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Rob P

The Trials and Errors of a 'New' Hobbyist - A Plog

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I've now started started the early stages of painting the Age of Sigmar starter set.

 

The purpose of this plog is to show a few of my wip attempts and, in the future of the fruits of my efforts. I also want to throw a few newb questions out there and tips, tricks, comments and criticisms are all fine. At this stage I am aiming for reasonable tabletop quality with the heroes looking a little about tabletop level.

 

Firstly, i'm working on the free WD Slaughterpriest. I'm primarily working on the skin at the moment.

 

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I'm also working on a couple of tester Liberators.

 

The left one has been dry brushed with (perhaps a little too much) Scorpion Brass over Warplock Bronze. The one on the right is being gradually layered.

 

My first thoughts are that the one on the left looks ok for how long it took. I've probably spent about an hour on the one on the right already and feel the contrast between the bronze and brass is too stark and i'm not 100% sure what areas to paint rather than the obvious raised surfaces. On the other hand the one on the left hardly shows the bronze through but it took less than 5 min. I'm leaning towards the lazy option! Convince me the layer effect will look better if I keep at it! What about what i've done on the left and then working up the most raised areas as per the right mini?

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Finally, i'm finding unprimed and unreachable areas on some of my primed models e.g. between the 'backpack' and the back on the Retributors. It's only noticeable if you look at them from the right (wrong) angles. Without painting unassembled (which I am not planning to do), do people have tips on getting in there or doesn't it really matter.

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The slaughterpriest is looking nice and moody already, good work!

The newer plastic kits have lots of annoying hard to reach places. My best advice is to avoid sub assemblies for now and to simply force two layers of basecoat down there, followed by a wash before painting the details around the hard to reach area. As you said they're only noticeable if you look at them the 'right' way. so nobody looking at your models is going to be too interested in them.

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I find that priming sub assemblies before assembling works best if only to avoid area of grey plastic showing. In thé hard to reach áreas the black will just look like shadow. 

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large.IMG_20161010_2056493.jpg

Current WIP.

 

Finding red does not like black undercoat. The dracoth is only on coat 1. Also finding that I should at least paint the underbelly of things before sticking them to base. Finding it very hard to get inside of things on many models.

 

Finally, messed up my putting a too bright white on the breastplate and head of the middle model. Tried to tone it back but it's noticeably brighter. I would welcome any thoughts on additional colours for the relictor. I want to the bone look but thinking of painting his badge, weapon and bits dangling from the banner.

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I  actually really like that its brighter on the breast plate and the head because those are where I would imagine more light to hit. I also really like the whole look of it but think it need another color (just to add some contrast to it) somewhere on it personally. Maybe the hammer, the symbol on his right part of the breast plate, and the long cloth parts waving around his legs?

Red is interesting with the undercoat because it looks a bunch brighter with white and darker with black, I personally like it on black because its a bit darker but it depends on how you want it to look.

Over all I think they all look great for being a new mini painter :D

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Nothing likes a black undercoat without a couple of thin coats. It's still great for beginners and very forgiving, but maybe give grey or Zandri Dust spray a try, with Nuln Oil to shade the gaps between surfaces if you're finding black a pain to paint over.

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It's been a slow week or so.

 

I've added a lot of red to the models.

 

Currently gone for Mephiston Red on the shields and on the body of the dracoth. These have 2-3 coats and really not happy about the coverage. Also spilt a load of Agrax Earthshade so added a coat of that to all the red bits to avoid wasting it.

 

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Not happy with the red at all.

 

I hope the layer coat will sort it out.

 

Also fairly certain the difference in colour between my layered model (second from left) and the drybrushed rest is down to me using a different colour rather than technique.

Edited by Rob P
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Looking grand Rob, the red's really striking on the shields. Mephiston Red's a tricky colour to layer up and the larger the surface, the more layers it'll take. It could be that your coats are just ultra thin - not necessarily a bad thing, just a very time consuming one! ;) 

Thankfully red's a pretty easy/forgiving colour to highlight, so it's downhill from here. :) 

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You often get an nervy/unhappy feeling following a base coat, particularly when it is on a single quite flat surface but it is amazing what the layer can do to change it and also when you complete the base. I've painted lots of units where I have not liked it at the stage you are on only to be pleased with the overall result. I would probably try to stick to layering with an edge highlight on the edge of the shield, maybe evil sons scarlet and the possibly an orange trollslayer? But not the whole way round. Looking forward to seeing further progress.

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Thanks for the morale booster.

 

I'll definitely go over it with Evil Suns Scarlet - just need to grab an orange for edge higlight as suggested.

 

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Back after a long break. My Stormcast are more or less done.

 

Some updates here.

 

Far from perfect, but i'm generally satisfied with the outcome.

 

A few learning points for me.

 

(1) Do not glue together unless you will be happy knowing there are bit you will never get to.

(2) Brass Scorpion layered looks loads different from Brass Scorpion dry brushed. See Dracoth armour vs all other Stormcast armour.

(3) Still happy with coverage of Mephiston Red

 

The Liberator shield doesn't look as scruffy in real life. The gray in the Stormcasts hair is more noticeable too. And the silver bits look layered.

 

C&C + advice welcome.

 

Will do Bloodbound next but already decided i'll be doing a third army which will be the main one. Not sure what faction yet.

large.IMG_20161218_1013146.jpglarge.IMG_20161218_1012581.jpg

 

large.IMG_20161218_1012399.jpglarge.IMG_20161218_1011052.jpg

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Can anyone give me some tips about working with resin and finecast?

I have a finecast Festus i'd like to put together in the new year and i've grabbed the FW Warhammer World Chaos Dwarf.

I know you should clean them in warm soapy water first (with tooth first).

The main questions I have are:

 

(1) Is finecast to be superglued?

(2) How does the finecast and resin cut compared to plastic? I've heard they behave differently

(3) Should I be concerned about breathing in the residue from either? (i.e. are they carcinogens?)

 

Thanks

 

Rob

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1. Yes

2. From my little experience, finecast is kinda soft and bendy, breaks easily and overally what Ive seen and read, GW failcast quality sucks bad. Dunno if theyve gotten it better nowadays, but when it came it was rubbish.

Resin, atleast what Ive seen, is harder than plastic but again, it can break the way plastic doesnt. 

3. If you sand resin and theres a lot of dust in the air, Id wear a mask. If youre just cutting it and doing a little something I wouldnt bother.

 

 

hope this helps :)

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Resin dust forms sharp little particles that can get into your lungs and get up to no good in there. Preferably clean it up outside with a mask, or at least cut it underwater (when it's cold and/or I'm lazy I'll just cut in a water bowl on the desk) to mitigate dust going in the air and lingering in your work area.

Finecast is much more plasticky than 'normal' resin. My best guess is that GW had to make compromises for safety with the material, which lead to it being ultimately not fit for purpose. You can't really sell normal resin to kids.

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Couple of questions:

(1)

Thinking of using paint retarder or a wet palette when painting because i'm trying to do product line at the moment and paint drying up is no ideal.

 

Any preference between the 2?

 

If paint retarder, is their any preference on brand? I am using citadel paints exclusively at mo.

 

For a wet pallete, is it just best to make one? (as far as I can tell it's tupaware + sponge + parchment + water). What are the downsides?

 

Is it best to grap the parchment from a cooking shop? Seems cheaper than hobby shop, but is it the same stuff?

 

(2)

What brand superglue are people using for resin?

 

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58 minutes ago, Rob P said:

Thinking of using paint retarder or a wet palette when painting because i'm trying to do product line at the moment and paint drying up is no ideal.  Any preference between the 2?

Personally I use thinning and retarding agents, although I'm seriously thinking about making a wet palette as I'm still getting it dry out before I'd like, so I'm going to say wet palette. 

58 minutes ago, Rob P said:

If paint retarder, is their any preference on brand? I am using citadel paints exclusively at mo.

There's nothing wrong with GW's paints, but have a look at Winsor and Newton or Liquitex artist's acrylic retarder - nice big bottle for about £5-10.  Vallejo make some drying retarder, but the Model Colour range one is a pain to get out of the 17ml dropper bottle, although they do an artist's version which is a 500ml tub.  You should be able to get them from a decent artist's shop, such as Ken Bromley Art Supplies (artsupplies.co.uk), Grantham's Art Discount (artdiscount.co.uk), or Jacksons Art Supplies (jacksonsart.com).

58 minutes ago, Rob P said:

For a wet pallete, is it just best to make one? (as far as I can tell it's tupaware + sponge + parchment + water). What are the downsides?

Yup, just make one - artist's one tend to be about £15-25.  Have a look at Tabletop Minion's video on it (he's friends with Tom Ales and Sam Lenz, both Slayer Sword winners, so I'm assuming it's been run past them): 

 

Kris Belleau also has a decent video on them.

Hope that helps!

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Finally finished the Slaughter Priest.

 

I know it's not top standard, but I am incredibly proud of this and I put a lot of effort in. I couldn't quite get the light right to show it off properly.

 

Definitely prefer characters that I can spend time on to line units, which I want to spend time on, but they just take so damn long to paint.

 

Still not happy with the red. I used Druchii Purple to shade and it has two highlights on it (which don't show well in the pics). The base colour is Mephiston Red. I've been told Khorne Red is more reliable.

large.IMG_20170122_1203487.jpglarge.IMG_20170122_1202376.jpglarge.IMG_20170122_1159426.jpg

 

Also here's the wet palette. I've found to be super useful and made for less than £4.

 

large.IMG_20170114_1912291.jpg

 

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Is that how wet a wet pallet is supposed to be? I am always hesitant with them, I don't know how damp they should be. I used a blue on one that was quite wet and it diffused through the kitchen roll really quick and it just didn't seem right.

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I didn't have any paint getting to the tissue (kitchen roll) and I thought I'd done it pretty wet.

What were you using to top it? I used baker's parchment paper.

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He looks pretty good. :)  Unfortunately, I can see a couple of mould-lines around the spiked ball and up the chain (whilst they'll show up when painted, they can be a pain to see prior to undercoating - sometimes I end up undercoating the model, finding a few mould-lines I missed, and having to touch that area back in).

1 hour ago, Rob P said:

I couldn't quite get the light right to show it off properly.

You could try making a "light-tent" using a cardboard box, some tracing paper, copier paper, and a desk lamp. Full details here: http://strobist.blogspot.co.uk/2006/07/how-to-diy-10-macro-photo-studio.html

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54 minutes ago, Rob P said:

I didn't have any paint getting to the tissue (kitchen roll) and I thought I'd done it pretty wet.

What were you using to top it? I used baker's parchment paper.

I am using these things that are rather ambiguously labelled as "grease proof bags" in my local DIY store. They aren't waxed, or silicon coated, so they do take water. They are perhaps a little thin. It works OK, paint lasts much longer than on a regular pallet, but it was a quick and dirty solution. Need to go to the BIG SHOP to get hold of some proper stuff I think.

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55 minutes ago, Cordova said:

He looks pretty good. :)  Unfortunately, I can see a couple of mould-lines around the spiked ball and up the chain (whilst they'll show up when painted, they can be a pain to see prior to undercoating - sometimes I end up undercoating the model, finding a few mould-lines I missed, and having to touch that area back in).

You could try making a "light-tent" using a cardboard box, some tracing paper, copier paper, and a desk lamp. Full details here: http://strobist.blogspot.co.uk/2006/07/how-to-diy-10-macro-photo-studio.html

Yeah, annoyed about mould line. Hopefully, will use what I've learnt to improve on future projects.

 

I'll have to try the light box technique for photos. Thanks for the info.

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9 minutes ago, Rob P said:

Yeah, annoyed about mould line. Hopefully, will use what I've learnt to improve on future projects.

Looking at where it is, if you're very careful, you might be able to remove it with the point of a scalpel, and run over the resultant void with some Leadbelcher, followed by some thinned Nuln Oil and a quick drybrush of Ironbreaker up the chain (I'm assuming that's how you did the metallics).  I would, however, recommend not doing this until you are confident doing it, and have practised on a bit of sprue first!

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22 minutes ago, DynamicCalories said:

I am using these things that are rather ambiguously labelled as "grease proof bags" in my local DIY store. They aren't waxed, or silicon coated, so they do take water. They are perhaps a little thin. It works OK, paint lasts much longer than on a regular pallet, but it was a quick and dirty solution. Need to go to the BIG SHOP to get hold of some proper stuff I think.

I had to hunt to get the parchment paper. Only had the bags you mentioned + grease proof paper in local supermarkets.

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