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21 minutes ago, Enoby said:

Unfortunately not working , but I do have a degree so I may as well use it ^_^

Jeah! Cool thing. ? I just read the form of citation and thought "Hey. This person uses correct citation and quotes the sources correctly". ? 

But for me it is the same when I read studies, which compare human behaviour to animal behaviour or behavioural studies which assume that a certain behavior is connected to genetics.

Especially based on the studies of Stern, who like you already said found out that children already recognize social behaviour at a very young age, I would assume that many things that we consider to be male or female is already formed in the earliest years and in very subtle ways. So even though we might not want to enforce gender roles, we still might do it, especially through the way we move, behave and act. 

I, myself, would be considered a woman based on @Cerlins assumptions. I know he also said that there are exceptions. But in the end I would say that there are more exceptions to the rule than otherwise. I also think it depends more on the social groups behaviour how a person reacts. Boys in pure girl groups tend to be forced into "men roles", while a girl in a pure boys territory tends to be forced in "woman roles". I think this is a very interesting topic. But I would assume that there is no such things as a connection between animal behaviour and human behaviour. At least I don't know any study that proves this. 

People often just assume that there might be a connection, but in the end I have never seen any data supporting this.

Edited by Infeston
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7 minutes ago, Infeston said:

Jeah! Cool thing. ? I just read the form of citation and thought "Hey. This person uses correct citation and quotes the sources correctly". ? 

But for me it is the same when I read studies, which compare human behaviour to animal behaviour or behavioural studies which assume that a certain behavior is connected to genetics.

Especially based on the studies of Stern, who like you already said found out that children already recognize social behaviour at a very young age, I would assume that many things that we consider to be male or female is already formed in the earliest years and in very subtle ways. So even though we might not want to enforce gender roles, we still might do it, especially through the way we move, behave and act. 

I, myself, would be considered a woman based on @Cerlins assumptions. I also think it depends more on the social groups behaviour how a person reacts. Boys in pure girl groups tend to be forced into "men roles", while a girl in a pure boys territory tends to be forced in "woman roles". I think this is a very interesting topic. But I would assume that there is no such things as a connection between animal behaviour and human behaviour. At least I don't know any study that proves this. 

There's some really interesting research into hyperactivity of the agency detection device (Guthrie, 1993) that might explain why we anthropomorphise animal psychology. It's very off topic, but it is an interesting theory which may explain why it's very tempting to coalesce human and animal psychology. I'll stop talking about it now, though - I don't want to derail the thread too much! 

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1 minute ago, Enoby said:

There's some really interesting research into hyperactivity of the agency detection device (Guthrie, 1993) that might explain why we anthropomorphise animal psychology. It's very off topic, but it is an interesting theory which may explain why it's very tempting to coalesce human and animal psychology. I'll stop talking about it now, though - I don't want to derail the thread too much! 

Okay. This seems interesting. I will look into it. Thanks! ? 

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I never really saw this as a problem in my own gaming community. We have plenty of female gamers of all ages. Most of us see them as simply members of our community and it’s never been an issue. As for GW hiring “eye candy,” well, I just think they’re showing our female community members that they’re a part of the industry as much as their male counterparts. 

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1 hour ago, Enoby said:

It's a very interesting topic, though I feel there's a danger to proclaiming that men generally like one thing and women generally like another, because that in itself perpetuates gender stereotypes which may be what's causing these differences in the first place. You mention non-human primate studies, which are indeed interesting, but there's quite a big difference between humans and even the great apes. To give an example, Chimpanzees are well known for infanticide (Arcadi, et al. 1999; Sakamaki, et al. 2001), but it would be dangerous to assume that the same is true for humans. We have many psychological similarities, but loads of differences too. Other studies (Stern, 1989) would suggest that how we treat human children in regards to gender stereotypes influences the children's behavior and reactions. To get back to the point, I'm not sure it'd help to create a bigger gap between men and women's hobbies in the case of GW - the more we think of games as "men's things", the more women will feel unwelcome about joining.  I understand the point you're making, but as a woman, I personally don't feel totally at ease when being told that my gender would be more likely to like painting - it makes me feel almost as if I shouldn't be enjoying the game for the sake of the game. I'm certain you didn't mean anything by it - you even mentioned outliers - but I feel it's not a particularly useful point. 

Cheryan el al. (2009) conducted a particularly interesting study which looked at women's participation in computer science. To quickly summarise their findings, they found that women felt less at ease in a masculin environment which reduced their sense of ambient belonging and stunted their interest in the subject. Now, Warhammer isn't quite computer science, but it may carry over - the more masculin an environment appears, the less likely women are to take part in it as they don't feel like they belong. 

 

 

Just to note, I'll apologise in advance if this comes off as confrontational - I just enjoy debates like this :) I'm not trying to attack you or anything like that! 

Nothing personal here. I avoid the political because a) its in my job and b) I like to keep politics out of my hobby.

You said something about masculine space in comp sci. Which means there are feminine spaces too in other careers. The practical question is should people be at war to change the space to match what they are , accept the differences, or choose where to participate.

This claim of gaming as a masculine space just reinforces my point. You could argue that it can be "constructed" differently, then we are doing social construction, which is political, and something we should avoid here on TGA if you want to keep the peace. 

There is a political element to change masculine spaces. Again, this is a rabbit hole that if we jump down will divide the community and distract from the game.

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1 hour ago, RexHavoc said:



I have to admit, I don't really get this whole diversity thing (I grew up watching/reading mostly heroic women, which people now claim don't exist- bizarre!), I really don't see the need for it. If you make a strong, interesting product for one demographic that should be fine. The only reasons behind it is money, GW wants more. If you make a strong product in the first place it should appeal to people outside that original demographic, there shouldn't be a need to make changes to either the business model or the product to bring people in. I really don't understand the need for people to be 'represented' in a game to play it. I certainly don't feel that I'm represented by anything in any of GW products, I'm certainly not a huge muscled killing machine and I'm not a big shouty smashy green thing. I enjoy the warhammer universe because of the things they are not-they are an escape from modern life, I don't need to see myself in a game to want to play it. But that might be horse for courses!

I was always under the impression that the main issue with the lack of women in the hobby was (as demonstrated by some of the comments on social media) is that men can not act correctly when a woman is involved. 

 

There are several political movements in the West that see diversity as an end, and not as a side product of liberty and prosperity. So they push for it everywhere, including hobbies.

I think GW is being pressured by these same forces. If they are smart, they will stick to what the customers want and not what is political.

This could be more types of armies, etc. And if people buy them great! Shoehorning 21st century politics into the game in a way that does not match the setting or the customer wants may well lead to trouble.

I want this hobby to be economically viable, fun to play and build, and apolitical.

 

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I can't believe the carry-on (OK, I can, sadly) online about GW getting a guest host from a mob that make videos about games... to make a video about a game! Shocker of the century.

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6 minutes ago, Lousy Beatnik said:

I can't believe the carry-on (OK, I can, sadly) online about GW getting a guest host from a mob that make videos about games... to make a video about a game! Shocker of the century.

If you think that's what the conversation is about, I think you've boarded the wrong train. :)

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55 minutes ago, Sleboda said:

If you think that's what the conversation is about, I think you've boarded the wrong train. :)

Hmm? I know what the conversation is about. I'm saying what it should be! It should be as simple as that, GW got someone extra in for the promo videos.

Not a big deal, but predictably, there's some pretty ordinary discussion online.

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4 hours ago, Enoby said:

It's a very interesting topic, though I feel there's a danger to proclaiming that men generally like one thing and women generally like another, because that in itself perpetuates gender stereotypes which may be what's causing these differences in the first place. You mention non-human primate studies, which are indeed interesting, but there's quite a big difference between humans and even the great apes. To give an example, Chimpanzees are well known for infanticide (Arcadi, et al. 1999; Sakamaki, et al. 2001), but it would be dangerous to assume that the same is true for humans. We have many psychological similarities, but loads of differences too. Other studies (Stern, 1989) would suggest that how we treat human children in regards to gender stereotypes influences the children's behavior and reactions. To get back to the point, I'm not sure it'd help to create a bigger gap between men and women's hobbies in the case of GW - the more we think of games as "men's things", the more women will feel unwelcome about joining.  I understand the point you're making, but as a woman, I personally don't feel totally at ease when being told that my gender would be more likely to like painting - it makes me feel almost as if I shouldn't be enjoying the game for the sake of the game. I'm certain you didn't mean anything by it - you even mentioned outliers - but I feel it's not a particularly useful point. 

Cheryan el al. (2009) conducted a particularly interesting study which looked at women's participation in computer science. To quickly summarise their findings, they found that women felt less at ease in a masculin environment which reduced their sense of ambient belonging and stunted their interest in the subject. Now, Warhammer isn't quite computer science, but it may carry over - the more masculin an environment appears, the less likely women are to take part in it as they don't feel like they belong. 

 

 

Just to note, I'll apologise in advance if this comes off as confrontational - I just enjoy debates like this :) I'm not trying to attack you or anything like that! 

With all studies about male/female preferences, it is best to keep in mind that the difference inside those groups are bigger than the difference between those groups. 

What they refer to is mostly the likelihood of finding a male who shows x trait vs a female who shows x trait. It doesn't refer to either group having the trait. 

If you have a large group of males and a larger  group of females, you will be able to generate more interest in an idea (measured by active participants) then women. And, the reverse if that idea is presented as an object.

The problem is that the difference scale as we age and have more freedom to pursue what interests us. So, we get less likely to pursue something we might enjoy vs something we definitely enjoy. Which is rational. 

So, getting girls early and not terrifying them with fetishization, or devaluing their specific interest in the hobby is an important move for GW if it wants to aim for growth. 

Edited by whispersofblood
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As someone in the process of creating a Warhammer community in my local area(which is a university town), I have seen firsthand that people want characters to represent them. I am typically drawn to factions that have a tragic or tortured history, and if a setting doesn't really have one, I can't get into it. Similarly; I have a female friend who loves the Daughters of Khaine. I have also spoken to someone who tries to make rpg characters that emulate her personality and personal faith. 

The reality is that Warhammer/wargaming is a hobby that has historically been favored by and seems to mostly consist of white guys. The problem with saying, "But there's a Space Marine chapter that's Mongolian/Polynesian/Black" is that it seems like token diversity. In Warhammer Fantasy, we endlessly talked about the Old World, but Cathay and Araby can't get armies? The real world is extremely diverse, but Warhammer doesn't show that. 

There is a difference between forced and natural diversity in a setting. When Marvel comics start making replacements to superheroes and loudly proclaim " LOOK AT THE KOREAN HULK", that feels weird. But when you have a character who happens to have darker skin, happens to be female, happens to be transsexual, and is just there, being a natural fit for the story/setting, that is what diversity should be. A realistic representation of people. And we do need that. 

I don't think Becca Scott was chosen specifically for her gender, but I'm glad it created this thread. There's a real discussion to be had on the diversity or lack of, in our beloved hobby and setting. 

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8 hours ago, Overread said:

Thing is this also counts for boys too! 

Not saying it ain't the case. But no matter how we look at it, it is as Cerlin said there are are gender specific preferances. So why a boy may face "just" the its for kids/costs too much/etc problem, a female hobbiest will have to face all that AND the hassing from other girls. Not that it wouldn't happen to a buy if he decides to lets say pick up ballet. It is just that as far social interactions go females are much better at them then males, and this is both a good and a bad thing. Because in general the physical solution of problems, males use, are generally not so well recived in this day and age. Social stuff on the other hand is ok. I me

 

8 hours ago, Cerlin said:

 

7 hours ago, Cerlin said:

The question then becomes; if GW or TGA is interested in seeing more ladies in the hobby, then should there be more focus on community and painting to encourage those who would not be tempermentally inclined to join the hobby normally to do so?

I don't think GW cares much about the gender or what ever of a person, as long as the person is a paying customer. From a company point of view it is probablly moot, if the buyer is this or that gender. I just hope for them that in the search for finding more buyers, they don't end up like the comic industry, that got themself so entangled in social politics mess, that in a decade of super hero movie blockbusters, they manged to make their marker smaller and smaller. In general anything that has less to do with competition and male centric drives would help. The endorsment of higher status females also works, makes the thing less "for boys only", and you can get that with money hiring people. I wouldn't start with females making huge armies, but painting or stuff like cos play. Specially cos play would definitly help.

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The reason Becca was hired is because it was a good business move for GW, they didn't just roll a dice for the geek n sundry cast and then hire who came up.

I think it's a good move, new fresh presenter, someone outside the company, someone who is part of another community and somone who is female.

AoS2 is a real polished product in every way compared to AoS1 and it's good to see the design choices extend into all aspects.

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1 hour ago, Ar-Pharazôn said:

The real world is extremely diverse, but Warhammer doesn't show that. 

Well that has more to do with the company side of hobby. If you take a group of males, and lets assume those are western males, as problly it is the case with GW games fans. Anything that can find interest among a large part of that population is good. You of course want some varity, that is why you get the mongol or viking space marines. But an army directed at a group, and it doesn't really matter how the group is formed, that is not a large part of the buyers group, is just going to be a waste of money. This of course doesn't mean there are 0 dudes who want to play a destruction orc that is hindukush/afganistan inspired, or that such an army couldn't be cool. It just wouldn't be very profitable.

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5 hours ago, Cerlin said:

Nothing personal here. I avoid the political because a) its in my job and b) I like to keep politics out of my hobby.

You said something about masculine space in comp sci. Which means there are feminine spaces too in other careers. The practical question is should people be at war to change the space to match what they are , accept the differences, or choose where to participate.

This claim of gaming as a masculine space just reinforces my point. You could argue that it can be "constructed" differently, then we are doing social construction, which is political, and something we should avoid here on TGA if you want to keep the peace. 

There is a political element to change masculine spaces. Again, this is a rabbit hole that if we jump down will divide the community and distract from the game.

You raise some good points. I agree that we should avoid politics, but unfortunately that can be very difficult to do as it's so ingrained in everything (as I'm sure you know). 

To keep it short, I believe that we should aim to remove both feminine and masculin stigma around certain jobs and hobbies (making them more towards neutral). This doesn't mean changing core features of a hobby, but rather things like being more inclusive with characters or presenters. I'll try not to get started on any debates about free will, but as we saw with Cheryan et al.'s (2009) study, an overly masculine environment does seem to make women feel unwelcome; demasculinising the hobby to some extent may help reduce this effect, and I think that's a good thing (and I imagine GW does as well because more women = more money). I don't think the inclusion of more female characters and presenters is too political or controversial. 

But anyway, I do agree with your point that a debate like this can often spiral into political hell which is unpleasant for all involved, so I've tried to keep my rebuttal as brief as I could. 

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Well about male/female stuff. Males are competition focused a lot more, at least in the common understanding of word competition. So lets say in sports, you have both male and female version of probablly every sport imaginable, not sure if there is a male version of synchronised swimming or female version of water ball.

But if you check the fans, you will notice that the number and intensity of fandom among males and females is different. And not just because males are more mono focused then females . IMO it is an extension of the old tribal ways humans. And while there are things like female hooligans, the number of them is drasticly lower then that of males. And I don't think any take part in the official fights hooligans have.

The only question is, is table top gaming the same as sports, or to what extent is it the same as sports. Which could or maybe couldn't warrent it  as a male centric activity. 

Quote

To keep it short, I believe that we should aim to remove both feminine and masculin stigma around certain jobs and hobbies (making them more towards neutral).

That doesn't really work, the more equal a sociaty gets the , which is by the way shocking, the divide between the male and female dominated professions get bigger. The scandinavians had a few studies about it.

 

Quote

I'll try not to get started on any debates about free will, but as we saw with Cheryan et al.'s (2009) study, an overly masculine environment does seem to make women feel unwelcome

Yeah, but that has to do with many things. First of all males can't compet againsts females within the same group hierachy. Second any group that was priviously male dominated that adds a large number of females has its socials standing lowered, making it less interesting for males to climb the rankings.  So yeah it is a natural reaction.

 

Quote

emasculinising the hobby to some extent may help reduce this effect,

Well while that does make it easier for females to take part, it doesn't really help the males. And with them, at least initially being the majority of the group, it is kind of a understandable that they would not like it. Any job that was dominated by males and then went to be dominated by females, has undergone drastic changes to a point, where it is very hard for a male to not just climb that status ladder within the job, but even to take part in it. It does that time, but just look how teachers status changed from XIX century to today, or how MD  status looks like in post soviet countries, where it is dominated by females in everything but surgery.

 

Edited by blueshirtman
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There seems to be a strong sentiment that men and women look for different things in games; namely, men look for the game's system and women look for more community focused things, or artistic persuits. While it may sound sensible, the evidence does not support the conclusion. 

Unfortunately there are very few studies on tabletop games that I could find, but when asking women about why they play MMORPGs Royse et al. (2007) found that women reported they played games for system mastery and competition. The none gamers in the study reported that they didn't like games because they felt they were a waste of time, and due to negative perceptions about gaming culture. Taylor (2003) also conducted a study looking at similar things (also MMORPGs) and found that women played for a multitude of reasons, including system mastery and status, as well as social interaction and team play. 

To conclude, the evidence shows that the sentiment that female gamers are not interested in competition and system mastery to be false. It's an understandable mistake to make, considering how ingrained gender stereotypes are, but it's untrue and we'd do best to appreciate that interest in games, when interest is present, is not that different between genders. The reason that we see fewer women in the gaming community may be because of the view of the community itself, again referring to Cheryan et al.'s (2009) study. 

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I know that it is Becca's Job to make how to play Videos, but was she really the Best fit here?

I mean, I looked at her Twitter account, to see if I should follow her. And besides advertising her Videos there is no Hobby related content.

Warhammer Community has women like sarah, Laura and Ceri Robson. All those accounts are mainly GW related.

To mention a nun GW Channel. Teri Litorco (she is working with Becca, isn't she). Her account is more believable, to be a hobbyist than Becca's Account is.

What is the better advertising. Someone who make it because he got paid or someone who makes it because of passion.

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I believe this is a proven concept. Bring a girl, who isn't connected to the hobby and she will look stupid while presenting and people won't accept her but bring a girl, who is good looking and actually understands and is interested in what she presents and you have suddenly created another attraction point. I mean, look at Gillyweed and Sjokz.

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I think GW are definitely courting individuals previously outside their main demographic of white males. If you look at sculpts over the last few years there has been a significant increase in gender and racial diversity. For example Shadespire released with a female character and, at least according to official colour schemes, a multi ethnic khorne warband as opposed to the warhammer fantasy nordic style. You can also see in the new role models comic that they are showing a lot more diversity. 

To some extent this makes sense as a business because most of their core audience as is probably doesn't care that much either way about diversity. Out of most people I play with I think most of us don't really care either way about getting women into the hobby. Though I am aware there is quite a lot of "alt right" feeling among "nerds". 

Personally I quite like that warhammer is a hobby I can enjoy "with the lads". Most of my group are guys in their twenties with partners at home. So for us playing warhammer isn't too different than going down the pub. 

That said we play at a venue other than the local GW store. I don't really like going into the official store for various reasons. When I do though I often see transgender women and nerdy women. They seem like the sort of people who would ****** me off so I'm glad they've got their own community and place to play. 

Ultimately I think having more female sculpts is a good thing. At the same time I'd rather keep my group to mostly blokes and avoid people likely to make diversity a big issue ala fem 40k. 

As for Becca Scott she is clearly just a paid presenter designed to help showcase AoS as a game. 

Edited by Gaz Taylor
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26 minutes ago, blueshirtman said:

Well about male/female stuff. Males are competition focused a lot more, at least in the common understanding of word competition. So lets say in sports, you have both male and female version of probablly every sport imaginable, not sure if there is a male version of synchronised swimming or female version of water ball.

But if you check the fans, you will notice that the number and intensity of fandom among males and females is different. And not just because males are more mono focused then females . IMO it is an extension of the old tribal ways humans. And while there are things like female hooligans, the number of them is drasticly lower then that of males. And I don't think any take part in the official fights hooligans have.

The only question is, is table top gaming the same as sports, or to what extent is it the same as sports. Which could or maybe couldn't warrent it  as a male centric activity. 

That doesn't really work, the more equal a sociaty gets the , which is by the way shocking, the divide between the male and female dominated professions get bigger. The scandinavians had a few studies about it.

 

Yeah, but that has to do with many things. First of all males can't compet againsts females within the same group hierachy. Second any group that was priviously male dominated that adds a large number of females has its socials standing lowered, making it less interesting for males to climb the rankings.  So yeah it is a natural reaction.

 

Well while that does make it easier for females to take part, it doesn't really help the males. And with them, at least initially being the majority of the group, it is kind of a understandable that they would not like it. Any job that was dominated by males and then went to be dominated by females, has undergone drastic changes to a point, where it is very hard for a male to not just climb that status ladder within the job, but even to take part in it. It does that time, but just look how teachers status changed from XIX century to today, or how MD  status looks like in post soviet countries, where it is dominated by females in everything but surgery.

 

(Sorry, I don't think I saw your post after the edit, so I'll try reply properly)

Could you provide the Scandinavian study, please. I've been unable to find it. 

You mention that men and women can't compete in the same group hierarchy. What exactly do you mean by this? I can definitely see the argument for physical activities, but in Warhammer there's nothing to suggest that men and women will perform inherently differently. 

I don't think making a hobby more gender neutral would harm males either, though. I'm not suggesting making the hobby feminine, but rather less masculine (so more towards neutral - so both genders can enjoy it without stigmatization). The hobby wouldn't need to become dominated by women, just more welcoming towards them. Assuming GW isn't going to pull anything like "The Emperor is really a women" and instead would just add more female representation where it would make sense, I can't see the average man being upset by that - but if so, why? Regardless, I feel we may have strayed onto gender representation in the workplace, which is a different kettle of fish to gender representation in hobbies. 

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I do think they've done a pretty good lately, especially with AoS, by adding non-matched Stormcast. That's one army I'd love to see as 50/50. Release a sensible female guard regiment and I'll be thrilled (sorry Victoria Miniatures!) Actually, there's a brilliant lady in wargaming.

Some people look for problems, though. I read one person sooking about how they added ****** to the new wraiths. Even when it's plain to see they have corsets, and no flesh there anyway!

(The "*****" isn't swearing ?)

Edited by Lousy Beatnik

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It's 100% to get more females into the hobby. You can see this on one of GW's official reports from last year (can't recall which, but it's accessible to public).

They had three key objectives for this year according to their directorate, one of which is getting more females into the hobby. This is undoubtedly part of that.

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I don't think Becca is "eye's candy", just becouse she is a woman she is not in that possition to give dudebros "eye's candy"

I think it's a good thing, we see more and more female models and a more diverse cast in the Warhammer world (and yes, I know about DoK and as much as I like half-snake woman, DoK is just your typical power fantasy woman with bikini armors and good looks. It's a trope, I like the army and the looks buts is just that trope)

I know a lot of people needs some form of representation in the media for them to enjoy it, damn, I'm one of those and that's why I started to like Stormcast more when we start to get models without the helmet. The same goes to my girlfriend, who wasn't too sure about picking 40k or AoS untill she saw Sylvaneth and their Queen and say "that's it, that woman is badass, I want that army"

If there is something that this hobby (any hobby really) needs is new people joining all the time, with the new "kids-friendly" books for the youngest audience and more female models GW is going in the right track to open their market and help the hobby grow. You can focus your game in just men and nothing more and that could give you some time and money but as time passes, those men will have to stop playing (old age, family don't let them enough time) and if you didn't help new people to enter you will find youlself with no one to play your game.

That's just from a business point of view, from a social point of view more representation and open community is the right thing to do.

 

TL;DR: I'm pretty sure that if Becca was a guy we couldn't be having this topic and no one could have put in doubt what is her experience with wargaming, so I think we might have a problem in how we see the world. More people in the hobby whatever their sex/gender is will always be a good thing and usually the prejuices over a gender within a community is a part of why no new people joined the community.

 

Edited by Dragobeth
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Really interesting topic and one that genuinely fascinates me on a number of levels.

I've been in the hobby for over two and a half decades now (sorry folks, I am getting on ;)) and believe that one of the biggest things that's happened in that time is there's now less stigma attached to enjoying fantasy based hobbies.  I mean that in every aspect, from enjoying films and books through to wargaming and LARP/cosplay.  It's not that long ago you wouldn't volunteer that you played Warhammer because people's opinion of you would immediately drop.  Thankfully (on the whole) that's no longer the case, Lord of the Rings felt like a key pivot point and it was "OK" to enjoy things that had Orcs and Elves in and it's once more popular to play board games with friends.

Since I've been hobbying there does seem to have been an increase in females joining the hobby, both coming in with partners and on their own.  It's a trend I really hope continues because I actually think it improves the hobby, it shows that it's not a blokes game and if I'm honest 

GW's choice of Becca Scott was an interesting one and I have to hold my hands up and admit I didn't have a clue who she was initially...  However it's a pretty clever one, her in combination with Duncan and Peachy have done a really good collection of introductory videos for anybody who's new to AoS (though I still say Brian Blessed rolling dice would have been amazing!).  They provide a really good front face to our game.  I don't think attracting females has anything to do with it from a business point of view it's about attracting customers, regardless of gender, colour, age etc - the dice don't care who's holding them afterall.

From a community point of view I think keeping positive and welcoming is the most important aspect.  Don't be "over the top" with praise but equally don't hold it back - and I mean this in reference to any gender.  Be polite and courteous even if you disagree with somebody and the rest just comes with time :)

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