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  • Eevika

    The Hag!

    By Eevika

    The Troggoth Hag is definitely a piece I believe every Troggoth army needs. It's amazing as a model and amazing on the table. I rarely do such detailed eyes and faces but when working on a model that is the centrepiece of your army you want to spend some extra time just to make it special. This is surely the best work I have ever done on a models face and I think there is just a lot of character and emotion on the model.  My smaller Troggoths are just green and blue but for this model I felt like it really needed another color to make it pop more so I asked some people what would be best and after many recommendations I decided to go for a nice bright orange and I think it really fits nicely. This picture also shows well the addition of mushrooms all over the model. Even though my Troggoth army is based on swamp themed bases with lots of water effects the mushrooms really tie it to my Grots and Squigs that are based on more rocky bases but with lots of mushrooms. The base on this model was definitely one of the most fun parts of the process of creating it. Here we see a detail shot of the base with the small Free Guild soldier hiding from the lumbering Hag. I love the base I did here. The water effects came out nicely and the base that comes with the Hag looks really nice after I added all kinds of fun stuff like mushrooms and skulls to it.  
    • 4 comments
    • 153 views
 

17-12-18 Day 1

So I figured I'd give this site blog thing a try for something mostly to keep track of myself as I work through the year and for when I don't want to post this kind of thing to my regular blog, which I at least try to keep a little more meaningful.   So as of this, the first day I'm undertaking this quest to reduce the number of boxes I own, I'm starting the count at 0. That doesn't mean I don't own any boxes of unbuilt stuff, but that I'd rather not spend a few hours finding and counting them. And since my objective is to reduce the total rather than reach a specific number, the more I keep that value in the negative (less than 0) then I'm winning. As soon as it swings to positive I'm losing (as then I own more boxes than I do right at this very moment.   So Day 1 Count 0! 

Overread

Overread

A thick forest

These took me MUCH longer then they should! I should really get back to working on models, I need 30 more Dryads, Alarielle & Derpthu ready for Sheffield Slaughter in late February. I'm glad to have the bases done for now, I will crack on with trees once my models are ready for SS :D.  

AaronWIlson

AaronWIlson

The General on Griffon

This one is just a gorgous model.🤩 I had so much fun with this one. The base alone was a place of tiny rocky happiness
This griffon took me 3 weeks to paint it completely. I spend alot of thoughts for the styling of his back. Which animal should it represent? And what was paintable?
I made 3 versions. Something unreal, a leopard and a cheetah fur.

In the end I took the leopard andI think it was the right choice. In my eyes it just looks amazing. Unfortunatly the painting took quit a long time. So I had the opportunity to play some epic games without him really being finsihed.
The rider was fun to paint too. I really like the yellow/blue color sheme and have never regreted this decision. It just looks fantastic. Even as WIP.


In the end the general on griffon looks like this:

This one is an autoinclude in each of my lists so far. Sometimes he has a bad day and kills not that much. But you can see in the eyes of the opposing general that this griffon always strikes fear into the hearts of the enemy.

Stulle

Stulle

The Knight Azyros

This Knight Azyros is obviously not a man of the city of Nordheim. But he`s a very good addition to a free guild army. His rerolling 1s on hit aura is just fantastinc for these big shooting units. So I just bought one in holidays and painted him in a week after coming home. There are many different colorshemes out there for those stormcast guys but I think the original one is just the best. Golden armor just kicks ass

I messed around with the wings alot. All was looking ugly. I just wasn`t able to paint those staight lines on them. In the end I just put some Layers of white on top. No it`s kinda ok i think. And I know that I will never try those wings again

Stulle

Stulle

The Greatswords

The week after the outriders of the former blog entry I painted this unit of 10 men with their mighty zweihanders.
I`m really happy with them and it was a pleasure to paint. I really like the armor which is kinda bigger than the one of the normal guards. But there is still enough cloth to give them the blue/yellow look and fit them into the whole Nordheim army. The different heads with more beards look pretty well too. It`s the first time I`m happy with the eyes I painted.
As you see the greatswords went with orange cloth stripes.

There is one special guy in this unit. I called him Iron Joe.

If he`s not too busy defending the growing empire against all sorts of monstrous filth he likes swimming, cycling and running
  At the moment these Greatswords aren`t used in battle and stay on the shelf. But im planning to build a more melee focuses force. And these guys will have an essential role in it.  

Stulle

Stulle

The Outriders

Painiting theses outriders at the beginng of may was somehow hard for me. I started with the horses and wasn`t very happy with how they turned out. Afterwards it was hard to muster the motivation to finsih them. On the other hand it was the first time that I experimented with not so obvious color/shade combinations. The grey horse, for example, is Stormvermin Fur with a shade of Seraphim Sepia. Doesn`t look that good for a horse. But I will use it for kinda moosy stones in the future
Painting the riders was more fun and in the process i god back my motivation. Here you see the full glory of the 12th Outrider detachment of the Nordheim army. I like the roman number on the blankets and the turquiose cloth to distiquish them from other detachments.

In the end I`m quit happy with them. Unfortunatly they are also on "wrong" bases.    

Stulle

Stulle

Slaaneshi Warriors: Resin Hell

Hello all. Post two is about the battleline I'll be working on.  First of all, Chaos Warriors. I already professed my love for the archetype in my previous post, but here I'm planning out my resplendent Slaaneshi champions. I'm using the model as basis for a kitbash: the helmet's horns will be shaved off and replaced by a plumed crest, the weapon replaced for a more elegant blade (I'm using Tree Revenant bits), the shield will have a Slaaneshi emblem (more on that below), the torn cape un-tattered (tried this with green-stuff to mixed results, but hey) and some extra gems added. 

Colour scheme is something I'm struggling with a little, though. I know the general colours I want: NMM purple for amour (still learning how to do that, though) Gold trim (also perhaps NMM, as I've tried the Valejo liquid metal range and it's such a pain to work with) Sea-green teal as the contrasting colour (gems and the basing water)  Rich pink as the complementary colour White for cloaks and tabards to balance out the dark colour I've just not exactly worked out how this will all fit together. I'm currently thinking white cloak and shields, purple NMM armour, minimal gold trim, pink crests and teal gems. I've put together a rudimentary colour tester for the basic warrior in paint. Let me know if you have any thoughts. 

As for the shields, I sculpted 4 Slaaneshi patterns on filed down chaos warrior shields with the plan to try out resin casting them (though, funny story: I had them ready for a mold pour for a few weeks. The super-sculpey I was using as the base kinda melted the edges of the plastic, ruining the shields. I got annoyed, tore the green stuff off and stuck it on new shields, which is why the designs are a little janky and not quite symmetrical. Oh well). So far resin casting results are mixed, but some have come out okay, and it's the only workable solution to crafting bespoke Slaaneshi shield designs.  In terms of the design, I wanted each to have the elegant curves reminiscent of Slaanesh's icon, but with slight design differences. I especially like first right and third right (using the prototype image). The first is supposed to resemble a melding of the male/female icon as symbol for gender-fluidity. The third is supposed to symbolize a unity with Chaos as a grand alliance, a Slaanesh icon with lines converging in a way similar to the classic eight-pointed star.  Oh, and lastly: an indication of my marauders. I'm a lore gamer, with mortals being the focus of my army, but I'm thinking of proxying them as Demonettes (hence the choice to use their claws) since they are some of the best Slaanesh units. The base is the namarti reaver. I remember seeing them when the Idoneth previews came in. I was already considering some kitbash to make a Slaaneshi marauder, with little which appealed to me, but upon seeing these new Idoneth I KNEW: dynamic, mixed gender, and simply gorgeous models. True, the strange markings on the armour will be a little inconsistent with my  army, but I think the models work as a kitbash.  The recipe is basically  Slaaneshi heads (hellstrider bits for men, independent female heads with horns added for women), hellstrider shields, revenant weapons and demonette claws. I'm happy with how these have turned out, and am already beginning the paint job. White cloaks and shields, purple armour (not NMM, just a simple bit of edge highlighting), pink hair and tassel, teal gems, black trousers, brown boots, and three skintones (dark skintone, tan caucasian and pallid). I'm starting the cloaks, going to give wet blending a try... 

Klamm

Klamm

Intro - First Miniatures

Hello all. Having just begun a busy MA, I'm of course trying to cope with the pressure by taking on a massive hobby project  I've started a lot and completed a little, but, as my holidays begin, I've decided to commit and finish my project. Slaanesh has always been my fave Chaos god, so when I returned to the hobby, I knew I wanted to finally realise my vision for a warband of slaaneshi mortals. Lore and other models forthcoming, I decided to start off by simply enjoying/getting to know the mini of the chaos warrior.  Seems odd to start off a Slaaneshi plog by painting up everything but. I have this odd neurosis about my painting shortcomings, and so put off the things I WANT to work on as I'm afraid I won't do them justice. Either way, though, since my glorious Slaaneshi warriors shan't be sporting tattered capes or Viking horns, I wanted to paint up some more 'traditional' warriors (stinky bois, nerdy bois, angry bois, and one hipster who thinks the old four are too 'mainstream'). I'll probably use them as unit fillers, though my Glitterhost is sure to get a perverse pleasure from tempting worshipers of other gods to fight their battles. 

The basing is that of a Hyshian alpine river, the realm of light being this host's home. I've made some generic terrain to fit with it: grassy outcroppings and corrupted tar-pits.  Coming up: Slaaneshi Chaos Warriors and Marauders (kitbashed Namarti reavers) 

Klamm

Klamm

Morgusson and the Trenchers

Before they were mustered for Sigmar's wars against the forces of Chaos, Morgusson and his Irondrakes had been responsible for locating abandoned underground fortresses and blowing out whatever vile denizens had since occupied them. Morgusson especially enjoyed those brief moments between when the barbs of one of his grudgehammer torpedoes dug into some monstrous rat's flesh and when the attached explosive detonated. It's the little things. Here Morgusson and his trenchers are taking in a bit of air after having ignited an underground Pestilens laboratory below the ruins of a fortress.

Zamik

Zamik

30 days of hobby: Varanguard & Hellstriders

So for today I kitbashed some DoK khinerae into some shield maiden-esque hellstriders of slaanesh as well as started slapping some paint onto my slaaneshi Varanguard.   I think they're coming out quite nicely it's nice to get more of my chaos stuff sorted too. Archaon and the Varanguard have really been giving me enjoyment doing chaos.

Lightbox

Lightbox

The Ambermage

Right after the artillery I went with a single character and some tiny conversions. Basically just putting two dogs on a larger base to accompany this beauty. The female mage is Autumn Bronzeleaf from Reaper Miniatures. The doggies are from some companion pack. Also from Reaper Miniatures. For me this model had a lot of first timers to offer. First female character, First non GW and first metal miniature. I like how she looks now. The eyes could have had more contrast and the cloak looks more dirty than properly shaded. This could have been better. Maybe next time
Amber is a specialisation for the Battlemage. The Ambermage has a spell granting +1 to wound for a single melee unit. So you need a marker showing that a unit is affected by this spell. I don`t really like those markers made from cardboard or plastic. So i made my own one. This little fella shows everyone that you should`t mess with the boys nearby Here`s the final picture of them:

Stulle

Stulle

30 days of hobby: Varanguard

So today wasn't an hour of painting... It was more a half hour of building / converting as between picking up a doctor's note and wargaming I didn't have much time today or motivation to paint. But hey any hobby is better than none   Today I finally built up a rider for my third Varanguard as I had used a rider ages back to make a chaos lord. This new lord is pretty simple, he's the manticore sorcerer lord with a shield. But he looks very nice on his steed and makes a great tzeentchy varanguard.   The steed I lost a head for somehow so he instead had a cold one head with some greenstuffed armour to make him fit in more which I think looks nice He also had a great first showing tonight when his unit charged in and butchered mazarral the butcher!! Go team!

Lightbox

Lightbox

Rockets!

I really like artillery. It`s just facinating to have this big boom.
Thats why I directly bought 2 Helfire Rocket Batteries and painted them at once. This was before I really understood pointcosts and the principles of alliances and allegiances. Atm its 180 points for one of these bad boys. So two of them only barely fit into a free peoples army I had a lot of fun painting those. in the picture you may see that i magnetized them. One big magnet (5mm) at the end of the gun and a small one in each Wheel. I think they just look better without a base and so they fit to every underground. Man, it`s just fun to paint big rocket guns. I put quit some effort into them. This was the first time i made some color testing: If i recall it correctly its form left to right: Balthasar Gold, Balthasar Gold and a Layer of Gehennas Gold, Balthasar Gold and a Layer of Auric Amour Gold.
I don`t know anymore(was in april ;)). But I think i went with the Auric Amour Gold variant. Could also be the Gehennas. It`s definitly with heavy Agrax shading. Future projects will be documented here directly so i can always look it up if i forget color combinations i used.
Here the final pics:

At the end I`m really happy with how they turned out. Except for the eyes. I learned to paint better eyes later. Just don`t try to put the black dot in the middle of the white. It looks much much better if the black dot touches the upper of the eye. You`ll see in the next pictures. For example the Empire Great Cannon which is just a gorgeous model and the mother of all artillery pieces 🤩

Stulle

Stulle

30 days of painting: Archaon

So making up for being ill for like 10 days by painting up this beauty. Still got his hair to do and no doubt many other details but considering he started as grey plastic today I'm pretty happy with my work.   Absolutely lovely model to work with though I am terrified of painting Dorghar... That boy is big!

Lightbox

Lightbox

 

Narrative Play: Special Rules

So... I don't know how, but somehow it slipped my mind that the GHB 2018 contained more stuff I wanted to do in card form than just the allegiance abilities.
I needed someone from here to PM me if I could do something like the cards in the Warlord Edition.
My first thought was... "I already included everything in the Core Set, didn't I?"
I didn't.

So here's part 1 for the GHB:  
I'm trying something new with the boxes, they are now one piece, tuck boxes and fit on a single page. The downside: you have to glue it at the side and bottom. Score the fold lines before cutting the box out, I added marks to assist you. The front also needs to be cut along the lines and folded through the AoS logo, so it's more accessible. There are tiny white dots on the side, 10mm down from the top of the cover.

Let me know if you guys like this box style more (or less).  

Hanskrampf

Hanskrampf

4. Who's the Beatdown?

Who’s the Beatdown? is probably the most iconic piece of MtG theory ever written.  It has proven exceptionally fertile as the ideas within have been grown, developed and re-harvested again and again over time, and ported out and across all kinds of other game systems to varying degrees of success.  It is not perfect.  It is not scripture.  But it was one of the first on the scene to look beneath the surface of the game and emerge with something truly fundamental, important and consistently relevant.  I am aware of only a few attempts to apply Who’s the Beatdown theory to AoS.  None of them have been completely satisfying.  Yes, MtG is a very different game than AoS, but I don’t think that’s the problem.  The concepts are relevant, even if they have to be reframed a bit to match a different context.  The problem, I think, is that the current dearth of AoS theory makes it more difficult than it needs to be to fully develop Who’s the Beatdown in AoS terms. So buckle-up buttercup.  We’re going to try to apply what we learned last time and see what sparks might fly. Breaking Down the Beatdown What’s at stake in Who’s the Beatdown is the idea that in any given game, and indeed, at any given point within a game, a player’s chance of success is significantly improved if they properly understand their role in game relative to their opponent.  A player’s role can be fluid and can change match-up to match-up, and indeed, can change back and forth within a given match-up.  Misunderstanding your role oftentimes means misunderstanding what’s important.  Misunderstanding what’s important oftentimes means losing. Let’s start by reviewing a recent attempt to apply Who’s the Beatdown to AoS.  For this, we’ll use the relevant excerpt from THWG’s new workbook, reproduced in the spoiler below.  Please read through it before continuing on.  While reading it, take note of what you understand from the concept as outlined, what you can take away from it to help frame how you see the game (concept, from Latin concipere, “to take in and hold”).  I’ll share my take-aways below and we can compare notes, but I think it’s important that you meet it on your own terms first.   For me, it seems like it gets some things right and gets some things wrong, and leaves the over-all concept a bit too blurry, and therefore less useful then it could be.  But like Flores’ original piece, it does provide fertile ground to work on, to nurture and harvest and regrow the seeds that it plants. To do that work, I will have to introduce some new concepts.  But staying faithful to the original methodology, these new concepts will be derivative from our three starting elements (Space, Time, Variability) and therefore connected to our three essential resources (Presence, Pressure, Projection).  We don’t want to just create a pile of ideas; we want to create a framework within which each of our ideas are logically connected with each other, and through which a cohesive and functional perspective can emerge. What I think THWG’s piece really gets right here is the notion that risk is one of the key differences between how to play the two roles, and that advantage is one of the key elements in understanding what role to take.  What I think the piece gets wrong here is the actual assigning of the roles themselves.  What I think is under-developed is the defining and assessing of advantage and coming to grips with what’s important to each role. Let’s start with the roles.  In Flores’ original piece, he defines two possible player roles:  the Beatdown (or aggro) role, and the Control role.  Although the notions of Aggro and Control decks existed as archetypes way before Flores, what was inspired in his article was the insight that within the context of a particular match-up, an Aggro deck might actually be better served assuming the Control role, or vice versa, the Control deck might actually be best served playing the Aggro role; that is, although you may have designed your deck to be Aggro or Control, the specific context of the game might require you to play otherwise.  The key concept was to understand the power of the resources that you had available and that your opponent had available and their relationship to time.  An Aggro role was required when the resources you had available were less powerful than your opponent’s but were able to be brought online sooner.  The Control role was required when your resources were more powerful but required more time to deploy.  Thus the Beatdown player was the one who had a short-term advantage and thus had to try and win now, before they became outclassed.  They had to burn through their resources as quickly as possible and go for the throat.  They had to push the tempo and get more done in less time because if the game dragged on too long, they would lose.  The Control player, on the other hand, had to try and slow things down.  They had a long-term advantage.  Their role was to prolong the game however possible until the power of their late-game resources became overwhelming.  If they could hang on long enough and “turn the corner,” they would win. If we want to successfully apply the lessons of Who’s the Beatdown to AoS, it is critical to preserve the element of time in our understanding, as it is critical to the entire original notion.  We know from our previous work so far, that Time is one of the three essential elements in AoS, along with Space and Variance.  Time is best understood as a measure of change.  We use points to invest in Time whenever we buy Pressure.  Pressure is used to attack Space, which we invest in whenever we use points to buy Presence.  Space can be used to attack Time whenever Presence is used to control its vector speed, Projection. Here we can see that the fundamental difference between Pressure and Presence is their relationship with Tempo, which we will define here as the measure of the density of change generated per game-turn (how many moments they generate).  Pressure promotes tempo, Presence reduces it.   From here, we’re well positioned to start connecting the dots.  The Beatdown role is a role properly assumed by the player who stands to benefit from increasing Tempo.  The Control role is properly assumed by the player who stands to benefit from decreasing Tempo.  In its most extreme example, we could ask the question, which player would win if no further time elapsed in game (e.g. if each player passed on each and every remaining subsequent phase).  That player would be the one who would benefit from decreasing tempo, and as such, is the one whose chances of winning are best improved by assuming the Control role.  The player who would stand to lose in this hypothetical situation would benefit from pushing the tempo, and as such is the one whose chances of winning are best improved by assuming the Beatdown role.  They need to break the current game-state within which they are at a disadvantage.  The bigger the advantage gap, and/or the fewer number of game-turns remaining, the more Risk should be assumed by the Beatdown player, and conversely, the less Risk should be willingly accepted by the Control player.  Risk is the second new concept we need to introduce today, so let’s do that now before moving on to re-examine the examples from the spoiler. Risk is a derivative concept of Variance.  Variance is an essential element of AoS.  Pre-game, we are exposed to variance in the form of match-up uncertainty, scenario uncertainty, and (if you are using them) Realm rules.  In-game, Variance manifests in two powerful ways: unit action and turn initiative.  Almost all unit action contains some measure of randomness in order to quantify its effect: charge rolls introduce Variance into Projection; to Hit and to Wound rolls introduce variance into Pressure; save rolls introduce Variance into Presence, etc.  The sequence of play is also subject to Variance, as the turn order between rounds is determined by a roll-off.  Risk is the concept that we will use to talk about the implications of Variance on game-play.  We say that a play is advantaged when its odds of succeeding are greater than 1/2, and significantly advantaged when they are greater than 2/3.  Likewise, we say that an action is disadvantaged when its odds of succeeding are less than ½, and significantly disadvantaged when it is less than 1/3.  In a completely neutral game-state, we should consider action whenever it is advantaged, and avoid action when it is disadvantaged.  However, as our appetite toward Risk changes, so too should our assessment.  In high Risk situations, it may be completely appropriate for the Beatdown player to pursue significantly disadvantaged action (some chance of winning is better than no chance of winning), just as it may be completely appropriate for the Control player to avoid all but the most significantly advantaged actions.  Further, in high Risk situations it may be completely appropriate for the Beatdown player to plan for a sequence of events as if he was going to win the next turn initiative roll, just as it may be appropriate for the Control player to plan for a sequence of events as if he was going to lose the initiative roll.  Our Risk defines our disposition toward Variance—my chance of winning either depends to some extent on getting lucky, or my chance of losing depends to some extent on getting unlucky.  If the former, I need to consider ways of setting myself up to capitalize on that opportunity.  If the latter, I need to minimize the impact Variability can exert on my current position. Let’s return to our two examples.  Example #1 seems to be a match pitting a high Presence army (elite, re-rollable saves) against a high Pressure army (MW output).  There’s not really enough information provided to be clear about the situation, but if we take the example at its word and assume that the MW units will be able to produce an overwhelming advantage in 3 turns, then it’s pretty clear that the Presence army has to assume the Beatdown role.  It needs to drive the tempo quickly before its resource allotment in elite Presence is overwhelmed by the opponents investment in MW Pressure.  It’s a tough situation for the high Presence army since it is an army designed to play a Control role.  But that’s the importance of Who’s the Beatdown.  Fail to recognize the role you are actually in (as opposed to the role you had in mind before the game started), and you are much more likely to lose the game.  The army now needs to abandon its preplanned strategy and adapt to the situation at hand.  It needs to drive tempo and beatdown if it is going to win.  Conversely, the Pressure army needs to assume more of a control role than it might have been planning for.  As was articulated in the example, it needs to protect its two MW units, and protection is always an anti-tempo play.  It is the strategic use of Presence (place) to control circulation and threat, and thin out an opponent’s capacity to create a flurry of moments in their turn. In example #2 we see a match-up of a horde army with high Projection against a high Presence (tanky) army.  The strategy articulated in the example seems spot-on:  assume an immediate Beatdown posture relative to claiming the objectives, using initiative and superior projection to establish an advantage in Space that, if unanswered, will become inevitable over the long-term.  But note that as soon as that advantage is secured, the horde army needs to pivot and assume the Control role.  Once they have the advantage on objectives, they are no longer looking to play Beatdown.  They are looking to preserve the current state of affairs as much as possible.  Their primary concern from that point on is to slow the tempo of the game and ride out the victory, a task that they are well-suited to doing, since as a horde army they have a natural aptitude for controlling space through an abundance of place.  The tank army, on the other hand, is in an unenviable position.  They are forced early on into a Beatdown role for which they are poorly equipped.  The tanky army wants to play the Control role.  That’s the way the army is designed to work.  However for the player to succeed in this context he must identify that the roles have shifted, and do it early.  He must adapt to the situation by recognizing what’s important, what’s at stake, and what approach yields the best possible chance for success.  (Note, if they are playing a scenario with no central objectives, like, say, Total Commitment, the tanky army could conceivably reject the Beatdown role and play for the minor victory by committing to a Control role focused only on its own objectives.  If the horde army misplays, or if Variance produces some very favorable deviation, the path to a major might reveal itself). What’s interesting in these examples is that in both there are armies that, in order to improve their odds of winning, must adopt a style of play that is probably not what their owner envisioned when putting the list together.  It reinforces the key insights of Who’s the Beatdown?  In every game, and in every game-state within that game, there are two roles available to players.  The first is the Beatdown role, which corresponds to the player with long-term disadvantage.  Their best hope is to push tempo and maximize the benefit of their resources while they can in order to change the game-state into one with better long-term implications.  The second is the Control role, which corresponds to the player that has long-term advantage.  Their hope is to decrease tempo and preserve as much of the current advantaged game-state as possible.  The bigger the long-term advantage, or the nearer it is to becoming inevitable, the more each player increases their unique disposition to risk, taking on more in the case of the Beatdown player, or taking on less in the case of the Control player.   Let me know what your thoughts, reactions, criticisms or questions in the comments.        
 

Lemon Knuckles

Lemon Knuckles

Prince Rodrik's Band of Questing Knights

I am proud to present you one of my greatest treasures:  Prince Rodrik's Band of Questing Knights Yes, you can trust your eyes. These are the original miniatures (well at least 6 of 8 ) from the Battle Report "The Folly of Prince Rodrik" from White Dwarf No. 305 (pages 34-47). I bought them directly from GW employee Andrew Hoare, who built and painted 4 of them. He put the knights on eBay in August 2011, but just listed them as "Unique painted and converted Bretonnian foot knights". I spotted and identified them as the original knights from the WD battle report. So I was quite lucky to get them. They are absolutely unique. Before you ask, I already tried to find out what happened to the other two knights. Here's the answer I got from Andy Hoare:     Here is the page from White Dwarf 305 that shows them:   Here are some more detailed pictures of each knight: Prince Rodrik:
  Eduard the Enviable:
  Pietre, Beloved of Yordane:
  Fabien the Sophist:
  Roland the Bold:
  Harold the Filthy:

Duke of Gisoreux

Duke of Gisoreux

Comparison between different editions

I made some pictures that show similar miniatures from different editions for comparison.   The following picture is a comparison between Knights Errant and their former equivalents. On the left is a Feudal Knight from 1987 (2nd edition) from the "F7 Feudal Cavalry" series. The whole model including the horse is made from metal. The model is in 25 mm scale and even for that the horse looks very small. The second from the left is a Chevalier Rampant from 1989 (3rd edition). He is similar to a Knight Errant as the Chevaliers Rampants were described in the army list as "young knights". The horse has no barding and is bigger than the later horses with barding. The horse is very wide at the saddle and the knight looks somewhat like he is sitting on a "barrel". The horse model was also used for the Empire and for Chaos Knights. In the middle is a Bretonnian Knight from 1990 (also 3rd edition). It is not specified which kind of knight from the army list he should be so I assume he could be used for any kind. The horse model was also used for other races (High Elves for example). The second from the right is a Knight Errant Champion from 1996 (5th edition) and should be well known. This is the last model that was made from metal (the horse is made from plastic of course). This is the first time that Bretonnians had their own horse models. The knight on the right is a Knight Errant Champion from 2004 (6th edition). He was built from the Bretonnian Knights sprue and is completely made from plastic. The horse is bigger than before and has about the same size like the unbarded horse on the left.   The following picture is a comparison between Knights of the Realm and their former equivalents. On the left is a Feudal Knight from 1987 (2nd edition) from the "F7 Feudal Cavalry" series. The whole model including the horse is made from metal. The model is in 25 mm scale and even for that the horse looks very small. The second from the left is a Knight from the King's Retinue Box from 1989 (3rd edition). The horse has no barding and is bigger than the later horses with barding. The horse is very wide at the saddle and the knight looks somewhat like he is sitting on a "barrel". The horse model was also used for the Empire and for Chaos Knights. In the middle is a Bretonnian Knight from 1991 (also 3rd edition). It is not specified which kind of knight from the army list he should be so I assume he could be used for any kind. The horse model was also used for other races (High Elves for example). The second from the right is a Knight of the Realm from 1997 (5th edition), a less known metal model. The Knights of the Realm plastic models were more common by far, because they were included in the Warhammer 5th edition boxed set. This is the first time that Bretonnians had their own horse models. The knight on the right is a Knight of the Realm from 2004 (6th edition). He was built from the Bretonnian Knights sprue and is completely made from plastic. The horse is bigger than before and has about the same size like the unbarded horse on the left.     The following picture is a comparison between bowmen/archers. On the left is an archer from the "F4 Feudals" series from 1987 (2nd edition). In the "Red Catalogue" he is listed as a Bretonnian model. He is in 25 mm scale. The second from the left is an archer from 1990 (3rd edition). He is already in 28 mm scale. The third bowman from the left is from 1996 (5th edition) and was included in the Warhammer 5th edition boxed set. It is a question of a very common plastic model. The second bowman from the right is from 1997 (5th edition), a less known metal model. The bowman on the right is from 2004 (6th edition). He was built from the Bowmen sprue and is completely made from plastic.     The following picture is a comparison between halberdiers. On the left is a Brigand from 1990 or 1991 (3rd edition). It's the only 3rd edition model with a halberd. The one in the middle is from 1997 (5th edition) and is made from metal. The model on the right is from 2004 (6th edition). He was built from the Men-At-Arms sprue and is completely made from plastic.     The following picture is a comparison between spearmen. All models are made from metal. On the left is a spearman from the "F4 Feudals" series from 1987 (2nd edition). In the "Red Catalogue" he is listed as a Bretonnian model. He is in 25 mm scale, but doesn't seem to be smaller than the others.  The one in the middle is from 1990 (3rd edition). He is already in 28 mm scale.  The model on the right is from 1997 (5th edition). In 6th edition there were no new spearmen models released, though the option is still in the army book.     The following picture is a comparison between foot knights. The first 4 models are made from metal. On the left is a knight from the "F2 Lords of Battle" series from 1986 (2nd edition). In the "Red Catalogue" he is incomprehensibly listed as an Imperial model, but the helmet crest obviously speaks for itself. He is in 25 mm scale. The second from the left is a knight from the "C26 Feudal Men-At-Arms" series from 1986 (2nd edition). In the "Red Catalogue" he is listed as a Bretonnian model. He is in 25 mm scale. The knight in the middle is from 1990 (3rd edition). He is already in 28 mm scale.  The second knight from the right is from 1998 (5th edition) and was originally released for the board game "Warhammer Quest", but was later also released in a blister for WHFB. The model on the right was built by myself from parts of different 6th edition miniatures. He is made mostly from plastic, but the sword arm and the shield are metal. In 6th edition were no new foot knight models released, but the 5th edition models are still available.

Duke of Gisoreux

Duke of Gisoreux

Miniatures from 3rd Edition (released 1987-1991)

As far as I know no Bretonnian miniatures were released during 4th edition (1992-1996). Many 3rd edition models, but not all, are found in the 1991 Citadel Catalogue (also called Red Catalogue). There are also many 2nd edition models shown in this catalogue so it is intended not to show them together with 3rd edition models here. I found many models that are not shown or named in any publication (catalogue, White Dwarf). So I can't be completely sure if there are more unlisted models. It would be very much appreciated to get information on that. All 3rd edition models were made from metal, but all horses were made from plastic. Miniatures before 1989 were in smaller scale (25 mm). Only the swivel gun and the mantlet are still missing in my collection. I have never seen them so I doubt that they were actually ever released despite they are shown in the Red Catalogue.
Bretonnian King and Bretonnian General (1989)   Bretonnian Knight Heroes (4 different models, 1990 or 1991)   Bretonnian Wizards (1989)
The left one was released as an Imperial Wizard, but was used by GW as a Bretonnian wizard in their studio army.)   Chevalier d'Honneur and Chevalier de Notre Dame de Bataille (1989)   Knight from the King's Retinue and Chevalier Rampant (1989)   Bretonnian Knights with Handweapon (10 different models, 1990)   Bretonnian Knights with Lance (10 different models, 1990)   Bretonnian Foot Knights (21 different models, 1990/91)   Mounted Men-At-Arms (8 different models, probably 1991)   Mounted Men-At-Arms with Bows (3 different models, probably 1991)   Retainers and Men-At-Arms (16 different models, 1990/91)   Archers (10 different models, 1990)   Crossbowmen (3 different models, 1990/91)   Crossbowmen (3 different models, 1990/91 and 1987). The right one was released in the "F4 Men-At-Arms" series in White Dwarf 96 from December 1987. This month there was also the release of the 3rd edition of Warhammer and the model was labeled as Bretonnian later in the "Red Catalogue".   Crossbowmen (6 different models, 1988)   Brigands (10 different models, 1990/91)   Breech Loading Bombard (1990/91)   Mortar (1990/91)   Organ Gun (4-barreled, 1990)   Organ Gun (7-barreled, 1990)   Pot-de-Feu (1990)   Ballista (1990)  

Duke of Gisoreux

Duke of Gisoreux

Miniatures from 5th Edition (released 1996-1999)

King of Bretonnia   The Brigands of Bergerac: Bertrand le Brigand, Hugo le Petit and Gui le Gros   The Fey Enchantress and the Green Knight   Baron Odo d'Outremer and Suliman le Saracen   Jules le Jongleur and Tristan le Troubadour   Repanse de Lyonesse and the limited Bretonnian General (I put him on the same horse as Repanse as I think it suits him better).   Bretonnian Hero on Pegasus   Mounted Knight Heroes: Grail Knight Hero with Great Sword, Questing Knight Hero with Lance and Knights of the Realm Hero with Morning Star.   Foot Knight Heroes: Grail Knight Hero (orginally released as Holy Knight), Questing Knight Hero, Knights of the Realm Hero, another Questing Knight Hero (originally from Warhammer Quest) and the Chevalier Ermite de Malmont (French Games Day miniature 1997).   Sorceresses   Knights Errant   Knights of the Realm   Questing Knights   Grail Knights   Men-At-Arms with Spears   Men-At-Arms with Halberds   Bowmen   Squires with Bows   Mounted Squires    

Duke of Gisoreux

Duke of Gisoreux

Meeting Morgusson, the Ironwarden

I decided to assemble this pack of Ironbreakers as Irondrakes because I loved the idea of having a dwarven gunline belching fire and torpedos at anything that  got dug in against my Liberators for too long. I assembled the Ironwarden model first, and named him Morgusson. I started thinking about his backstory and motivation, and naturally grudges were going to be a big part of it. Reading the Core Book's lore on Sigmar clamping down on infighting in Azyr among the factions made me wonder: how would you handle a grudge against one of his chosen heroes? Stormcast were all mortal once and they had flaws, and they made mistakes. I thought about how a Duardin would have to navigate that tricky situation, in which someone who had been put in his grudge book became one of Sigmar's golden boys. It gave me a hook to see how these characters would work in a game and to create a story about them. For now here's Morgusson, assembled with his Grudgehammer Torpedo. In an upcoming entry I'll bring up the Lord-Celestant himself and some backstory on who he was and who he is now.

Zamik

Zamik

The Freeguild General

This one was bought with the first bunch of minis at the end of february. I started him not much after but at the end it took about one month to finish him. This was the first mini I painted in steps with other stuff in between. In the end I`m happy how he turned out. I think he`s a worthy geneal to make the free guilds to Hold the line!
But i have to admit that the model itself is not the most beautiful for me. There are more human models which will suit better as a general. Here are 2 WIPs which i will use as proxy for the general. One is the Ludwig of Schwarzhelm model which is far more detailed and has more life in it:
And the other one is a Valten on horseback. The base will be too large for matched play. But damn, he just needs these two wolfs Somebody of you folks knows the warscroll of the freeguild general? Do you think it`slegal to have sword, shield and the banner? Or does the banner rule out other weaponry?

Stulle

Stulle

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