Odiamh

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About Odiamh

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  • Birthday 03/13/1986

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  1. We have at last come to the week of Adepticon 2017. This will be the first major Wargaming event I will be attending and the excitement is incredible. Games Workshop will be out in force this year with event support and hobby seminars galore. It is going to be big and I cannot wait for Thursday to arrive! Over the past few months, you could see a few posts about Adepticon preparation appearing in your social media feeds. As we grew closer more and more appeared as the Hobby Crunch time swung into full effect. I personally experienced this crunch for other hobbies and conventions, but it was very unique this time around and that is due tot he community. My Lists to hand out As my Stormcast army was changed with the release of the new book I kept struggling on what army list I would bring to the Championship (spoiler it will not be Warrior Brotherhood). I had no idea what else I needed to paint, but along the way, I received lots of support from the Twitter Community as well as my close friends. They would constantly tell me "You can do it! We believe in you!" and it is heartwarming to hear those words from the people I call friends. To top it all off every picture I posted via Twitter on hobby progress for Adepticon was met with words of encouragement and a plethora of likes (hearts?). Which Gryph-Hound made it into my list? (Digby or Becky) I found myself searching for those prepping for Adepticon to offer my own words of encouragement and support. It has been great to see how a community can bond and keep pushing itself more and more while keeping the fun. From finishing my army to working out some giveaways to my opponents I have enjoyed every minute, even the stressful ones. We have a very unique and close-knit community and we cannot forget how great a thing that is as we continue to grow in the future as a game and a hobby. Who will prevail? Only the Faithful! I don't believe I will accomplish everything I intended for Adepticon, but I will be ready enough with the few hours remaining to prepare. I look forward seeing some of you at Adepticon and please do come up to say hello and chat for a bit! If you are not able to attend keep an eye on my Twitter as I will post up as many pictures as I can for everyone to see all the fun! Until next week Happy Hobbying! View the full article
  2. There was not at this event.
  3. This past weekend I was able to attend the first event for The Steel City Sigmar Series. The event was hosted at Legions Hobbies and Games. Organized by Bill Souza and acting as T.O, Mike Ryan. I wanted to run down my games and give some of my opinions from the event. I took Stormcast Eternals to this event using the Hammerstrike and Thunderhead formations. I do want to mention that this club is separate from the local scene that I am trying to grow within my immediate area that has been the focus on my "Building a Community" Series. Steel City Sigmar is where I simply show up to play and compete. It is vastly different from the local group I am struggling with currently. The event consisted of three matched play games at 2000pts using the ITC format. Entry was $20.00 with prizes for First, Second, Third, Painting (although painting was not a requirement), and Smoking Boots (i.e. Last place). As I mentioned above Legions Hobbies and Games hosted the event and we had plenty of tables and space to play. All prize money was given in the form of Store Credit and everyone was scoring ITC points for attending as well as our own in-house point system for Steel City Sigmar. I feel the entry fee was a bit high for a local event, but there were thirteen players who show up to play so perhaps it is what the local scene sees as reasonable. After a bit of banter and coffee, the games got under way. Game 1 My First game was against a club mate Roger who brought a Tzeentch army with Archaon at its head. While I have known Roger for a bit, we have never faced off one another across the table so I was very excited. The first Scenario was "Three Places of Power". Roger had more heroes than I did, but my shooting kept all but Archaon cowering in the back for a large portion of the game. I took an aggressive move early to try and rack up the points before Archaon and his magic began to remove my heroes. The game had a lot of back and forth and stayed tight until the initiative roll for turn four. If I would have won, I would have been able to shoot off one of his scoring heroes. We rolled and he came up with the big roll to seal the game. It was a great game and I learned how to handle Archaon on the table as well as the power Tzeentch is bringing. My big mistake in the game was attempting to drop my Prosecutors from the heavens on a 3 up in order to allow my Hammerstrike Force Paladins to attempt to alpha strike his line. They did not arrive until turn five. A harsh lesson learned to start my game with the Prosecutors on the table. Game 2 Game two was Gift from the Heavens down on the bottom tables after my loss. I was paired off against Pat who was new to Age of Sigmar, but a long time Fantasy player. Pat had a good humor about him and seemed excited to be playing. Pat brought an Eight Edition Dispossessed Army with lots of artillery and shooting. Pat did his best with an underpowered army, but I quickly neutered his army by baiting his killing units away from the objectives and shooting off his artillery crew. I did my best to give him a proper game and we made it through four rounds despite the primary being wrapped by me up in the first few turns. Game 3 (My terrain error is easily seen) I was going into my final game as 1-1. I knew I was most likely out of the running, but I was ready strive to place as well as possible. The last Scenario was "Border War", and I was playing Tom and his Stormcast Army. Tom was new to gaming, and despite a few of the bad habits we all had when beginning he was a good opponent. This game I made my biggest mistake. I am sad to say I did not give Tom a proper game. I took myself out of the game after I realized my mistake. That mistake was that after deployment began I realized terrain had been pushed to the edges by the person before packing up their army. I was stuck deploying on objectives with no cover to be seen. I should have been more aware before deployment or called the T.O. over to rectify the situation, but I mentally took myself out of the game. We threw dice, we did have some fun, but by turn three it was all over. I did my best to give my opponent a good game, but I am sure my attitude wasn't as sporting as it could have been for the game. Tom played very tight and clean and I hope to play him again in the future and have a better experience on the table between the two of us. I placed 12th out of 13 at the end of the day and while the gaming experience wasn't all that great I did learn quite a bit about my army. It didn't work well with how I wished to play. I am currently adjusting in preparation for Adepticon and still considering running Warrior Brotherhood, but more and more I feel the Stormcast Eternal Battalions are too much of a point sink and a strong list might not need to include any. I also got to experience a bad day of gaming and reflect on how I can handle it better in the future as well as look inward to improve myself. Overall what I took away from the event was immensely more valuable than a podium. Club Shirt (Front) Taking a step back to view the event separate from my personal experience I would say it was a good first event. It was organized well and we did great as a club to get the word out to ensure a good turnout. However, I feel the $20.00 entry fee was too steep for the drive and the potential to have a lackluster day. My other concern was the lack of soft scores. The ITC is known to be very competitive, but this kills hobby and ultimately can kill the enjoyment of the game. Only three armies, one being my own, were fully painted and based. I didn't get to play against a finished army that day, which added to me wondering if the drive and entry fee were worth it to me. One bright spot of the day was receiving my Club Shirt. While the first event didn't go all that well for me the next one could be much better and I intend to continue supporting and growing with the club. The turnout was great and I hope it grows to improve the wider scene. Hopefully even my own, more local, group. Bill and Mike did a great job and I have expressed my views of the first event to them both prior to this article. Open feedback will help improve the next event and I am always happy to share both the positive and negative. Club Shirt (Back) Until Next week (Adepticon week!) Happy Hobbying! Edited by Grudgegamer View the full article
  4. I was chatting with my friend about our preparation for Adepticon that is rapidly approaching. An interesting topic came up on where we saw ourselves in a level of competitiveness. I thought it could be a good talking point to discuss how someone might see themselves in the various levels of competition. So much to do and so little time... I see myself as a very competitive player. However, Adepticon will most likely change my perspective on the matter. In my local scene, I hang around the top tables with a high level of consistency. I developed my taste for winning during 8th edition Fantasy and found enjoyment in developing new competitive lists and testing them on the table. When I found that list I would play it for months constantly refining it, and committing the play style and stats to memory. It may sound dull, but if you mix in the background and the story it can feed into a competitive style of play, at least for me it has. I can look at my past and feel proud of my accomplishments and awards. Recently, however, I have been challenged and it is very refreshing to get your teeth kicked in once in a while. That may sound odd, but it is the truth. In a few short games in which I lost has given me more info about how to improve then all the wins combined. Always ask why you lost and be honest in self-critiques. My hobby space with my local event trophies sprinkled about to keep me motivated! It is easy to say that your dice went cold or your opponents dice were hot. We all know this is a dice game and there is a level of luck involved, but when you build and play your lists you should be working to minimize how much luck affects the game. There is always something that you could have done better. Maybe you made one wrong move or buffed the wrong unit that swung the game against you. Being able to see your mistake and work to correct it will make you a better general. A good strategy I have used in the past is to play a game with a like-minded individual, but remove as much of the dice as possible. Instead of rolling to hit, wound, or save use the average of what your dice can produce. Same for Battleshock, running, and charging (this one can be difficult). The only dice that I feel needs to stay random is the Turn Order roll. Keeping that random helps you prepare to be double turned while taking advantage of gaining the double turn. This type of practice is not for everyone, but I find it invaluable. Getting out of your comfort zone and playing new people is an exciting a scary idea. I like the group I play with and I do well in the local group. I could leave it at that and be content with my current status, but what is the point. I want to climb the next mountain no matter its height always reaching for the impossible. I am about to go to Adepticon and I have the confidence to show up and do well, but I also know there is a good chance this mountain will kick me off its rocky slopes. Honestly, I am not afraid to fall as I will learn from my failure and when I stop falling I will stand back up, spit the blood from my mouth and start climbing again! Ever forward! It would be amazing to bring home one of these beauties. Dramatism aside, I look forward to Adepticon and I am going in with confidence. If I win every game I will be over the moon, but if I lose every game I will enjoy the process of learning while meeting and playing new people. I am competitive by nature, but I always see more opportunity to learn from my defeats. Look forward to my post-Adepticon article that will most likely be titled “Big Fish, Little Pond”. Until next week Happy Hobbying! Edited by Grudgegamer View the full article
  5. Welcome to Part 3 of my "Building a Community" Series. If you have missed Part 1 and Part 2, please check them out in the links below. Today I want to talk about my local club’s tables, terrain, etc... I need to be honest with myself. Building and painting terrain can be a chore for the common hobbyist, with the exception of a few notable exceptions. When I go home to hobby I would rather build lists, paint, or convert models while catching up on Warhammer TV streams. I could go on and on about the parts of the hobby that I love, but it would take some time until I mentioned building and painting terrain. I am falling short in raising the bar in that regard for my local scene. When I took over the leadership position of my local club, I inherited a ramshackle assortment of terrain and gaming mats that the club has collected over the past decade. Most of which has been donated from less hobby enthused patrons, to say the least. It is the same terrain in service today. While it is great to have anything to put on the table when you are just starting out, our club has been around for a number of years. Despite my motivation to take the club beyond where it currently stands, I have not managed to rectify this situation. A classic piece of terrain, but it has seen better days... When we show up for Club Meets, we begin by setting up uneven tables in the basement of our local library. Old felt mats, not even cut to the proper size, are then laid out. Terrain, that has seen better days, is then spread out among these felt mats. It is time to correct the situation. My goal has always been to motivate others to play and enjoy Age of Sigmar, and that must include playing on quality tables. Basic field at my local events Many hands make light work, and building and painting does not require a high level of hobby skill, but it does require a time commitment and perhaps even a few dollars. Hopefully, I can get the club on board with taking a few of our standard Club Meets throughout the year to spruce up our tables. My goal isn't to have Holy Wars or Realms at War level of tables, but I would like our club to be able to host a small size one-day event without the feeling that the playing area is lessening the experience of the players. While I need help from my club to improve the tables, I realize I will have to take on most of the responsibility myself to make it all happen. I have worked with my FLGS owner to purchase some Games Workshop terrain for use at the club so each table can have a few high-quality pieces. I need to motivate myself to paint these up quickly to inspire everyone else to put in their effort, so we improve our club as a whole. It won't be an overnight change and it might not be very easy, but it needs to be done. A beautiful table by Steve Herner One day I hope to play on it myself! Luckily, I have a few stalwart friends that I know I can count on. Others I may have to drag along in this process, but that is part of being a motivator. My hope is everyone steps up to help, even if it is only in a small way. The fear is that there are a few who feel they are above this endeavor or do not feel like it is a good use of time. No matter who is on board or possibly not on board, I will give it my all to inspire and motivate others within my club to create the best playing experience possible. A lovingly crafted table by Ming Another thing to keep in mind is that our club currently shares terrain between 40k and Age of Sigmar. While this is great for starting out it will have to change so we can theme our tables wholly within The Mortal Realms. While hills can easily pass for both games I doubt a High Elf Dragon Prince would land next to a power generator and a chemical plant any time soon. As a club, we will need to acknowledge and sort our terrain between the two games to prevent unnecessary damage and keep it thematic. I have seen firsthand how players from other systems can be careless and downright abusive to terrain that they know is not theirs. Hopefully separate tubs will be enough. I have fallen short of my goals for this club so far, but I will work to correct it with their help. Currently, I am striving for having 6 tabletop standard tables with 8-10 quality pieces of terrain for each prepared by the end of this summer. I would like to invite anyone who has advice on the matter or from anybody who has been in a similar situation. I will continue to keep everyone posted on my progress on this topic. Until next week, Happy (Terrain) Hobbying! Building a Community Links: Part 1 Part 2 Edited by @Grudgegamer View the full article
  6. Hello everyone! This week I wanted to give you a short update on my Adepticon 2017 Preperation. Adepticon 2017 is now less than one month away and I am feeling the hobby crunch in full force. This is not a new feeling, as I have experienced it before, although it feels just as stressful and fun as it always has in the past. Perfecting my models, my list, and stashing aside those few extra hobby bucks for an impulse buy constantly occupies my mind. As you may have seen in my previous posts, I plan on taking a Stormcast Eternals force. You will be happy to know that I finished painting the last of my Warrior Brotherhood last Friday night, just in time to see my original plan change the next day when I picked up my copy of the new Stormcast Eternals Battletome. I am in no way upset that Warrior Brotherhood has been altered and that some warscrolls have been changed. I believe it was a necessity for the health of the competitive gaming scene. There appears to be quite a bit of potential in the new Battletome as well. Diving into a new book is always an exciting time, especially “educating” your unfamiliar gaming buddies by catching them off guard. However, I have chosen to stick with my initial plan of taking the Warrior Brotherhood. I may splash into something new from the new Battletome, but I see no reason to alter my plan. I believe the Warrior Brotherhood can still work and I intend to give it a go at Adepticon. I am excited as a Stormcast player, but I feel that I may be running out of time to have an army that I am comfortable with playing. I typically play test a list for a few months before I am familiar with it. It is when I am comfortable playing the army that I can simply enjoy a fun competitive game with some new opponents. I do not want to find myself second guessing my lists and abilities. I feel keeping the bulk of my list as the Warrior Brotherhood will keep me in my comfort zone that I have developed, while at the same time bringing in something fresh. I have a chance to field some new models and units in a competitive environment with a book that is a bit of an unknown. I feel that including some of the newer units could prove to give me a slight advantage over players who are unfamiliar with the change, given that new mechanics and new list compositions can mix things up. I just have to get my head wrapped around the new book and how I can supplement the list I wish to bring. I may feel terribly behind on what I want to have completed for Adepticon, but I am staying motivated. I keep the thought of meeting some of the people I know from Twitter and enjoying time celebrating this hobby. I hope everyone is feeling more confident in their preparation than I am, but if not just stay positive and keep toward your goal as I am doing. If you see me at Adepticon please come say hi! Until Next week Happy Hobbying! Also, I want to apologize again for the delay of last week's blog "Building a Community : Part 2" Feel free to check it out on the link in case you missed it! Edited by @Grudgegamer View the full article
  7. Article edited by @Grudgegamer
  8. Welcome to Part 2 of my Building a Community Series. If you missed Part 1 please check it out here. I apologize for the delay in getting this article posted. In this installment, I want to talk about poisonous players and the current challenges with this type of player that I am currently facing. I will not be calling out anyone by name, as that is not the direction I want to take this article. My wish is to show you my personal dilemma that I have encountered while trying to grow my local scene. Hopefully, my experiences can help others to better prepare for these obstacles. So first let me set the scene. When the 8th Ed. Warhammer Fantasy scene died, I decided to take the reins and lead the Age of Sigmar division of our gaming club, Ligonier Legions. Our club has three main game systems that we run, Flames of War, 40k, and Age of Sigmar. We typically meet twice a month, and Flames of War. Flames of War is the most popular of the games and was guaranteed a date each month. This left 40k and AoS competing for the other date. During this time, I was only in charge of running the Age of Sigmar events. I did not have any authority on picking the dates for which games would be played. This worked for about a year, until recently. The senior member who handled all the higher level duties, as well as running the other game systems, burned out trying to manage it all. He tried listening to everyone in how to run things and gave in to every request. By trying to make everyone happy, this quickly made everyone unhappy. Instead of playing the three main games we were supposed to be dedicated to, we were playing older editions, board games, open games days, build leagues, paint leagues, etc. This led to bitter people blaming everyone else and generally beginning to create a poisonous atmosphere. This should bring everyone up to speed. At the end of 2016, I arrived at a combined 40k/AoS event. The senior member who had been running things up to this point told me that he was done and needed a break from all the aggravation. I was thrust into the position of club leader and running the 40k events as well. I now organize all the events; however, I did have to put someone in charge of running Flames of War, as I am unfamiliar with that system. I had seen this coming, so I had a bit of mental preparation to take over long before it actually happened. The thing I wasn't prepared for though was the complaining that followed, and the poisonous players trying to assert their views. I never realized how a few people could bring a group down and inhibit its growth so easily. Over the past year of running AoS, I have learned to run events and gaming groups with the view that "if I was a player, how would I like this to be run". My first order of business was to adjust how we shared time. I wanted more focus on 40k and Age of Sigmar. These two game systems have a bit of player cross over, as well as a stable core. We now have a solid rotation of 40k and Age of Sigmar, and are able to keep Flames of War consistent each month. Unless the group wants to run an open games day, in which case Flames of War has to volunteer to give up their day. It did not take long after this adjustment for those poisonous players to assert their opinions and make demands that had pulled down the previous leadership. It has been challenging, to say the least. These players have refused to accept that Games Workshop has changed for the better and cling to older editions with zeal. They have had no love for 40k as it stands now for the past year, arranging for previous edition play outs that have had a reduced turnout month after month. When I put the word out that we will rotate 40k and Age of Sigmar they suddenly began defending the game of 40k as if nothing was all that wrong with it anymore. They debated my change because I was taking time away from their failing games for Age of Sigmar. I have explained myself, but they didn't grasp my long view. I understand they want their old editions to become the “new” way to play in the area, but I know we can grow all of our game systems to be equally supported by the player base. They talk about wanting to run older editions of Fantasy and 40K even though in the past these events have failed to draw players. I decided to not simply say no, as I feel that isn’t the right path. I told them that it could be a fun idea and they should organize it on one of our open days. I put the ball in their hands and said go for it. So far they are unwilling to step up and organize it but continue to nag and make comments to other players. You must be cautious if you have players who may be poisonous to your larger group because they could easily get the ears of the newer players with negative remarks or even outright complaints. When my new players show up, I just want them to have fun playing some games, and not have people who take a negative view on the game drag them down. When this happens in my group, I combat the problem in two ways. I counter with my excitement for the game. If this fails, I have no problem pulling the person aside and asking them to set a better example for the younger players. I have seen this succeed in the short term, but old habits tend to die hard so you need to keep aware of the poor attitude returning. The long and short of all this is there will be some people that may be poisonous to your local group for one reason or another. My advice is to set your course and see it to the end. Some people may drop off, but others will join you and those are the players you will want to focus on. It is important to adjust your course from time to time but always head towards your goal of growing your scene. Don't let anyone drag the whole group down, keep motivated, keep active, and keep it fun along the way. All the negative talk will not be able to stand up to the real examples of fun and excitement you will bring to the community. You will fall occasionally, but focus on the good and don't let it drag you down. Until Next Time, Happy Hobbying! View the full article
  9. Keep Trying. AoS is getting so much support that I am sure they have noticed and if you continue to try and show them your enthusiasm they will eventually give it a chance. We lost players to other games as well as people just hanging up the hobby entirely. Some have returned and others have not, but being consistently persistent is the key. The group will ebb and flow, but make sure the core group is making anyone interested welcome in joining in. Maybe ask everyone what kind of AoS they might like to try (narrative, competitive, Triumph & Treachery, etc...). Emphasize that the game is very quick to pick up, but if they want a challenge they can really dive into the warscrolls to find more depth. Have them bring a few of their old models and show them how to download the app for their rules, build a list that's comparable to the points they have and do a demo. Try to do as much as you can for them so they only need to show up with models and dice and have some fun (it can be thankless, but it could work). Work with your FLGS to set up a family game day and give Demos. Maybe there is a group of younger players that are intimidated to come ask to be taught, but an open stress-free event might get them in the store. Just keep trying!
  10. Hey Everyone, I decided to add some bits to one of my Gryph-Hounds recently and it seemed people on Twitter really enjoyed it so I wanted to share it here as well as see if anyone else has done anything similar. I went back and added a bit of flair to my previously painted Gryph-Hound as well. Let's see what our community has done with these little guys. #PimpYourGryph
  11. I indeed have! It was incredibly well laid out and perhaps it could be broken up and redone in your new AoS Daily format (which is part of my daily commute). A lot of the principles and challenges of setting up and growing your local scene crosses the ocean, but I am curious to see how things change as you look at larger and larger scopes.
  12. Thanks! That is an excellent goal and I would be curious to see your progress so keep us updated! I have been looking at getting the US scene moving in a (bit more) unified direction and the more people we have growing the scene the better. I know @Ben has mentioned this before, but I would love to see an App that allows Wargamers to have a small profile, post what armies you play and maybe what list you are currently running to allow more people to connect. It could encompass what style you prefer (narrative, casual, competitive, etc..) and allow messaging within the app to set up games and have push notifications for events within your preferred travel distance. Sadly this is beyond my skill, but I hope someone can take this idea and run with it! I would be happy to help as I could lol.
  13. Hello everyone! I wanted to start a sub-series focused on building a community around Miniature War Gaming (particularly Age of Sigmar) by sharing my experiences. My hope is to speak with other community members during this series, and share ideas to use with local gaming groups. Part one of this series will focus on developing your local scene. I will explore connecting a personal gaming group to a larger scene in future articles. Before I dive in I want to preface the article a bit. I had written an article about building the community, but after some friendly and honest critique, I saw how generic and boring the article was to read. Instead, I am bringing you a fresher and much more personal experience, my experience to be exact, of the challenges in developing a local scene. Please enjoy. At the end of Warhammer Fantasy 8th edition, my local scene was falling apart. My friend that was leading it all at the time was out of steam. The dropping of Age of Sigmar took what little wind he had in his sails away. I can't blame him either, as he had been playing for over 20 years in the Old World. Within a few years, the scene went from tournaments of 24 attendants and up to just him and myself showing up. Thankfully he has returned to the scene and is playing games somewhat more regularly, but he is no longer leading the group. I decided to take up the reins and try to regrow the scene shortly after. I debated with myself “why I had chosen to lead the local scene?” I found my answer after a bit of thinking. I truly love this hobby and this game, and I didn't want to see it die in my local area. So I began taking steps to rebuild. I began showing up to play and teach Age of Sigmar to anyone who would try, but it was weeks until I managed to get anyone to throw dice with me in a game of Age of Sigmar. I won't lie in the fact that it was very rough and heartbreaking at times. My best advice is to never give up and keep showing up to play. You may not get a game in every night, but eventually, you will be playing consistently with a small group. Over time I had a few small groups of people playing regular games and it felt rewarding, but I faced a new challenge. These small groups played only 15 minutes apart from one another, but no matter what I did they simply would not communicate and to this day they still are separate entities with the only connecting being myself as the consistent Age of Sigmar player who leads the scenes. This has been immensely frustrating, to be honest. I have tried to set one-day tournaments with prize support, narrative events, and even simple open games days to get everyone together. Nothing so far has worked, but I have not given up on it happening yet. I hope to ultimately bring these groups together and get them playing with my consistent group (a scene I happily play with but have no part in leading) of game buddies that are a bit farther away. I do not know if this will ever happen, but I continue trying. There have been very exciting times within the groups that made then take leaps and bounds in a positive direction. The first was the release of the Generals Handbook. Many players who were on the fence were finally convinced, as they now had an easier way to set up a game with other players. Those players who held off for so long found themselves with points and small local groups within reach to begin playing with and we welcomed them with open arms. Shortly afterward, we had The Season of War, which we all had something to play for in capturing our perspective cities in order to change the future of the narrative. It was a fun and exciting time. As scenes grow, more and more types of players will join in. Occasionally, however, you will attract people who can be harmful to a local scene. This is a topic I am going to save that for the next installment of my "Building a Community" series. I hope my honesty won't keep anyone from stepping up to lead their local scene. It is a very tough and can be thankless work, but if you are doing it for the right reasons (love of the game and hobby), then the happiness you will experience as positive growth happens will outweigh any of the drawbacks. Feel free to follow me on Twitter and until Next Time Happy Hobbying! Edited by @Grudgegamer on Twitter View the full article
  14. Last week was the anniversary of my blogging career, and I wanted to take a moment to look back on this previous year. On January 23rd, 2016 I released my first blog post. I loved the idea of running my own blog to share my thoughts and ideas with the community in a format beyond Twitter. Truthfully I felt a little intimidated at first. I believe I spent a week or two designing the blog layout and reading articles with titles such as "How to write your First Blog Post". Soon I realized that I just needed to jump in with both feet and enjoy the plunge. Humble Beginnings... I did my best to consistently put out one post each month. I was successful in posting once or twice a month. I, however, did miss a post in the month of August. The topics I discussed were varied and typically what was on my mind at the time. I was able to follow and respond to the trending topics of the Age of Sigmar community at large. It is very likely that you will continue to see the same general composition of topics in the coming year, but I hope to add new topics of my own as well. I believe responding to current events in the community and introducing topics of my own will create a continuing narrative between you, the readers, and myself. This year I decided to make a few changes to my blog. The biggest was switching to a weekly release format. I am still adjusting to the new level of output, but I am very happy with the change. One of my goals is to ensure I post entries on the same day every week within the next few months. The other big change was the addition of my friend Tom as my editor. If you have read my blog before, it isn't a secret that I am not the best with grammar or sentence structure, but I am striving to improve on this. Tom has stepped up to edit my posts in order give you an improved professional product. I have had a lot of support throughout this past year. I want to end by offering my thanks to everyone who joined me on this journey. First, let me thank those in the Twitter community who have retweeted my blog posts, encouraged me along the way, and read my blog. Second, I want to thank Tom who is now editing my blog. He is volunteering his time to help me produce a better product. He also has been my longest wargaming buddy. He has taught me a lot about the way of gaming and tactics throughout the years. Next, I want to thank my closest friends who are always there encouraging me. They are not all wargamers, but they can see my love for this game, and buy me brushes, paints, models, and put up with my questioning of "What color scheme should this army be?" or "How does this look?". When they visit my home, I am always humbled by the amount of time they spend looking at my latest work. It truly fills me with joy having friends like this in my life. Last I want to thank my wife for many of the same reason as my friends, but also because she allows me to put the time into my hobby as well display my armies throughout our home. And of course, I cannot forget to thank you, my readers. I am always pleased to see when my reader numbers increase every month. Without you, this blog would not be worth it. I hope you have enjoyed my first year and are looking forward to the coming year of posts. The best thing I can hope for is that every one of you will share my blog with you gaming friends and clubs. I also encourage you all to reach out to me about any topics you might be interested in seeing in the coming year. Until next week, Happy Hobbying! Edited by @Grudgegamer on Twitter View the full article
  15. That is fantastic! I hope it translates as well over on the east coast. It is up to all of us to grow our hobby beyond where it has ever been before.