thing that manages to go off this turn is MMMWP. I move everything up a bit while moving the Clanrats on the left away to make room for the Fiends to get through. They then proceed to (surprise) murder the 10 Skinks doing 26 damage on my first batch of 13 rolls; warpsparked fiends are absolutely nuts. The Windlaunchers shoot at the Fortressadon again and do another 7 damage to finish it off. 6-1 Skaven T3 He wins priority again and kills 14 Clanrats out of the 40 unit with Stellar Tempest. For summoning, he brings the Murder Turtle back and the Engine manages to get 3 Rippers in as well. The Razordons kill the Grey Seer who fails just enough saves and the Laserdon fails to get anything through on the Warpseer.. but hey, the Skinks somehow manage to get 1 through. He also managed to get some Skinks in range as another roadblock to my Fiends. I (again) only manage to get off MMMWP and.. well, instead of just pulling the models, we wanted to see the damage potential, so I roll the full amount of Ratling Cannon rolls and end up doing a total of 46 damage to the 10 Skinks after saves. Knowing I wouldn't be able to kill the Shiney-Turtle again, the Windlaunchers go into the Razordons, roll horrifically and just do 7 wounds. We end up calling it there as he cannot mathematically win at this point. 12-3 Skaven Major Victory Overall Thoughts So yeah, I love the Stormfiends, but I really don't think was a great showcase of them. They spent the entire time in the bottom-left side of the board with nothing to really shoot at. However, I knew that putting my AW on that left objective to capture it (which I absolutely needed to do T1) would mean he would put his Rippers on him, and I decided to have the Fiends tank them instead of 20 Clanrats. Now, I just assumed the Fiends wouldn't kill the Rippers in retaliation so I wanted them there to guard the AW against a double-turn, which he ended up getting. Had I put the Fiends more central, they likely would have easily murdered the heroes in the top-right with the Launchers and the Ratlings could've potentially taken on the Bastiladon. So, yeah, I like them. Is 9 too many? Probably, but I'll tell you what.. that's a lot of wounds to chew through and the damage output is nuts and makes my Jezzails and Acolytes combo look silly when you compare it to the amount of resilience vs. firepower you get from these guys. Even after Vigordust + MMMWP damage, I still had 7 models left with 1 on 1-3 wounds remaining (can't recall off the top of my head now). One thing I wasn't impressed with was the WLV; I've never had it do so little, but at the same time that was all on me and my Grey Seer failing to Skitterleap to the top-right to potentially get it off again. Looking back, I honestly think I should've just thrown it down top right T1 to discourage him from even trying to take that objective as it would've likely forced him to go more central and into range of my Fiends (also at the risk of taking that middle objective). Anyway, I think I may run with this for awhile, but I'm also keen to try 6 Fiends + 6 Jezzails as a combination and of course 6 Fiends + 40 Monks once I get them built and painted. As always, thanks for reading and appreciate any feedback in the main Skaventide thread so we can keep the conversation more out there.
  27. 9 points
    Welcome to the first entry for my Free Peoples blog. I have been working on this army since 2015. It's been a passion project of mine since first seeing the Empire army in the 8th Edition army book. I had always wanted to start an Empire army but never though I had the painting skills to do them justice. In 2015 my best friend James was painting up his Bretonnian army. We reconnected (we had deployed together in the military and became good friends) after a couple of years and we got talking about Warhammer again. I had picked up the 8th Edition Empire book whilst we were deployed. I read the whole thing front to back, immersing myself in the awesome lore. After speaking to James I picked up the Empire Battalion Box and started my journey. Unfortunately I was deployed again in mid 2015 to early 2016, missing out of the transition to Age of Sigmar. When I came back the Empire was still alive in the form of the warscrolls and was not yet referred to as the Free Peoples faction (except in the keywords on the Empire Warscrolls). I spent most of this time hobbying, including re-basing the few miniatures I had completed prior to deploying (a single unit of twenty Averland halberdiers). Over the next 3 years I built up my army to what it is today. I vowed not to play the army at an event until I had 2000 points of playable Free Peoples painted. Below is the photos of my army at Cancon 2019, the first time I had taken the fully painted army to an event. The point of this blog will be to keep track of my hobby and gaming progress with this army that I love so much. Thanks for reading and I hope you enjoy the content.
  28. 9 points
    Finished 40 ghouls- another 60 to go! Simple base coat/wash/drybrush for these guys so i can concentrate on the basing for the bigger models. Quick job on the charnel throne too- airbrush basecoat and shading then wash/drybrush. Trying some skin shading on the second Arch Regent and it looks ok...sorta.
  29. 9 points
    Finished the Ghorgon just under the wire. This brings me to 950 points so I'm calling the first 1k complete. I'll either keep it there for the command point or add geminids. I think I'm going to take a break from building the army for a bit to work on other armies. I'll keep posting battle reports here as I learn to actually play this army.
  30. 9 points
    Hello guys, I have finally finished my Runefather. This was a real interesting thing to paint, and I admit I cut a few corners to get it done but I'm still super happy with the end result. The base I think came out particularly well. The icicles are made of melted flying stands, trimmed and hit with a gloss varnish. Finally, here is the entire painted army as it currently stands! Hope you enjoy:
  31. 9 points
    I'm one of the few that kept the stormcast from the soul wars box and sold the nighthaunt. I've decided to go with Anvils of the Heldenhammer as I like the black and gold and I tested out the colour schemes on some easy-to-build liberators. Here's the first finished model- the force will be entirely Sacrosanct chamber!
  32. 9 points
    Halflings are back again!! This time the hobbit forces attended a doubles tournament in Ohio hosted by "Rend 4, Age of Sigmar War Gaming" club! An unlikely alliance was formed between the forces of the Moot and the bloody pillagers of Khorne. Here's a bit of fluff on that! Since I didn't attend a tourney for a while, I wanted to make this one special and make my first display board, and boy did it pay off! Event itself consisted of 16 teams and 32 players battling it off to see who was superior! Each player brought a 1000 point list, so in the end it was a 2000 point battle. There were three games, with each lasting three hours, which was more than plenty of time. Me and my teammate brought middle of the road lists and were just hoping to stay on mid tables, and man were we wrong. . Our first game was against double Slaves to Darkness list with lots of chaos knights, and Total Conquest scenario. The guys, Josh and Nick, were newer players, but knew their rules very well, and were great fun to play against! They decided to give us the first turn, and that was their biggest fault as both my teamamate and I got lucky on our run rolls and grabed the side objectives early on. From then on we just had to weather the knights' charge and stay put, as we had a large advantage in numbers! We got 30/30 points this game, scoring both our secondary objectives as well! Going into game two, we were slighlty fired up since we unexpectadly did so well our first game! This time, our opponents, Rob and Matt, combined the forces of Nurgle and Daughers of Khaine (They also might have had one of the best team names "Dirty Girls"). The scenario was Starstrike. The first objective fell right into the middle of the table and large unit of bloodletters quickly snatched it away. However what the game came down to was where the other two objectives were going to fall, and they dropped exactly where we wanted them to, which won us the game. However, by the end of the game there was only one brave halfling left on the table. This game we also scored 30/30 possibe points! Pressure was one! Doing way better than we thought we would, our last game was against the "Defending Champs", Michael and Roger, who also scored 60/60 possible points so far. While we were excited to be on table 1, we also knew that now we were playing against top players. Our opponents brough a Stormcast and a Fyreslayers alliance list (+ flamesphyre pheonix). The scenario was Scorched Earth, and quite honestly we got pretty schooled this game. Our opponents outplayed us every turn, and we lost a crucial priority roll in the middle of the game. I also did not use my griffon as effectively as I could've, which Roger pointed out in the end of the game. Overall, we got crushed, but managed to score 5 points (due to the kindness of our opponents). This game was defientely a learning experience and showed us that there is much room for growth! In the end of the tournament we finished 5th out of 16 teams. Not too bad considering we were hoping for mid-tables! What was the most exciting though is that we got both "Best Combined Alliance" and "Best Chaos Alliance"! On the side note, there was also a pianting competition and my halfling ranger ended up taking home "Best Painted Single Model" award! At the end of the day, this was an absolutely amazing event, with a great TO and community which loves their hobby! There is also talk of even bigger GT-type event in the future, which is very exciting! ****Here's a link to the "Rend 4, Age of Sigmar Wargaming Club". You guys should definetely check them out! It's a very active Age of Sigmar group in Ohio, with some amazing people running it!*** https://www.facebook.com/groups/Rend4/?fref=gs&dti=274472279563016&hc_location=group_dialog That's it this time! Hope you like what I've got, Until next time!
  33. 9 points
    "The proud flag ship "karaz dahendra" of Elgi-bar's skyfleet takes to the skies! Crewed by the different uniformed arkanauts of the Rereksfjiord company, it is currently under the daredevil captain Agrün Svinvirrsson whom is eager to prove himself as the most cunning sky vessel operator. This ambition comes from his first muster press, where rival arkanauts from barak-zilfin boasted that no other sky port could never produce a captain better than thiers." This is the biggest model I've ever assembled and painted. It has been both a frustrating and rewarding experience, which only spurs me onward to expand my sky fleet.
  34. 9 points
    When I first heard about Age of Sigmar, I was skeptical. It had been some 15 years since I last played a Games Workshop game (circa 3rd edition 40k) and while I never had much of an attachment to the Warhammer Fantasy world, the fact it was just destroyed and replaced with something else was a little weird. After I gave it more thought and saw how streamlined (NOTE: This is not the same thing as "dumbed down" which is a common anti-AOS retort I've seen) it was, and the fact there were no points, I had a revelation: Finally, there was the style of game that I had long since wanted, being able to buy a force, and add things to it as you went along and just use them next game, without fiddling around with points to fit them in. The idea that I could decide after a game, you know I really want to add a unit of Retributors, and then just buy them and assemble them and next game just set them down with my force, was great. I had long lamented the concept that you needed an X point list to start playing, it's discouraging to new players who need to spend a large amount of money just to get started and to those starting new armies because you can't start small when everyone is playing 2,000 point games; my experience has been that if you aren't playing the same points everyone else is it's very hard to get a game in because people would rather play at their preferred points level than bring the points down to entertain a new/expanding player. In fact this very thing stopped me from getting back to Warhammer several years prior, because I didn't want to immediately start playing at 2,000 points or whatever the preferred points was just to start getting a game, and the impression I got was that people did not prefer to want to play at lower points. As I read reviews, I saw more and more people slam the game for the "lack of balance", seemingly ignoring the fact that you were supposed to A) Not be a ****** and try to game the system and B) Have a chat with your opponent to decide what made sense. Still, I saw lots of posts laughing about how one could do something stupid like field 10 Nagashes or 16 cannons or other unrealistic things that never would happen, forgetting again that if someone tried that, they would likely not even get a full game as anyone setting up against it would call them out, likely not play, and worse that person would then get a reputation as "that guy" to be avoided since they try to game the system. When The General's Handbook was announced, and the world rejoiced. Points, finally! The game is "complete" now. It will be balanced. And I felt a lump in my throat, because I knew what that meant: That any other way to play is now dead and buried. Points, once introduced to the game, will consume any other style and become the default way of playing. Communicating with your opponent goes out the window, because you no longer need to; the points are the only communication you need. When The General's Handbook finally came out, and not everything had points, that fear grew larger, because it meant anything without points might as well not exist. And that proved to be true: Those nice battalions in the Start Collecting boxes, or the larger boxed armies, or the new (Christmas 2016) battleforces? They don't exist, because they have no points. Grombrindal, the legendary White Dwarf himself, has zero reason to be bought by most players because he has no points, so you can't use him, and GW has stated that not everything is intended for all three playstyles, which as a result means they won't be used at all. As I feared, Matched Play quickly subsumed everything else to become the only way to play Age of Sigmar. The General's Handbook might as well have started on page 98 (that's the section where Matched Play begins). My problem with this is twofold: First, Matched Play is one of the styles to play, not the only style. It's clearly intended for tournament type events where you need something to balance and can't reasonably chat with your opponent. Yet here we are, I would wager, where the vast majority of games have boiled down to two questions: How many points? Which of the six Pitched Battle scenarios will we use? Everything else may as well not even be there because god forbid a scenario require deployment other than the standard. All those interesting Battleplans from the various campaign books and Battletomes might as well not exist anymore, because they aren't roughly even Pitched Battles with roughly even Matched Play army construction. The game goes from being wildly varied to droll and boring, with most of the options gutted because nobody wants to take the time and effort to be responsible hobbyists. But wait, you say. We need points. Otherwise nothing will stop someone from fielding nothing but the most powerful units. Except yes, things will. Someone who does that is going to face the same problem that someone doing the hypothetical "ten Nagash" list is going to face, that is they will be labeled a ******, refused a game and then get a bad reputation around the group until either they are forced out or learn to play nicely. Warhammer, perhaps more than any other wargame, is a social game. There is an implied agreement to not game the rules. There is an implied agreement to not try to out cheese one another. A little communication goes a long way, and could still go a long way. There is no reason other than not wanting to bother with talking anyone beyond asking points that Matched Play is now, for many people, the only way to play. Perhaps the biggest issue with Matched Play is what it implies. You see, before Matched Play , the onus was on the player. If you saw someone who tried to game the system by taking only the best units, or infinite summoning, or the hypthetical ten Nagashes, or any other boogeyman situation, you knew they were a ****** who had zero regard for their opponents and only cared about themselves. With points though, you can still in many cases field very powerful units, even game the system in other ways, because the points aren't balanced across the board (look at any hypothetical power list), except now the player can pretend they aren't really a ******, that they're playing by the rules so there's nothing wrong or that the rules are to blam. Communication, responsibility and accountability take a backseat because there's a fallback that absolves the player from any of those things. Note I'm not at all saying Matched Play is bad. I'm saying that Matched Play being the default way to play is bad, not because of what it is but because it cuts out a large swathe of the game, for fear of hypothetical situations that never actually happened and likely will never happen except with the rudest of players who literally don't care about anything other than saying they won a game, and it's just as likely those players wouldn't play Warhammer because of all its flaws as a competitive game. Matched Play is perfectly fine, dare i say it necessary, for tournaments, and I'm glad it exists. I just dislike that Matched Play has become, for many of us, the only way to play Age of Sigmar and anything that isn't Matched Play no longer has a place in the game. In short, I feel that Matched Play should remain an option for Age of Sigmar, not the option. There is IMHO more fun to be had by using Open Play and actually communicating and not being a ****** than there is just throwing down with a 2,000 point list and pretending that it's somehow balanced because it has 3+ Battleline units, 0-6 Leaders, 0-4 Behemoths and 0-4 Artillery. Plus, this puts the onus back on the player to play responsibly. And as a result the game will be better off. Keep Matched Play where it belongs: The domain of tournaments and structured leagues. For everything else, show some responsibility towards an enjoyable game.
  35. 9 points
    “In the dark fetid corners of Ghur you will find the Wyssan Wood. Dwelling amongst its primeval depths reside the Venomtongue Spiderfang grot tribes. These feather-bedecked grots have mastered all manner of webbed horrors: the stealthy, bone-armored Spinebacks, the lightning-fast striped Wolfhunters, and the bulbous Purple Skullbacks. Swarms of mottled spiderlings are prodded ahead of the creeping horde and mountainous Arachnaroks bring up the rear. But the horrors do not end there, for supporting their hordes are rickety weapons of war crafted from moss-covered stones, rotten boughs, and sticky webbing of the children of the Feaster from Beyond. Our scouts suggest that even greater horrors have yet to pour forth from the tangled depths of the Wyssan Wood! Woe be to the realms if the Venomtongue tribes of the Wyssan Wood ever unite with Spittlegit or even, blessed Azyr, the Ironjawz hordes of Gordrakk! May Sigmar never let it be!“ -Lord Castellant Rhemus of the Astral Templars This is an introduction to my Spiderfang Grot forces. I started these a couple years ago during 8th edition (hence the bases) and plan to take them back up again once the Spiderfang release drops (we know it is coming GW; just make it happen next week...please). I have tons of unpainted models but I'm only posting what I currently have done. A bit of background: Ever since coming upon the Arachnarok kit a couple years ago, I’ve fallen in love with the forest grot aesthetic. While initally saddened to find only 3 Spiderfang kits available, I realized that this was the perfect opportunity to build this force, using conversions, from the ground up. Back in 8th, it was a generic O&G force, and I used a bunch of models as counts-as to be able to field an effective army of all forest goblins. Currently, my completed models from this force are as follows: Arachnarok with a Shaman and a Catchweb Spidershrine Grot Chukka 10 Spineback Spider Riders (were my Deff Creepers in 8th) Doom Diver Lobba Rogue Idol of Gork (or Mork) 40+ Savage Grot Berserkers with Big Stabba (Counted as Savage Orks) 40+ Spider Swarm with Spider Herders (Counted as a Squig Herd with Handlers) Savage Grot Shaman A lot of this is harder to use with new synergies in AoS but I look forward to GW expanding their forces so I can return to this army. Enjoy the photos and I look forward to your feedback!
  36. 9 points
    Hi everyone, To go along side my shiny new Stormcast force I wanted some of the new Age of Sigmar scenery for them to fight over. I have always liked making and painting scenery, it real quick to do and can look great with very little effort put in. Before I started I needed to have an idea of where this terrain was going to be set, the Realms of Life and Beasts where the front runners and I didn't decide 100% until I got in to the painting. Life won out as I liked the greenery I could add in to it all. The more games of Age of Sigmar I played the more I like the freedom of terrain that it allows over Warhammer where you had to allow for ranked up units, you can also get away with 'scatter' terrain that is just to make the place look cool ? There was a bit of kit bashing going on with most of my stuff, the new Age of Sigmar terrain kits are very interchangeable with each other and look great with a simple drybush and wash. The brown and gray are painted exactly the same as the bases on my Stormcast (so they look like they are really fighting there) but with a little more foliage added. The spare levels from the tree kit are a cool bit of color and really help hide any gaps. Enough rambles from me here are the photos.
  37. 8 points
    I wanted to make my Katakros pretty colourful, probably as a reaction against all the dark and monotonous styles other players seemed to be going for. His base still needs work- but the individual miniatures are now finished. Now on to the rest of the army
  38. 8 points
    "The Sterntower Marksmen are a newly formed regiment out of Steingart. They are garrisoned as part of the line of sentry post and signal towers that guard the low foothills of the eastern Wissenland, under the shadow of the imposing Black Mountains. Always at the ready to launch their signal flares to signify invasions, the watchtowers are essential for border defence. The Marksmen share the Sterntower with several other Imperial regiments - Halberdiers and Spearmen - with whom they have established a front-line camaraderie. Sergeant-at-Arms Hans Schwarzblut is the tower officer, in command of the Sterntower Marksmen and a unit each of Halberdier and Spearmen. He is a veteran of many battles against marauding Orcs and his tight discipline keeps all the troops at high alert. Unwilling to sit and wait, Schwartzblut often orders patrols up into the narrow mountain passes." - Uniforms and Heraldry of the Empire Crossbowmen are one of the strongest units in the Free Peoples arsenal, providing robust mid-range shooting and a nasty surprise for enemies who recklessly charge them or the Great Company they are in. On paper they don't look that fearsome. A 20" range, 4+ to hit and 4+ to wound isn't that great. 1 wound each, low bravery, low movement and a terrible save. Where they shine is in the synergies with their in-built abilities and the rest of the army. Positives Pipers - Stand and Shoot 2.0! If an enemy ends it's charge within 3" of the Crossbowmen they can open up and shoot with their Crossbows at the charging unit. You lose the Reload Fire (below) ability when you stand and shoot (enemy will be within 3"). But what is truly amazing is that if another ranged Free Guild unit is charged you can support them without being in the same Great Company as the rule reads "Once per turn, if an enemy unit ends it's charge move within 3" of a unit that includes any Pipers, they can signal their unit to stand and shoot; each model can then shoot it's Crossbow at the charging unit". Standard Bearer - Whilst their save and Bravery is bad, the Standard Bearer allows rolls of 1 to be an automatic pass for the unit in Bravery checks. This is important as it stacks with the Order Battle Trait Defiant Avengers (allowing you to re-roll battleshock tests) and the Freeguild General on Horses banner (roll two dice for Freeguild units with 24" of the Freeguild General). In brief, ALWAYS keep these guys within range of the Freeguild General with Banner. Abilities Piercing Bolts - Each time a you roll a wound roll of 6 or more for a Crossbow, that attack is resolved with a Rnd of -1 instead of (-). Why is it good? Give your Crossbowmen Hold the Line! (1+ to hit and wound) and that means -1 rend on 5's and 6's. With 60 shots from the Reload Fire ability (below), that can get scary. Reload Fire - Freeguild Crossbowmen can shoot twice if their unit has 20 or more models and there are no enemy models with 3". Why is this good? You can move and still punch out 60 shots (as long as no enemies are within 3"), this means you can support your Swordsmen on the move without any negative effects (unlike the Handgunners). You can also do 60 shots with the Great Company support (again no enemies within 3") in the enemy charge phase even if the enemy hasn't charged (because the enemy just has to be within 3" of the unit being supported). Negatives 6+ save Bravery 5 5" move Get picked off easily by long range units (looking at you SC Vanguard). Recommendations Keep them 3.5" from the front line of your Freeguild Guard (so as to not jeopardise the Great Company support and your 60 shots). Keep them within range of the Freeguild General (for the banner and Idomitable (Command Trait)). Keep themwithin range of the Luminarks 10", 6+ ward save (if you have one). Use Hold the Line! (+1 to hit, +1 wound) from the Freeguild General to give them 3+, 3+ (though they can't move) Make them insane by getting two command points, giving them Hold the Line! and Rousing Battlecry command abilities (+1 hit) from the General on Horse and General on Griffon and then have an Azyros in range of their target (within 10" targetting unit get's re-roll 1's). Bathe in the sheer ****** of 2+ to hit (re-rolling 1's) and 3+ to wound on 60 shots. Use them to support your Freeguild Guard. These are your damage dealers, they are essentially ranged Greatswords.
  39. 8 points
    As far as I know no Bretonnian miniatures were released during 4th edition (1992-1996). Many 3rd edition models, but not all, are found in the 1991 Citadel Catalogue (also called Red Catalogue). There are also many 2nd edition models shown in this catalogue so it is intended not to show them together with 3rd edition models here. I found many models that are not shown or named in any publication (catalogue, White Dwarf). So I can't be completely sure if there are more unlisted models. It would be very much appreciated to get information on that. All 3rd edition models were made from metal, but all horses were made from plastic. Miniatures before 1989 were in smaller scale (25 mm). Bretonnian King and Bretonnian General (1989) Bretonnian Knight Heroes (4 different models, 1990 or 1991) Bretonnian Wizards (1989) The left one was released as an Imperial Wizard, but was used by GW as a Bretonnian wizard in their studio army.) Chevalier d'Honneur and Chevalier de Notre Dame de Bataille (1989) Knight from the King's Retinue and Chevalier Rampant (1989) Bretonnian Knights with Handweapon (10 different models, 1990) Bretonnian Knights with Lance (10 different models, 1990) Bretonnian Foot Knights (21 different models, 1990/91) Mounted Men-At-Arms (8 different models, probably 1991) Mounted Men-At-Arms with Bows (3 different models, probably 1991) Retainers and Men-At-Arms (16 different models, 1990/91) Archers (10 different models, 1990) Crossbowmen (3 different models, 1990/91) Crossbowmen (3 different models, 1990/91 and 1987). The right one was released in the "F4 Men-At-Arms" series in White Dwarf 96 from December 1987. This month there was also the release of the 3rd edition of Warhammer and the model was labeled as Bretonnian later in the "Red Catalogue". Crossbowmen (6 different models, 1988) Brigands (10 different models, 1990/91) Breech Loading Bombard (1990/91) Mortar (1990/91) Organ Gun (4-barreled, 1990) Organ Gun (7-barreled, 1990) Pot-de-Feu (1990) Ballista (1990) Swivel Gun (1990) Mantlet (1990/91)
  40. 8 points
    Just a quick update today: I finished my Alarielle-based Slaaneshi Daemon princess conversion, and now just need to paint it. It'll be cool to have another similar scale Daemon princess alongside Sylle'Esske to lead my Hedonites (and now I'm going to have to find a different name for my mortals since GW used mine lol).
  41. 8 points
    So today I finally put together a fun little mortis engine / coven throne / blood palanquin for my death army in the theme of the wraith fleet! Pretty happy with how it came out and is a nice extra step in my little conversion project. Hopefully will get more stuff done and painted soon
  42. 8 points
    With the Legions Of Nagash and Malign Portents I have finally found the motivation to finish the Shyish themed table I started awhile back. I collected a bunch of terrain for my Shyish board, assembled it but never got around to painting it. My hope is to really get on it. Here are my first two pieces, a set of the Hobbit Ruins and a Shyish themed Realmgate.
  43. 8 points
    After my bout with real life disease I have actually finished the whole of the Nurgle half of the Blightwar during my recovery. I managed Horticulux, the ten Plaguebearers, three Nurglings and three Plague Drones, and I have managed to throw in a Feculent Gnarlmaw as well just for fun. I'm going to take them down to the Rotherham GW store tomorrow for the Malign Portents painting competition. As part of my #365challenge I was wondering how close I have been getting to having at least one of each Maggotkin Unit. I'm well on the way to achieving this, although my issue will be finding the funds for two Great Unclean Ones and also getting two more of the Maggot Lords. Here are the Plague Drones in their finished state: So I took these down to the Games Workshop in Rotherham today for the first month of the Malign Portents painting competition. I was impressed with the quality of the other entries. Having been down for Armies on Parade and other events I haven't been blown away by the standard, but this seemed to be a little better. There was a very nice Moonclan Grot force, some good looking Khorne and Ironjawz forces. Month 2 is a Harbinger so I'd better pick up the Darkoath Warqueen!
  44. 8 points
    Its been a while but I have 2 new finished units to add. 6 Skyfires and a Shaman
  45. 8 points
    Alright, I guess it's time to finally update this Blog. Truly has been quite some time. From now on I'll try to Update this at least biweekly, so those of you interested may enjoy yourselves some hobbits. This time, 10 freshly painted greatswords and a Halfling General with decapitated moonclan grot's head at his feet! Hope you like what I've got, Wubba lubba dub dub, Until next time!
  46. 8 points
    Hi all! I've been hard at work on the army, but my focus is a bit off so I'm going to do some updating and sharing. I played a game with Paul Conti last night, who quickly turned around and made a YouTube Batrep out of it. So I came home last night, and started getting some finishing work done on the Endrinriggers. I'm going to put a bit of freehand nose art on them all, then glue them so they'll stay for good
  47. 8 points
    My Beasts of Chaos army once was comprised of Beast Herds, Shaggoths and Chaos Ogres... but when the 7th Edition army book came out it removed those units from the army and so project warpig was started. I had a bunch of spare boar heads in my bits box at the time as the tuskgor chariots always came with alternate heads. These pigs needed a leader and aside from the shield, i also built my first full greenstuff model for the doompig. Unfortunately i never ran them much so never finished them off fully. With Age of Sigmar, i've ran them a few times and with devastating effect if they get into enemy lines. In honour of some of their most recent successes i've started to scratch build a piggy-mum (will count as a Ghorgon) to fill out the brood. Pig-gors Doompig Ghor-pig Size Comparisons Next hobby tasks for these: So i'm rebasing all of these to rounds, i'm going to do some more conversion work on piggsy (the pig on the square base) to turn him into another standard bearer. I need to finish basing and painting the DoomPig and obviously there is still a lot of modelling to go to finish the mother pig off. Her arms are going to have large bladed weapons bound on, i need to add a cloak to her too, buckles and detailing to the straps, additional armour plates and then i'll see what else needs adding after that.
  48. 8 points
  49. 8 points
    I figured I would show off some of @Holy Hammer Hern's beautiful tables from Holy Havok. Check out these beauties! Table 1: Aelf, Shrine of the Phoenix I didn't have the opportunity to play on this board but it is my understanding that wizards who occupied the tower could measure from either of the beacons to determine range to their target. Table 2: Aelf, Temple of Khaine This was another table I didn't have the opportunity to play on. The two temples/shrines on this board each had their own effects but I don't know the details for sure. Table 3: Human, the Collegiate Arcane We played our game 4 on this board and it was quite the board. The central terrain piece was the terrain objective which each team needed more models around to claim. Its central position along with its proximity to the starting line made our round truly dependent on who brought more models to hug this terrain feature's base. Luckily we had numbers in our favor and the length of the double tower made for some excellent choke points towards the far ends. The fences also offered a surprising bulwark that stopped a Juggy lord from charging in on the Glottkin. I was surprised at how tactical some of these simple terrain features factored in to play. It was great! Here is the shot of our Game 4 before we obliterated their back line: Table 4: Ogors, the Challenge Stone We played game 5 on this table and, despite the board favoring our destruction opponents, it was quite fun. The big center stone granted battleshock immunity (?) to the forces of Destruction, which was painful again Odors, but it also granted +1 to hit and +1 to wound to all units within 6", something my 5 Blight Kings were quite thankful for (and the 36 wounds those five models generated from exploding 5+ attacks... ). The simple symmetry of the board was broken up for our match with a 8" radius prison that held one of each of our units but that out units couldn't travel through. The tent with Ogors amongst the signal fires was our terrain objective which had some interesting tactical movement for the larger models in the area (since you couldn't stand on or move the many impassable elements in this area. Our game 5, right before their Irongut deathstar did more wounds to my models than had been suffered in the entire tourney up until that point... Table 5: Orruks and Grotts, the Nest of the Arachnarok We actually didn't get to play this board during the event, but we played against @Hooves of Doom and his lovely wife's Nagash, all the Mortarchs, and 2 Mournghoul force. It was quite the game for sure! The table itself had a pretty scary mechanic where, during every movement phase, the arachnarok would spit at all units within 3d6 inches of his terrain piece. On a 4+, those units took 1d3 mortal wounds. Couple this with all the shrooms and their forests were either befuddling Mystic terrain or projected a 6" bubble of that effect, it shouldn't be surprising that it slowed down the game quite a bit (Arachnarok spitting at 3-8 units twice per round and a bunch of befuddlement), but we had all the time in the world for the practice game, so it was no bother for us. The terrain objective on this board was the big Orkky shrine in the back. It was a great game all in all. Here is a shot of the pre-tourney warmup game with @Hooves of Doom: Table 6: Nurgle, the Wyrmid Reaches We didn't have a chance to play on this table which made my Nurgle heart quite sad. It is my understanding the the wyrms in the center were the terrain objective (thus requiring teams to be close) but they did 1d3 unpreventable mortal wounds to nearby units. The copious streams were deadly terrain as well, which would have likely caused folks to think twice about runs and charges on this board. Table 7: Seraphon, the Shrine of Sotek This table was where we had our game 1 and it was quite the challenge for our force which was comprised of many large monsters. Despite the obvious mobility concerns, we had a lot of fun navigating our huge chaos host through this dense jungle. The small forest in the foreground with a triceratops skeleton was the impassable terrain objective and it made it quite difficult to move past this small space towards the enemy's starter zone (which was itself the main objective of the scenario). The Shrine of Sotek had a gambling mechanic that on a 1-5 punished you for attempting to activate it but on a 6 actually healed wounds or even brought back dead models from your force. I heard a great uproar on the first day from this table as a dead Lord Kroak called upon Sotek and was restored back into play, much to the chagrin of his enemies. This board was one of the more tactically challenging forces given the model footprint of our force, but it was still a fun challenge to face. Here is a shot from game 1 with @Fenske and his partner: Table 8: Shyish, the Sands of Time This delightful Tomb Kings throwback table was where we had our second match. The ruins in the foreground were the terrain objective and the huge animated sand pit had a chance of teleporting units to any board edge, which would have been helpful against many forces would deployed without fully understanding what it was. This was doubly true for our match, where one of the main objectives was to get warpstone shards off the other side of the table. Unfortunately for our opponents, the open deployment zone worked perfectly for a huge 30 strong chaos warrior conga line to hold the line against any such chicanery and our own Verminlord Deceiver (and his skitter leap) made short work of this objective. Here is a shot of our game on this fantastic TK board: Table 9: Skaven, the Rats in Hats This board was another one we didn't have the opportunity to play on. I believe the sinking bellower was the objective and the mucky swamps were deadly terrain that might have been doing mortal wounds to those in it as well. It's a real shame we didn't get to play on this board given how beautiful it is. Maybe next time! Table 10: Tzeentch, the Twisting Realm Ironically, this was the board of our ultimate match up, which occurred in game 3, where were faced off against an army that was almost a mirror of our own force and whose generals we actually tied for Best Overall with (although they took home the title after three different tiers of considerations had to be made between our two forces to break the tie). That said, even though we only scored 1-1 against each other (with a maximum total of 4 points), it was a legendary game where our Archaon of the Faceless of Tzeentch squared off against and slew his dark mirror in Tzeentch's own realm. The high was short lived as their Skarbrand came barreling in, killing our Archaon, our Warlord, and another hero has he rushed his way through. The blue pillars had a chance to wound units nearby while the pink ones healed units. The floating blackhole in the distance did mortal wounds to those traveling underneath it, as did the foregrounded eye of Tzeentch (3" radius from the terrain), which itself was the terrain objective. We'll be talking about Holy Havok on Warhammer Weekly tomorrow. You can check it out live at my cohost @Vincent Venturella's Youtube channel tomorrow at 9:00 PM EST, or you can look for the link to the show as an update to the blog as well. I'm hoping to do some battle reports of these games in the coming weeks. Hope you got a glimpse of all the Havok-y goodness from these images. Happy gaming!
  50. 8 points
    After Blood and Glory last weekend I came home pumped up for some new and exciting Hobby challenges. The first thing I decided to do was create my very own Oak of Ages to be the centrepiece of a new set of Sylvaneth terrain. I've purchased a Grassy Plains 2 FAT mat and I realised I didn't have any 'green' terrain to go with it. So I started raiding the terrain bin.... A while ago I'd bought a big piece of Aquarium terrain to make a realm gate with, and I knew that my son had collected some twigs and sticks recently that were drying on the porch outside the house. With these as a basis I started gluing things together. I had an old 6" base from my free wood elf wood from 8th edition which was the perfect size for a base so I mitre bonded the tree stump down. I then Dremmelled some bits off half a realm gate to make it roughly fit the gap that was in the wooden piece. I added some random playbark to hide some of the gaps and then started applying cheap air dry clay to add texture. To make it look like bark I used a piece of playbark to texture it and push it into the gaps. This was much faster than using a sculpting tool. When the clay was dry I went over it all with watered down PVA as the clay doesn't always stick as well as you would like. The next job was to stick on some big sticks to the stump to start making the canopy. I just mitre bonded them in place, trying to find places that had gaps and grooves tap they fitted in to. Once these dried I used a pack of Woodland scenics tree armatures to make all the smaller branches. I just went round the tree drilling small holes in and pushing in the tree armatures. Once dry these need twisting and shaping. Even after this they don't look too realistic at this point, but hopefully foliage will help cover this up... I then attacked the whole thing with spray cans. I just sprayed it in bursts with all sorts of browns, greys and whites and then dry brushed areas. I'm going to come back to add more detail later so I wasn't too worried about how this all looked. I just wanted it all blended together and all the air clay covered up. The only thing I tried to do was make sure that the realm gate part was lighter than the rest of the tree. All of my Sylvaneth have a lot of foliage and plants on them, so this was always going to be a very green, summery looking tree. I couldn't use my usual stuff though (Woodland Scenics fine foliage) as it is £17.00 a pack, and I'd need quite a bit for the tree, making it prohibitively expensive. Instead I ordered some wire wool. To start with I piled it on, but after some Twitter feed back from @Bishmeister and @Painted by G I teased it all out a lot more so that I ended up with a much more natural look. I then used an entire can go green spray paint to undercoat the wire wool. Before feedback: After Feedback: When that was dry I went out into the garage, got a big mixing bowl and started making a bowl of tree flock, pretty much exhausting my clump foliage stocks! I used quite big clumps and a variety of sizes and textures. I then went round the tree a bit at a time covering it with spray glue and tipping the clump foliage on. Once the whole tree was covered I gave it a good shake, turned it upside down and went over any patches that I had missed. Once I was happy I then sprinkled over some fine turf mix as well to even up the coverage and fill in any small gaps. Once this dried a bit I mixed water and PVA together and poured it into a spray bottle and generously coated the whole tree. This should make it fairly durable. I'll also add some matt varnish as well as I want to eliminate any shine from any PVA glue that has ended up on the tree itself.
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